Dallas County Reports 152 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

The City of Duncanville is within Dallas County and Dallas County Health and Human Services is the lead agency in charge of gathering and reporting this information.


As of 3:00 pm September 11, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 259 additional confirmed cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total confirmed case count in Dallas County to 74,887 including 965 confirmed deaths. The total number of probable cases in Dallas County is 3,404, including 10 probable deaths from COVID-19. Of the 259 new cases we are reporting today, 109 came through the Texas Department of State Health Services’ (DSHS) electronic laboratory reporting (ELR) system and 64 were from previous months. Please see a provisional breakdown below of these newly reported cases by date of collection:

Month# of positive patients
July23
August41
September45
Total from previous months109

The additional death being reported today is of a 78-year-old woman who was a resident of the City of Sunnyvale. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.

The provisional 7-day average daily new confirmed and probable cases (by date of test collection) for CDC week 36 was 243, slightly decreased from the previous CDC week 35’s daily average of 295. The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 remains high with 10.8% of symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals testing positive in week 36.

A provisional total of 104 confirmed and probable COVID-19 cases were diagnosed in school-aged children (5 to 17 years) during CDC week 36 (week ending 9/5/2020), a decline from the previous week for this age group. Over the past 2 weeks, 31 cases of COVID-19 have been reported associated with multiple youth hockey teams in the DFW area, including 5 coaches. One 29-year old hockey coach was reported to have had COVID-19 at the time of his death last week in an adjacent county.

Of all confirmed cases requiring hospitalization to date, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19. Of the total confirmed deaths reported to date, about 25% have been associated with long-term care facilities.

New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays. Friday’s report is attached.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. There were 332 COVID-19 patients in acute care in Dallas County for the period ending on Thursday, September 10. The number of emergency room visits for COVID-19 like symptoms in Dallas County was 391 for the 24 hour period ending on Thursday, September 10, which represents around 16 percent of all emergency department visits in the county according to information reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council. While these numbers represent a significant decline from record highs in July, the disruptive impact of COVID-19 on our populations and health care systems remains. You can find additional information on risk-level monitoring data HERE.

Additionally, Figure 1 and Table 11 below are from the September 11, 2020 Dallas County Health and Human Services 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Summary. Figure 1 shows the confirmed COVID-19 positive cases by date of test collection. This chart includes all delayed results that were received by DCHHS as of 8:00pm Thursday. Table 11 is a summary of confirmed and probable cases and deaths over the past five weeks in Dallas County.

“Today we’re reporting another 259 total new cases, 195 of which are from the month of September. We have 64 cases from previous months from the state’s electronic laboratory reporting system. Also today we report an additional death. Our numbers on the charts above show a decline in cases for the week ending September 5th and the percent positivity rate for that week remaining the same. Also the number of students that were positive was down for the week of September 5th . There are concerning numbers in that the R naught has gone up as well as we’ve seen an increase in some other metrics and the Public Health Committee is meeting today to look at these factors and ascertain any root causes and information that may be helpful in controlling the spread.

Today is September 11 th and is a day that reminds us of the great sacrifice of many to protect freedom. If those who have gone before us can do great acts of heroism, we can do simple acts of kindness and consideration to protect our fellow resident from COVID-19 to keep our businesses strong and to get more of our kids back into school sooner. So please wear your mask and maintain six foot distance, wash your hands frequently, avoid unnecessary trips, and stay away from indoor crowds where people are not wearing their mask one hundred percent of the time,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.



All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found HERE and all guidance documents can be found HERE.

UPDATED – Dallas County Health and Human Services Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Summary – September 11, 2020

Specific Guidance for the Public:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Avoid close contact outside your home: Put 6 feet of distance between yourself and people who don’t live in your household.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others and continue to keep about 6 feet between yourself and others. The cloth face cover is not a substitute for social distancing.
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands often and with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-base hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces daily using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash. If you do not have a tissue, use your sleeve, not your hands. Immediately wash your hands.
  • Monitor your health daily. Be alert for symptoms. Take your temperature and follow CDC guidance if symptoms develop.

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 152 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

The City of Duncanville is within Dallas County and Dallas County Health and Human Services is the lead agency in charge of gathering and reporting this information.


