Dallas County Reports 789 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

The City of Duncanville is within Dallas County and Dallas County Health and Human Services is the lead agency in charge of gathering and reporting this information.

This post also includes July 28, 2020 Dallas County Health and Human Services 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Summary. This summary provides additional data related to the pandemic.


As of 11:00 am July 28, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 789 additional confirmed cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total confirmed case count in Dallas County to 48,028, including 622 confirmed deaths.

The additional 15 deaths being reported today include:

  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He was found deceased at home and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Grand Prairie. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Lancaster. He had been critically ill in an area hospital.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Irving. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Irving. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Mesquite. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was an inmate of a correctional facility in the City of Seagoville. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 80’s who was a resident of the City of Irving. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of the City of Richardson. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 90’s who was a resident of the City of Grand Prairie. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 90’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of DeSoto. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 90’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. She expired in the facility and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 90’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. She expired in the facility and had underlying high-risk health conditions.

Over 1,800 children under 18 years of age have been diagnosed with confirmed COVID‐19 since July 1st, including 38 children who have been hospitalized for COVID‐19 and 4 admitted to intensive care units. Of all confirmed cases requiring hospitalization to date, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 remains high, with 22% of symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals testing positive in week 29. Of cases requiring hospitalization who reported employment, over 80% have been critical infrastructure workers, with a broad range of affected occupational sectors, including healthcare, transportation, food and agriculture, public works, finance, communications, clergy, first responders, and other essential functions.

Of the 622 confirmed deaths reported to date, about a third have been associated with long-term care facilities. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. We continue to see high numbers of COVID-19 patients in Dallas County with 697 people in acute care for the period ending Monday, July 27. Additionally, the number of emergency room visits for COVID-19 like symptoms in Dallas County was 425 in the 24 hour period ending Monday, July 27, which represents around 22 percent of all emergency department visits in the county according to information reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council. These numbers are still very elevated but not increasing.

“Today’s numbers, while higher than yesterday, continue the trend of being lower than we saw two weeks ago. In looking at the numbers, it’s important to focus not on the daily numbers but on the seven day and fourteen day rolling averages. If you continue to wear your mask around people outside your household, maintain six foot distancing from people outside your household, limit trips to necessities only and use good hygiene, we will see the numbers go down. I know it’s hot and the mask can be uncomfortable at times, but it’s a small price to pay to keep us safe, strengthen our economy and get our kids back to school. The decisions each of us make have a big impact on the numbers and all of us have an important role to play in controlling the spread of COVID-19. For detailed information about what activities doctors recommend you avoid and what activities you can participate in and how best to do it, go to www.DallasCountyCOVID.org,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.


All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 426 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

The City of Duncanville is within Dallas County and Dallas County Health and Human Services is the lead agency in charge of gathering and reporting this information.


As of 11:00 am July 27, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 426 additional confirmed cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total confirmed case count in Dallas County to 47,239, including 607 confirmed deaths.

The additional 2 deaths being reported today include:

  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Balch Springs. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have any underlying high-risk health conditions.

Over 1,450 children under 18 years of age have been diagnosed with confirmed COVID-19 during the first three weeks of July. During this timeframe, 29 children have been hospitalized for COVID-19, including 4 admitted to intensive care units. Of all confirmed cases requiring hospitalization to date, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 remains high, with 22% of symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals testing positive in week 29. Of cases requiring hospitalization who reported employment, over 80% have been critical infrastructure workers, with a broad range of affected occupational sectors, including healthcare, transportation, food and agriculture, public works, finance, communications, clergy, first responders, and other essential functions.

Of the 607 confirmed deaths reported to date, about a third have been associated with long-term care facilities. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays.

Due to reporting changes implemented by Health and Human Services and the Texas Department of State Health Services, we’ve been advised that detailed bed census information reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council will be unavailable for the next few days.

