The week of March 25th has proven to be the best week for our tulips this year. Next week they will begin to decline and by week’s end all the white petals will likely be spent. So, get out and enjoy them while you can! Some citizens have expressed interest in obtaining the bulbs after the blooming season ends. Tulips are an annual flower in Texas as it does not stay cold enough for the bulbs to bloom again each year. However, the bulbs can be harvested and kept in a refrigerated climate until planting next winter. The city does not have the resources to refrigerate the bulbs but feels it is in the best interest of the city to allow individual citizens to do so if they desire as it only beautifies the entire city next season.

Free Tulip Bulbs

The Parks Department will be pulling the tulips and saving some of the bulbs for those citizens who want them the week of April 8 weather permitting. They can be picked up on a first come first serve basis at the Recreation Center Lobby starting the week of April 8 (weather permitting) during regular business hours while supplies last.

For convenience, residents can call ahead to make sure there are still tulip bulbs available: 972-780-5070

Tulip Bulb Care

Although tulips are bulbs, it is best to consider them as annuals here in Texas. Successive year’s blooms will be inferior, if present at all. Texas winters are too mild to give them the chilling they need to flower properly. To prevent drying out, store bulbs in dry peat moss, perlite, vermiculite or sand in a porous bag or shallow tray. Store them in a cool (35°-50°F), dry, well-ventilated area for replanting in the winter. Refrigerate the bulbs for at least six weeks prior to replanting.

Generally planted in Texas around Christmas or the first two weeks of January, tulips should be planted in sun or part shade six inches deep and four to six inches apart. Tulips look better when planted in clumps of three, five or seven. They require well-drained, fertilized soil. There are several “bulb boosters” or fertilizers available as well as the traditional bone meal. Mix any of these with soil in the bottom of the planting hole. For bigger, brighter blooms, use a liquid plant food in early spring.