As of 12:00 pm September 10, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 152 additional confirmed cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total confirmed case count in Dallas County to 74,628 including 964 confirmed deaths. The total number of probable cases in Dallas County is 3,320, including 10 probable deaths from COVID-19. Of the 152 new cases we are reporting today, 72 came through the Texas Department of State Health Services’ (DSHS) electronic laboratory reporting (ELR) system and are all from collection dates in September. Please see a provisional breakdown below of these newly reported cases by date of collection:

Month# of positive patients
September72

The additional 7 deaths being reported today include the following:

  • A woman in her 40’s who was a resident of the City of DeSoto. She expired in an area hospital ED and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A pregnant woman in her 40’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She expired in an area hospital ED, and did not have other underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Wilmer. He was found deceased at home and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He was found deceased at home and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She was found deceased at home and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. He expired in an area hospital ED and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He was found deceased at home and had underlying high-risk health conditions.

The provisional 7-day average daily new confirmed and probable cases (by date of test collection) for CDC week 35 was 277, slightly increased from the previous CDC week 34’s daily average of 238. The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 remains high with 10.8% of symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals testing positive in week 35.

A provisional total of 156 confirmed and probable COVID-19 cases were diagnosed in school-aged children (5 to 17 years) during CDC week 35 (week ending 8/29/2020), a continued increased trend from the previous two weeks for this age group. Over the past 2 weeks, 31 cases of COVID-19 have been reported associated with multiple youth hockey teams in the DFW area, including 5 coaches. One 29-year old hockey coach was reported to have had COVID-19 at the time of his death last week in an adjacent county.

Of all confirmed cases requiring hospitalization to date, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19. Of the total confirmed deaths reported to date, about 25% have been associated with long-term care facilities. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. There were 354 COVID-19 patients in acute care in Dallas County for the period ending on Wednesday, September 9. The number of emergency room visits for COVID-19 like symptoms in Dallas County was 490 for the 24 hour period ending on Wednesday, September 9, which represents around 21 percent of all emergency department visits in the county according to information reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council. While these numbers represent a significant decline from record highs in July, the disruptive impact of COVID-19 on our populations and health care systems remains. You can find additional information on risk-level monitoring data HERE.

Additionally, included into today’s release is an updated R0 chart from UT Southwestern Medical Center (UTSW). R0, pronounced “R naught,” is a mathematical term that indicates how contagious an infectious disease is. It is also referred to as the reproduction number. R0 tells you the average number of people who will contract a contagious disease from one person with that disease. For example, if a disease has an R0 of 18, a person who has the disease will transmit it to an average of 18 other people. By contrast, If R0 is less than 1, each existing infection causes less than one new infection. In this case, the disease will decline and eventually die out.

“Today I’m sad to report the death of seven more county residents from COVID-19, including a pregnant woman in her 40s without other high risk health conditions. These deaths bring our total of confirmed COVID-19 deaths since March to 964. Today we report an additional 152 cases, all of which we categorize as new cases. All the cases from the state’s electronic laboratory reporting system we received today were tests from September.

Hopefully the number of positive cases today will begin a trend back lower as we’ve seen a rise in the last week of COVID-19 positive cases and the latest R0, pronounced R naught, seen in the UTSW chart show that our R0 may have recently gone above 1, which may lead to outbreaks and an increase in the number of cases in our community. A R0 score above one means there are more people getting sick from COVID-19 than just replacing those who have been sick. We and doctors of course will be watching all of these factors very closely.

Everyone has a role to play and it’s very important that you and everyone you have influence over wear their mask one hundred percent of the time when they’re around others outside the home, maintain six foot distance, wash hands frequently, avoid unnecessary trips, and avoid trips where masks cannot be worn one hundred percent of the time. If we all keep our resolve up, we can lower the infection rate and keep more people from getting sick, more businesses open, and get more kids back into school faster,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.



All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found HERE and all guidance documents can be found HERE.

UPDATED – Dallas County Health and Human Services Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Summary – September 8, 2020

Specific Guidance for the Public:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Avoid close contact outside your home: Put 6 feet of distance between yourself and people who don’t live in your household.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others and continue to keep about 6 feet between yourself and others. The cloth face cover is not a substitute for social distancing.
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands often and with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-base hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces daily using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash. If you do not have a tissue, use your sleeve, not your hands. Immediately wash your hands.
  • Monitor your health daily. Be alert for symptoms. Take your temperature and follow CDC guidance if symptoms develop.