“Today’s numbers are lower than they have been since June 25. Although there is some concern that some of the testing may not be getting through on the reports due to a potential glitch in the state’s electronic laboratory reporting system, I’m increasingly optimistic that your use of masks and sacrificial delay of unnecessary trips outside the home for things other than necessities are having an impact on flattening the recent explosion in cases since the Governor’s Open Texas plan was implemented. Please keep wearing your mask and don’t let up on making smart decisions. Public health and our economy can’t afford it.

For detailed advice from doctors on which activities to participate in and how to participate in those activities, please go to www.DallasCountyCOVID.org, and when you leave your home, even if you’re walking the dog and think you won’t see other people, take a mask with you because you could run into people. If you’re walking on a trail, and people are walking the opposite direction, you’ll be within six feet of one another so please wear your face covering, and although not mandated by the Governor’s or Dallas County’s order, the CDC strongly encourages children over age two to wear a face covering. As I’ve said before, please avoid any business where a face mask cannot be worn one hundred percent of the time,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.


All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 800 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

The City of Duncanville is within Dallas County and Dallas County Health and Human Services is the lead agency in charge of gathering and reporting this information.


As of 11:00 am July 26, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 800 additional confirmed cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total confirmed case count in Dallas County to 46,813, including 605 confirmed deaths. The additional death being reported today is a man in his 40’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.

Over 1,450 children under 18 years of age have been diagnosed with confirmed COVID-19 during the first three weeks of July.  During this timeframe, 29 children have been hospitalized for COVID-19, including 4 admitted to intensive care units. Of all confirmed cases requiring hospitalization to date, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 remains high, with 22% of symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals testing positive in week 29. Of cases requiring hospitalization who reported employment, over 80% have been critical infrastructure workers, with a broad range of affected occupational sectors, including healthcare, transportation, food and agriculture, public works, finance, communications, clergy, first responders, and other essential functions.

Of the 605 confirmed deaths reported to date, about a third have been associated with long-term care facilities. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays.


All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 1,267 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

The City of Duncanville is within Dallas County and Dallas County Health and Human Services is the lead agency in charge of gathering and reporting this information.


As of 11:00 am July 25, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 1,267 additional confirmed cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total confirmed case count in Dallas County to 46,013, including 604 confirmed deaths.

The additional deaths being reported today include:

  • A man in his 30’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 40’s who was a resident of the City of Duncanville. He had been critically ill in an area hospital.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Grand Prairie. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. He expired in the facility and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Lancaster. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of DeSoto. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Cedar Hill. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. He expired in the facility and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of DeSoto. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. She expired in the facility and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Mesquite. He had been hospitalized and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of DeSoto. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 90’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. She expired in the facility and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.

There have been over 98 confirmed COVID-19 cases in children and staff reported from 65 separate daycares in Dallas County since June 1st, including 3 staff members requiring hospitalization. Of the cases requiring hospitalization to date, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 remains high, with 22% of symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals testing positive in week 29. Of cases requiring hospitalization who reported employment, over 80% have been critical infrastructure workers, with a broad range of affected occupational sectors, including: healthcare, transportation, food and agriculture, public works, finance, communications, clergy, first responders and other essential functions.

Of the 604 confirmed deaths reported to date, about a third have been associated with long-term care facilities. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays.

Due to reporting changes implemented by Health and Human Services and the Texas Department of State Health Services, we’ve been advised that detailed bed census information reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council will be unavailable for the next few days.

“Today is our highest day for reported new cases. Additionally, the 18 deaths reported today make this the deadliest week thus far in the outbreak. We will see improvements if we continue to wear our masks whenever outside our home and if we avoid unnecessary trips and any establishment where a mask cannot be worn one hundred percent of the time. This includes in-restaurant dining; however, our restaurants are at a critical point. With PPP having run out and most people following the health advice and not eating in dining rooms, restaurant revenues are dropping off. If you’re able, please order take-out and delivery from our restaurants to support them and the people that they employ.

I know today’s numbers are disappointing but if we continue to do what science tells us is necessary to keep ourselves safe, we’ll see benefits. I again call on Governor Abbott to listen to the advice that doctors have given for the last month to close all businesses where masks cannot be worn one hundred percent of the time, including in-restaurant dining, youth sports, community pools, high-intensity workout classes, gyms, cigar bars, day camps, arcades, movie theaters, bowling alleys, amusement parks, concert venues, sporting arenas, group weddings or other large events or any other venue where there are high-touch surfaces and masks cannot be worn at all times,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.


All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 659 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

The City of Duncanville is within Dallas County and Dallas County Health and Human Services is the lead agency in charge of gathering and reporting this information.


DALLAS — As of 11:00 am July 24, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 659 additional confirmed cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total confirmed case count in Dallas County to 44,746, including 586 confirmed deaths.

The 9 additional deaths being reported today include:

  • A 5-year-old boy who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 40’s who was a resident of the City of Grand Prairie. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Irving. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He was found deceased at home and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been hospitalized and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 80’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. She expired in the facility and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.

Over 1,450 children under 18 years of age have been diagnosed with confirmed COVID-19 during the first three weeks of July, including 29 children who have been hospitalized for COVID-19 during that timeframe. There have been over 98 confirmed COVID-19 cases in children and staff reported from 65 separate daycares in Dallas County since June 1st, including 3 staff members requiring hospitalization. Of the cases requiring hospitalization to date, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 remains high, with 22% of symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals testing positive in week 29. Of cases requiring hospitalization who reported employment, over 80% have been critical infrastructure workers, with a broad range of affected occupational sectors, including: healthcare, transportation, food and agriculture, public works, finance, communications, clergy, first responders and other essential functions.

Of the 586 confirmed deaths reported to date, about a third have been associated with long-term care facilities. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays.

Due to reporting changes implemented by Health and Human Services and the Texas Department of State Health Services, we’ve been advised that detailed bed census information reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council will be unavailable for the next few days.

“I believe we are beginning to see a positive trend due to the masking order that Dallas County implemented a month ago that was later followed by Governor Abbott and made statewide. The fact that our numbers are down though does not mean that we can afford to relax what we’ve been doing. One hundred percent mask wearing around other people outside your home is critical to our success going forward.

Sadly today we announced the death of a five year old child from COVID-19. This is our first pre-teen death here in Dallas County. I want to point out to the public that we have seen a sharp uptick in children getting COVID. We currently have over 1,450 children under age 18 who’ve tested positive since July 1. Parents, it’s imperative that children, like everyone else, follow the guidelines to stay safe. Wear a mask whenever possible, avoid contact outside the home and unnecessary trips, and everyone please download the colorcoded chart for what is safe for your families at www.DallasCountyCOVID.org. By working together we can keep our community safe and get our economy moving stronger,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.


Dallas County Health and Human Services 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID‐19) Summary

July 21, 2020

Click images to enlarge.

All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

DCHHS announces re-opening of Emergency Housing Assistance Program for Dallas County Residents

DALLAS (July 24, 2020) – Dallas County Health and Human Services (DCHHS) announces the re-opening of the Emergency Housing Assistance Program (EHAP) for residents of Dallas County. This program provides short-term, rental, mortgage, and utility assistance to Dallas County residents living outside the City of Dallas facing economic hardship in the wake of COVID-19. Assistance for EHAP is eligibility based and will be processed through a lottery system.

DCHHS will begin accepting pre-screening applications online at https://www.dallascounty.org/ehap starting Friday, July 24, 2020, at 10:00 a.m. (CT) and close the pre-screening application process on Thursday, August 20, 2020, at 4:00 p.m. (CT). The pre-screening application form is available both, in English and Spanish. If you are an individual who does not have access to the internet or is unable to access the pre-screening application online, please call 214-819-1968. Pre-screening applications accepted by phone will be conducted Monday – Thursday from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. (CT). Please note that the submission of a pre-screening application does not guarantee eligibility or an offer of assistance. Only completed applications meeting eligibility requirements, and supported by required documentation, will be considered for assistance based on the availability of funds. Applicants must be 18 years of age or older to apply.