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 266 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

The City of Duncanville is within Dallas County and Dallas County Health and Human Services is the lead agency in charge of gathering and reporting this information.


As of 12:00 pm September 9, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 376 additional confirmed cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total confirmed case count in Dallas County to 74,476 including 957 confirmed deaths. The total number of probable cases in Dallas County is 3,258, including 10 probable deaths from COVID-19. Of the 376 new cases we are reporting today, 168 came through the Texas Department of State Health Services’ (DSHS) electronic laboratory reporting (ELR) system with 110 from older months. Please see a provisional breakdown below of these newly reported cases by date of collection:

Month# of positive patients
July19
August91
September58

The additional 9 deaths being reported today include the following:

  • A woman in her 40’s who was a resident of the City of Mesquite. She had been critically ill in an area hospital, and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He expired in an area hospital ED, and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital, and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital, and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital, and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She expired in an area hospital ED, and did not have underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Mesquite. He had been critically ill in an area hospital, and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital, and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of the City of Richardson. He had been critically ill in an area hospital, and had underlying high risk health conditions

The provisional 7-day average daily new confirmed and probable cases (by date of test collection) for CDC week 35 has increased slightly from the previous week to 277. The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 remains high with 10.8% of symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals testing positive in week 35.

From August 15th through 28th, 317 school-aged children between 5 to 17 years of age were diagnosed with COVID-19 in Dallas County. About 43% of these cases were high school age (14 to 17 years). By zip code of residence, 167 (53%) of these children were projected to have been enrolled in Dallas ISD schools. Over the past 10 days, more than 25 possible cases of COVID-19 have been reported associated with multiple youth hockey teams in the DFW area.

Of all confirmed cases requiring hospitalization to date, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19. Of the total confirmed deaths reported to date, about 25% have been associated with long-term care facilities. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. There were 353 COVID-19 patients in acute care in Dallas County for the period ending on Tuesday, September 8. The number of emergency room visits for COVID-19 like symptoms in Dallas County was 411 for the 24 hour period ending on Tuesday, September 8, which represents around 18 percent of all emergency department visits in the county according to information reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council. While these numbers represent a significant decline from record highs in July, the disruptive impact of COVID-19 on our populations and health care systems remains. You can find additional information on risk-level monitoring data HERE.

“Today’s numbers are 376 and 266 of those numbers were from September but it’s unknown how many of those “new” cases were actually from tests in August. Our current median testing time is nine days with some of our labs taking longer than nine days and some labs taking less than nine days. Labs used by Dallas County and Parkland are taking about three days, so it’s hard to know how many of these cases are new. However, preliminarily, epidemiologists looking at date of test collection say that our downward trend in new COVID-19 cases has stopped and may be beginning to trend upward slightly. Therefore, it’s imperative that we all make good decisions. Please continue to wear your mask at all times when around people outside your home and maintain six foot distance. Remember, it’s not one or the other, it’s both. Also, wash your hands frequently and avoid unnecessary crowds and trips.

Recently, the TABC relaxed the rules for some bars and we are hearing more and more reports of crowded bars. We know that in every state that has left their bars open or reopened bars, they have seen a big spike in COVID-19 cases that increases infection and hurts other businesses and schools. The Public Health Committee, Dr. Huang and I strongly urge residents to avoid bars at this time. We also strongly encourage Governor Abbott to not loosen restrictions on bars and in fact, to close any loopholes that are allowing indoor gatherings at bars until the numbers are lower. If we all do our part, we have a good chance to get to a better place this fall but it is very easy to let our guard down and have the numbers jump in a short time. History has shown us that it takes months to get the numbers back down again. So please make your best decisions for you and your family, don’t let your guard down, and always wear your mask,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.



All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found HERE and all guidance documents can be found HERE.

UPDATED – Dallas County Health and Human Services Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Summary – September 8, 2020

Specific Guidance for the Public:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Avoid close contact outside your home: Put 6 feet of distance between yourself and people who don’t live in your household.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others and continue to keep about 6 feet between yourself and others. The cloth face cover is not a substitute for social distancing.
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands often and with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-base hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces daily using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash. If you do not have a tissue, use your sleeve, not your hands. Immediately wash your hands.
  • Monitor your health daily. Be alert for symptoms. Take your temperature and follow CDC guidance if symptoms develop.