“Given that we are encouraging families to stay home as much as possible right now, keeping people in their homes is especially critical,” said DCHHS Director, Dr. Philip Huang. “As we continue to fight this virus, EHAP will help thousands of Dallas County families in need.”

For more information, please visit:

https://www.dallascounty.org/departments/dchhs/ehap-cares.php or https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/emergency-assistance.php


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 648 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

The City of Duncanville is within Dallas County and Dallas County Health and Human Services is the lead agency in charge of gathering and reporting this information.


DALLAS — As of 11:00 am July 23, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 648 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total case count in Dallas County to 44,087, including 579 deaths.

The additional 12 deaths being reported today include:

  • A man in his 30’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He expired in an area hospital ED and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He was found deceased at home and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. He expired in the facility and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 80’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of the City of Rowlett. He had been hospitalized.
  • A woman in her 90’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 90’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Richardson. He expired in the facility and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 90’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.

Over 1,200 children under 18 years of age have been diagnosed with confirmed COVID-19 during the first three weeks of July, including 29 children who have been hospitalized for COVID-19 during that timeframe.
There have been 98 confirmed COVID-19 cases in children and staff reported from 65 separate daycares in Dallas County since June 1st, including 3 staff members requiring hospitalization.

Of the cases requiring hospitalization to date, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19. The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 remains high, with 26.8% of symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals testing positive in week 28.Of cases requiring hospitalization who reported employment, over 80% have been critical infrastructure workers, with a broad range of affected occupational sectors, including healthcare, transportation, food, and agriculture, public works, finance, communications, clergy, first responders and other essential functions.

Of the 579 total deaths reported to date, about a third have been associated with long-term care facilities. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays.

Due to reporting changes implemented by Health and Human Services and the Texas Department of State Health Services, we’ve been advised that detailed bed census information reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council will be unavailable for the next few days.

“Today is our third day below 1,000 cases. It’s still a little too early to call this a trend but I’m encouraged by the lowering of the number of new cases. We announced the deaths of 12 more residents today including a man in his 30s and several people in their 60’s, some of whom did not have underlying health conditions.

We continue to see businesses operate where masks are not possible 100 percent of the time and, pursuant to the recommendations of our public health experts, ask the Governor to close these businesses. In the time of COVID-19, there is no reason for traditional bars to be closed but topless bars and cigar bars to remain open. The doctors and I strongly recommend that you avoid participating in activities where masks cannot be worn 100 percent of the time by everyone there, such as in-restaurant dining, youth sports, community pools, highintensity workout classes, gyms, cigar bars, day camps, arcades, movie theaters, bowling alleys, amusement parks, concert venues, sporting arenas, group weddings or other large events or any other venue where there are high-touch surfaces and masks cannot be worn at all times.

It’s imperative that we all wear our mask when we’re outside the home and around other people and that we avoid unnecessary trips. Make shopping lists so that you only go shopping one time and delay shopping and other trips that can be done after the case numbers are lower. We can get through this North Texas if we all make good choices. Download the doctors’ color-coded cheat sheet at www.DallasCountyCOVID.org for specific information about activities and always take your mask when leaving your home,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.


Dallas County Health and Human Services 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID‐19) Summary

July 21, 2020

Click images to enlarge.

All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Mosquito Spraying Scheduled For July 23 and 24

The City of Duncanville, at the recommendation and in cooperation with the Dallas County Health and Human Services (DCHHS), will be conducting ground spraying in response to a positive West Nile Virus sample found in the area. Spraying against mosquitos will happen on Thursday, July 23, and Friday, July 24, between the hours of 9:00 PM and 5:00 AM, weather permitting. If the weather prohibits spraying on Thursday night, spraying will be done on Friday and Saturday nights. Spraying will be performed in the area that is south of Camp Wisdom, north of Wheatland, west of Main Street and east of Clark Road.

Residents living near this area are encouraged to remain indoors and bring their pets inside during spraying.