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 139 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

The City of Duncanville is within Dallas County and Dallas County Health and Human Services is the lead agency in charge of gathering and reporting this information.


As of 1:00 pm September 8, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 139 additional confirmed cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total confirmed case count in Dallas County to 74,100 including 948 confirmed deaths. The total number of probable cases in Dallas County is 3,226, including 10 probable deaths from COVID-19. Of the 139 new cases we are reporting today, 63 came through the Texas Department of State Health Services’ (DSHS) electronic laboratory reporting (ELR) system, and all were from September. Please see a provisional breakdown below of these newly reported cases by date of collection:

Month# of positive patients
September63

The additional 3 deaths being reported today include the following:

  • A woman in her 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital, and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital, and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital, and had underlying high risk health conditions.

The provisional 7-day average daily new confirmed and probable cases (by date of test collection) for CDC week 35 has increased slightly from the previous week to 277. The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 remains high with 10.8% of symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals testing positive in week 35.

From August 15th through 28th, 317 school-aged children between 5 to 17 years of age were diagnosed with COVID-19 in Dallas County. About 43% of these cases were high school age (14 to 17 years). By zip code of residence, 167 (53%) of these children were projected to have been enrolled in Dallas ISD schools.

Of all confirmed cases requiring hospitalization to date, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19. Of the total confirmed deaths reported to date, about 25% have been associated with long-term care facilities. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays. Tuesday’s report is attached.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. Due to weekend reporting and the Labor Day holiday, new data will be available on Wednesday, September 9, 2020.

Additionally, Figure 1 and Table 11 below are from the September 8, 2020 Dallas County Health and Human Services 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Summary. Figure 1 shows the confirmed COVID-19 positive cases by date of test collection. This chart includes all delayed results that were received by DCHHS as of 8:00pm Monday. Table 11 is a summary of confirmed and probable cases and deaths over the past five weeks in Dallas County.

“Today we report a total of 139 new confirmed cases and three additional deaths. The lower number may be due to decreased reporting over the holiday weekend. Hopefully we won’t see a rise in cases from the holiday weekend if we all wore a mask, maintained six-foot distance, and avoided unnecessary trips and crowds. Today was the first day of school for Dallas ISD and many of our students here in Dallas County although many children experienced their first day of school this year online. With the decreasing numbers, I’m hopeful that more schools will be able to welcome back our youngest scholars soon, and if we keep the numbers down, that more and more kids will get the opportunity for in-person learning. It’s up to all of us for that to happen and the best way to keep our numbers trending lower is to wear a mask, maintain six-foot distancing, wash hands frequently, avoid unnecessary trips, and avoid places where people are not wearing their mask one hundred percent of the time,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.



All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found HERE and all guidance documents can be found HERE.

UPDATED – Dallas County Health and Human Services Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Summary – September 8, 2020

Specific Guidance for the Public:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Avoid close contact outside your home: Put 6 feet of distance between yourself and people who don’t live in your household.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others and continue to keep about 6 feet between yourself and others. The cloth face cover is not a substitute for social distancing.
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands often and with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-base hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces daily using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash. If you do not have a tissue, use your sleeve, not your hands. Immediately wash your hands.
  • Monitor your health daily. Be alert for symptoms. Take your temperature and follow CDC guidance if symptoms develop.

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Mosquito Spraying Scheduled For September 10 and 11

The City of Duncanville, at the recommendation and in cooperation with Dallas County Health and Human Services (DCHHS), will be conducting ground spraying against mosquitoes on Thursday, September 10 and Friday, September 11, between the hours of 9:00 PM and 5:00 AM, weather permitting. The spraying is being conducted in response to the detection of West Nile Virus in four mosquito traps located in the 75116 and 75137 zip codes. If the weather prohibits spraying on Thursday night, spraying will be conducted on Friday and Saturday nights. Spraying will be performed in targeted areas within the City of Duncanville (see the attached map).

Colors on map are meant to indicate areas where a trap
has tested positive for West Nile Virus.

City staff will continue to monitor areas where mosquito breeding is most likely to occur. To prevent the spread of mosquitoes, residents should remove all areas of standing water. Residents should also report all pools that are not well maintained and abandoned homes where mosquitoes are likely to breed to either City of Duncanville Health Services or Code Enforcement. Everyone should continue to protect themselves against the West Nile Virus by using insect repellent containing DEET. Citizens are also encouraged to remain indoors during dawn and dusk when mosquitoes are most active.