City Staff will continue to monitor areas where mosquito breeding is most likely to occur. To prevent the spread of mosquitoes, residents should remove all areas of standing water report all pools that are not well maintained and abandoned homes where mosquitoes are likely to breed to the Health and Code Enforcement Department. Everyone should continue to protect themselves against the West Nile Virus by using insect repellent containing DEET. Citizens are also encouraged to remain indoors during dawn and dusk when mosquitoes are most active.

For more information on the scheduled ground mosquito spraying in Duncanville, contact Angelica Garcia at 972-707-3880.


The City of Duncanville has a limited supply of Summit MosquitoDunks available on the West Side of City Hall, Building Inspections desk. Drop by today and pick up a MosquitoDunk for yourself today. Limit one package per household.

Dallas County Reports 413 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

This post includes the July 22, 2020 press release from Dallas County with new positive case reporting as well as the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Summary for July 21, 2020. The summary provides more detailed information on testing, positivity rates, hospitalizations as well as positive cases for Duncanville, Texas.

The City of Duncanville is within Dallas County and Dallas County Health and Human Services is the lead agency in charge of gathering and reporting this information.

Updated 07-23-2020 with the July 21, 2020 Summary.

DALLAS — As of 11:00 am July 22, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 413 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total case count in Dallas County to 43,439, including 567 deaths.

The additional 30 deaths being reported today include:

  • A woman in her 40’s who was a resident of the City of Irving. She expired in an area hospital ED and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He was found deceased at home and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He was found deceased at home and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 50’s who was a resident of the City of Richardson. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. He expired in an area hospital ED and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Irving. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. He expired in the facility and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Mesquite. He expired in an area hospital ED and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. He expired in hospice care.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He expired in hospice care and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Grand Prairie. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Mesquite. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Irving. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Mesquite. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 80’s who was a resident of the City of Carrollton. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 90’s who was a resident of the City of Irving. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 90’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 90’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. She expired in the facility.

Over 1,200 children under 18 years of age have been diagnosed with confirmed COVID-19 during the first three weeks of July, including 29 children who have been hospitalized for COVID-19 during that timeframe.
There have been 98 confirmed COVID-19 cases in children and staff reported from 65 separate daycares in Dallas County since June 1st, including 3 staff members requiring hospitalization.

Of the cases requiring hospitalization to date, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19. The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 remains high, with 26.8% of symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals testing positive in week 28. Of cases requiring hospitalization who reported employment, over 80% have been critical infrastructure workers, with a broad range of affected occupational sectors, including healthcare, transportation, food and agriculture, public works, finance, communications, clergy, first responders, and other essential functions.

Of the 567 total deaths reported to date, about a third have been associated with long-term care facilities. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. We continue to see record-high numbers of COVID-19 patients in Dallas County with 831 people in acute care for the period ending Tuesday, July 21. Additionally, the number of emergency room visits for COVID-19 like symptoms in Dallas County was 678 in the 24 hour period ending Tuesday, July 21, which represents around 29 percent of all emergency department visits in the county according to information reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council. These 831 patients match our previous high number of patients in acute care, these sustained high and increasing numbers show the tremendous impact and harm COVID-19 has on our community. You can find additional information on risk-level monitoring data here.

“Today we see a record for deaths reported in one day but also a very good number on the number of positive cases reported. It’s too early to say if this is the beginning of a trend or some anomaly but we were expecting good results from mask compliance after most persons visiting businesses and around others outside their home have been wearing their mask. The wearing of masks is the single most effective tool to prevent the spread of coronavirus when people congregate outside their homes and increase the risk of spread.

You should continue to avoid any business where 100 percent mask-wearing is not enforced or possible such as in-restaurant dining, youth sports, community pools, high-intensity workout classes, gyms, cigar bars, day camps, arcades, movie theaters, bowling alleys, amusement parks, concert venues, sporting arenas, group weddings or other large events or any other venue where there are high-touch surfaces and masks cannot be
worn at all times.