For more information on the scheduled ground mosquito spraying in Duncanville, contact Tammy Island at 972-707-4963.


FAQs

What pesticide is used for mosquito control?

Dallas County uses permethrin a synthetic pyrethroid commonly used in mosquito control programs due to its effectiveness. Permethrin has been registered by the EPA since 1979.

Can I opt-out of mosquito spraying?

Yes. Duncanville residents wanting to be on the no-spray list can email Tammy Island at tisland@duncanville.com at or Angelica Garcia at agarcia@duncanville.com to have your address added.

Mosquito Spraying Scheduled For September 3 and 4

The City of Duncanville, at the recommendation and in cooperation with Dallas County Health and Human Services (DCHHS), will be conducting ground spraying against mosquitoes on Thursday, September 3 and Friday, September 4, between the hours of 9:00 PM and 5:00 AM, weather permitting. The spraying is being conducted in response to the detection of West Nile Virus in one mosquito trap located in the 75116 zip code. If the weather prohibits spraying on Thursday night, spraying will be conducted on Friday and Saturday nights. Spraying will be performed in a targeted area within the City of Duncanville (see the attached map).

City staff will continue to monitor areas where mosquito breeding is most likely to occur. To prevent the spread of mosquitoes, residents should remove all areas of standing water. Residents should also report all pools that are not well maintained and abandoned homes where mosquitoes are likely to breed to either City of Duncanville Health Services or Code Enforcement. Everyone should continue to protect themselves against the West Nile Virus by using insect repellent containing DEET. Citizens are also encouraged to remain indoors during dawn and dusk when mosquitoes are most active.

For more information on the scheduled ground mosquito spraying in Duncanville, contact Tammy Island at 972-707-4963.


FAQs

What pesticide is used for mosquito control?

Dallas County uses permethrin a synthetic pyrethroid commonly used in mosquito control programs due to its effectiveness. Permethrin has been registered by the EPA since 1979.

Can I opt-out of mosquito spraying?

Yes. Duncanville residents wanting to be on the no-spray list can email Tammy Island at tisland@duncanville.com at or Angelica Garcia at agarcia@duncanville.com to have your address added.

Creepy-crawlies

Wicked Fun

Here we are in the middle of another Texas summer. Blistering heat and bugs flying about. In my yard I have many cicadas buzzing their summer song. I remember as a kid I would collect the skins and terrorize my slightly younger cousins with them. I would line the skins up and play whatever game with the husks that popped in my head. I’ve been trying to get my 9-year-old kid to pick them up and have his own adventures with cicada skins, but alas, he is creeped out by the brown husks. I recently found one hanging out on the mailbox. I brought it in with the day’s mail and watched my son cringe at me as usual. So, I went and put it on my husband’s shoulder. How hilarious it was to see him jump. The funny thing was that he saw me with the thing but was still startled when I placed it on his shoulder while he was watching TV.

And those who kill the fun…

Lately I’ve noticed these guys flying about.

Their coloring and size make you want to duck and run because they look like a wasp that means to hurt you, but apparently, they live to hunt cicadas for their young. I wanted to learn more about cicadas and their killers, so naturally I went to the library shelves for more information.

Books are the best for info

In Backyard Bugs by Jaret C. Daniels, I learned that the female cicada killer will deliver a powerful sting if provoked. They are the ones who hunt down cicadas, sting them, and bury them with the eggs they lay so that their young can feed on the cicada carcasses.

In The Songs of Insects by Lang Elliot and Wil Hershberger, I learned that the songs cicadas make are produced by special organs called “tymbals.” I also learned that the cicada eggs are laid in the bark of a tree, and the nymphs that hatch from the eggs fall to the ground and burrow to eat roots. The skins that are found all over the place are the last skin that they shed after they emerge from the ground.

Personally, I’d rather have the cicadas around and will try to eliminate their killers from my garden.

Come on by and check out our books on insects to learn more about the creepy crawlies and flying nuisances that are around your place.


As always, catch us on social media or comment below. If you have a library question, call 972-780-5052 or email librarians@duncanville.com.

Homeschooling, distance learning, and COVID-19

When my daughter’s school went to online learning, I felt the irony in my bones. As a child, I was homeschooled and assumed I would homeschool my own children. That had not happened, for various reasons, and my daughter thrived in first a public, then a charter school. And now… now she was learning at home.

It quickly became clear to me that homeschooling and distance learning were not the same, though many people used the term homeschooling for both. In distance learning, the school was still running the show, and in our situation the lessons seemed to rely heavily on online learning and worksheets. In homeschooling, the parent is in charge, and the curricula vary widely and wildly. I watched as the families of the United States learned the paradox of home versus classroom settings; with one or two students and none of the structure and social interactions of in-person school, the time required to finish assigned work shrinks. Through the still magical internet, I learned about the experiences of parents all over the US as their schools tried to adjust to the new situation, with varying degrees of success.

Summer passed by as normally as it could for the kiddos, while the adults goggled at the enormity of the local COVID-19 case numbers and the schools grappled with what to do in the fall. More and more parents with means, faced with the prospect of an indefinite length of distance learning, turned their eyes toward the possibility of homeschooling. Everyone faced what seemed like impossible decisions.

Staying in school

For those who stay in school, resources are available to help them navigate the system. You, Your Child, and School: Navigate Your Way to the Best Education by Sir Ken Robinson and Lou Aronica (2018) gives an overview of educational options and suggestions as to how to decide what is best and what steps to take going forward. Education a la Carte: Choosing the Best Schooling Options For Your Child by Kevin Leman (2017)and Rethinking School: How to Take Charge of Your Child’s Education by Susan Wise Bauer (2019) also discusses educational options and strategies to make things work best for your family, in whatever situation you find yourselves.

For those now tasked with distance learning, books like How to Tutor Your Own Child by Marina Koestler Ruben (2011) and Help Your Kids With Study Skills: A Unique Step-By-Step Visual Guide by Carol Vorderman (2016) may be helpful for parents helping their children at home. While written for college students, Cal Newport’s How to Become a Straight-A Student: The Unconventional Strategies Real College Students Use to Score High While Studying Less (2007) may be helpful for high school students as well. And of course, A Teen’s Guide to Getting Stuff Done by Jennifer Shannon (2017) may help high school students keep themselves on task.

While the local school districts are sailing new waters as they cope with the switch to distance learning, some public schools have existed as distance learning only options for several years. The Texas Education Agency lists public schools that are part of the Texas Virtual School Network at https://txvsn.org/OLS-Campuses.

The world of homeschooling 

With as many reasons for homeschooling as there are families who homeschool, there is no universal homeschool experience. My own homeschooling experience was fairly isolated, as my parents were conservative Christians who didn’t have money for things like homeschool co-ops. I spent much of my free time reading and…well, I became a history major and then a librarian! Others talk of spending lots of time in groups at co-ops or in sports leagues. In some states (though not Texas), homeschoolers can even participate in some public school classes.

Sometimes homeschooling is used by families to maintain a separation from the world that can even be unhealthy. I found echoes of my own experience in Devoted by Jennifer Mathieu (2015), which provides a glimpse into the world of a conservative Christian family through a daughter limited by its assigned gender roles. New York Times bestseller Educated (2018) is Tara Westover’s memoir of life in an abusive family which used “home schooling” in order to maintain their religiously-prompted isolation.

Of course, many people had a positive homeschooling experience, including Paula Penn-Nabrit, the author of Morning by Morning: How We Home-Schooled Our African American Sons to the Ivy League (2003).Rachel Gathercole discusses the social benefits of homeschooling in The Well-Adjusted Child (2007). Quinn Cummings shares her experience of exploring homeschooling in The Year of Learning Dangerously: Adventures in Homeschooling (2012). My own home education provided an excellent basic foundation for learning in high school and college.

Finding resources at the library

The library has many books on homeschooling—or home schooling, as it is spelled in the subject heading used in the records. Most of these books are found at 371.042.

Opposing Viewpoints is a series of books that gives both sides of a debate.

Some works focus on making the decision for whether or not to homeschool, including The Homeschooling Option by Lisa Rivera (2008). The Opposing Viewpoints volume Homeschooling (2010), edited by Noah Berlatsky, contains a variety of essays on many aspects of homeschooling’s pros and cons, including those unique to a Christian setting.