Additionally, daycare should be limited to essential workers only as we are seeing an increase in the spread to young people. We can and will get through this and come out stronger on the other side but it takes all of us making smart personal responsibility choices, wearing a mask outside of our home, and avoiding any unnecessary contact. You should only be going out for necessities and exercise during this time of high spread,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.


Dallas County Health and Human Services
2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID‐19) Summary for July 21, 2020

Click images to enlarge.

All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Getting Lost in Time Travel

Warning: there are a few spoilers. Then again, the spoilers might just entice you enough to crack open these really fun books.

Imagination gone wild

I often imagine after reading such a story how characters from that different era would react to the world today. (Covid-19 pandemic aside.) What would they think about zooming 60 or more miles per hour on a freeway? Getting to a place far away on a map in a short period of time compared to horse travel.  Cooking food in minutes in a microwave. I imagine how they would marvel at how cool a building can be with air conditioning. How immodest or bizarre would we look with our modern clothes? How would synthetic fabrics feel to them? I imagine the looks on their faces walking around in shoes that have comfy memory foam in them. What would they think of watching a movie on a big HD 4k TV, and the ability to stream hundreds of movies with a remote? What would they think about as we talk at a screen at a drive-thru and the result is getting hot food ready to eat? No butchering required! What would a trip to a grocery store feel like to them? So many choices! I like to put a favorite character in my imagination in these scenarios and think out how they would react to our way of life in their way with their personalities.

History made fun

The best stories have rich characters and relationships- not just romantic entanglements, but also rivalries, great friendships, and reading about what drives these characters.

Here come the spoilers

These exact things can be found in the “Outlander” series by Diana Gabaldon. The series revolves around Claire, a WWII nurse who travels back and forth in time. She ends up being married to different men in the different whens, getting pregnant in one time and raising the child in another. She encounters numerous historical figures and has so many amazing adventures, both good and bad.  Her child and grandchildren also have the ability to travel in time. In this particular series, not everyone can time travel.

Staff thoughts

I asked other staff who love these books as much as I do what their favorite books and moments are. Tech Services Librarian, Hannah, said that she couldn’t pick a favorite book.  Community Services Librarian, Stephanie, says the second book (Dragonfly in Amber) was most memorable to her because of how it jumped in time 20 years. “It nearly drove me nuts thinking I had missed a book,” she said.

Hannah most enjoyed reading about the Revolutionary War. “That was the most fun to read for me. And the most memorable part was in ‘The Fiery Cross‘, which begins with an eventful day – which lasts over 100 pages,” she said.

Stephanie also enjoyed the scene where the men go off on a buffalo hunt, but one buffalo gets past them and winds up in the front yard of Claire and Jamie.

The author has crafted so many intriguing stories around the many characters in her books. This is the kind of series where you cheer on your favorite characters and hope bad things-I mean justice- will happen to the unsavory characters.

Bringing Jamie to life

In my imaginings, I bring Jamie, Claire’s second husband, to modern times. I imagine the things he would say, and how he would react to how we live. I imagine calming down the alarm he might feel and showing him the sights, explaining why certain things are done and others must not be done, like engaging in vigilante behavior. I imagine what kind of attention he might draw, especially if he insisted on walking around in a kilt. I also imagine what adventures we might have. Would we spring someone from jail who was unlawfully incarcerated, or rescue someone in peril? Would we hike around North Carolina, and would he hunt down something that would then be cooked on a fire? What could he teach me as we go along hiking? Who would we meet and how would those stories get played out?

Concluding hopes

I look forward to reading about Jaime in his own time in the next book. I hope the people who would do harm to his grandson meet his justice. I wonder if Bree, the daughter, will have another child. Will the Revolutionary War be brought up again in the story? And what graphic medical procedures will Claire be doing in the next book? Claire’s doings in her surgery bring up a mixture of revulsion and fascination in me.

Hannah is hoping for a family reunion and fewer intense situations of peril. Stephanie prefers not to think about it. She hates spoilers.


As always, catch us on social media or comment below. If you have a library question, call 972-780-5052 or email librarians@duncanville.com.