For those who decide to homeschool, many resources exist. Lorilee Lippincott’s The Homeschooling Handbook: How to Make Homeschooling Simple, Affordable, Fun, and Effective (2014) aims to make getting started easier. For those with younger children, The Brave Learner: Finding Everyday Magic in Homeschool, Learning, and Life, by Julie Bogart (2019), focuses on how to create an environment conducive to curiosity and wonder. For those with ambition and a love of the classics, The Well-Trained Mind by Susan Wise Bauer (2016) may be a source of inspiration. Using the classical (as in Greeks and Romans) framework of three learning stages, it gives a wealth of information and recommendations for education from pre-K through grade 12. And of course, a Google search will bring up a wealth of information and curriculum options. It is worth noting here that many homeschool curricula still have an evangelical Christian slant, especially in science.

No matter what decision parents make or are forced into in regard to education, we all agree that we want the best for our children. In these stressful times, hopefully that commonality will bring us together instead of apart.



As always, catch us on social media or comment below. If you have a library question, call 972-780-5052 or email librarians@duncanville.com.

Introducing Library Granola

Granola (that crunchy-munchy goodness) is made up of a lot of different ingredients.

This blog will be like granola; posts may vary in style and they’ll definitely vary in content.

Some posts might be straight-up book reviews. Others might be commentary on daily happenings. Still others will let you in on a few of the library’s secrets.

All of them will offer recommendations of items from our catalog. There will be links to take you to our catalog so you can sign in and place holds on the items you find most fascinating.

We hope our posts will entertain, inform, and inspire you. Leave us comments to let us know what you think and to share your ideas. You can also catch us on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter. Please keep your comments friendly and courteous. We reserve the right to delete any inappropriate comments.

If you have a library question, call 972-780-5052 or email librarians@duncanville.com.


Dallas County Reports 261 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

The City of Duncanville is within Dallas County and Dallas County Health and Human Services is the lead agency in charge of gathering and reporting this information.


As of 12:00 pm September 7, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 261 additional confirmed cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total confirmed case count in Dallas County to 73,961 including 946 confirmed deaths. The total number of probable cases in Dallas County is 3,184, including 10 probable deaths from COVID-19.

Of the 261 new cases we are reporting today, 177 came through the Texas Department of State Health Services’ (DSHS) electronic laboratory reporting (ELR) system, with most of the results coming from collection dates in September. Please see a provisional breakdown below of these newly reported cases by date of collection:

Month# of positive patients
August35
September142

The provisional 7-day average daily new confirmed and probable cases (by date of test collection) for CDC week 35 has increased slightly to 244. The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 has also increased, with 10.8% of symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals testing positive in week 35.

From August 15th through 28th, 317 school-aged children between 5 to 17 years of age were diagnosed with COVID-19 in Dallas County. About 43% of these cases were high school age (14 to 17 years). By zip code of residence, 167 (53%) of these children were projected to have been enrolled in Dallas ISD schools.

Of all confirmed cases requiring hospitalization to date, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

Of the total confirmed deaths reported to date, about 25% have been associated with long-term care facilities.

New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. Due to weekend reporting, new data will be available on Tuesday, September 8, 2020.

“I hope everyone had a fun and enjoyable Labor Day weekend; and celebrated the holiday responsibly by staying away from people in your family who were unmasked. If we did a good job this weekend, we shouldn’t see a big spike in two weeks, and we should continue to see improving numbers on COVID. Our next challenge is with the opening of schools. And, again, the key for success is for everyone to practice good safety. Masking is the most important component, along with six-foot distancing, handwashing, avoiding unnecessary crowds, and avoiding people who are not wearing their masks. If we all continue to work together for the good of the community, we’ll see less sickness and death, more businesses and jobs thrive, and more kids in school,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.



All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found HERE and all guidance documents can be found HERE.

UPDATED – Dallas County Health and Human Services Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Summary – August 28, 2020

Specific Guidance for the Public:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Avoid close contact outside your home: Put 6 feet of distance between yourself and people who don’t live in your household.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others and continue to keep about 6 feet between yourself and others. The cloth face cover is not a substitute for social distancing.
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands often and with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-base hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces daily using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash. If you do not have a tissue, use your sleeve, not your hands. Immediately wash your hands.
  • Monitor your health daily. Be alert for symptoms. Take your temperature and follow CDC guidance if symptoms develop.

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/