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Updated 01-27-2021

THE COVID-19 VACCINE

Current COVID-19 Vaccine Status: LIMITED SUPPLY, vaccinating Phase 1A and 1B

Dallas County Health and Human Services is the lead agency responsible for providing information and guidance regarding COVID-19 to the City of Duncanville. The Duncanville Fire Department and Office of Emergency Management are actively engaged with daily calls and communication with DCHHS and other partners to ensure Duncanville has the latest updates and information regarding pandemic and evolving response.

The City of Duncanville is not providing COVID-19 vaccinations at this time. Please, visit the Dallas County website to find more information or register.

PHASE 1A

  • Healthcare Workers
  • Long-term Care Facility Residents

PHASE 1B

  • Persons Age 65+ and Older
  • Frontline Essential Workers
  • Persons 16+ with High-Risk Health Conditions

PHASE 1C

  • Essential frontline workers

PHASE 2

  • The general public

FAQ

Who can get a vaccine now?

Front-line healthcare workers and residents at long-term care facilities (called Phase 1A) plus people over 65 or with a chronic medical condition that puts them at increased risk for severe illness from COVID‑19 (called Phase 1B) are currently eligible to receive the COVID‑19 vaccine.

Phase 1B recipients include:

  • People 65 years of age and older
  • People 16 years of age and older with at least one chronic medical condition that puts them at increased risk for severe illness from the virus that causes COVID-19, such as but not limited to:
    • Cancer
    • Chronic kidney disease
    • COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease)
    • Down Syndrome
    • Heart conditions, such as heart failure, coronary artery disease or cardiomyopathies
    • Solid-organ transplantation
    • Obesity and severe obesity (body mass index of 30 kg/m2 or higher)
    • Pregnancy
    • Sickle cell disease
    • Type 2 diabetes mellitus

Where else can I go to get vaccinated?

Below is a list of other vaccine providers in both Dallas and Tarrant counties. If you have the opportunity to get vaccinated sooner at a different location, you are encouraged to do so.

Dallas City of Dallas (Kay Bailey Hutchinson Center) | Visit website
Dallas City of Garland Health Department | Visit website 972.205.3900
Tarrant Arlington Fire Department | Visit website 817.248.6299, option 7
Tarrant Tarrant County Public Health | Visit website 817.248.6299, option 7
Tarrant Texas Health Resources | Visit website 817.248.6299, option 7

What happens after I register for the vaccine?

  1. Visit the DCHHS  registration portal to get started on your journey
  2. Fill-out the detailed registration form
  3. Residents receive an email to confirm registration. The email will include FAQs to provide additional information
  4. Residents will be prioritized based on Texas DSHS criteria and will be contacted by one of three hubs (DCHHS, Parkland, UT Southwestern) to schedule their appointment usually by email
  5. During your appointment, receive a vaccination card that will include the date to return for the 2nd dose
  6. Return at the same time and location the first dose was received (appointments are not needed for the 2nd dose if you got your first dose at Fair Park)

What to Expect after Getting a COVID-19 Vaccine

From CDC.gov

COVID-19 vaccination will help protect you from getting COVID-19. You may have some side effects, which are normal signs that your body is building protection. These side effects may affect your ability to do daily activities, but they should go away in a few days.

Common side effects

On the arm where you got the shot:

  • Pain
  • Swelling

Throughout the rest of your body:

  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Tiredness
  • Headache

Helpful tips

If you have pain or discomfort, talk to your doctor about taking an over-the-counter medicine, such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen.

To reduce pain and discomfort where you got the shot:

  • Apply a clean, cool, wet washcloth over the area.
  • Use or exercise your arm.

To reduce discomfort from fever:

  • Drink plenty of fluids.
  • Dress lightly.

When to call the doctor

In most cases, discomfort from fever or pain is normal. Contact your doctor or healthcare provider:

  • If the redness or tenderness where you got the shot increases after 24 hours
  • If your side effects are worrying you or do not seem to be going away after a few days

About your second shot

Both COVID-19 mRNA vaccines will need 2 shots to get the most protection. The timing between your first and second shot depends on which vaccine you received. You should get your second shot:

  • for the Pfizer-BioNTech 3 weeks (or 21 days) after your first shot,
  • for the Moderna 1 month (or 28 days) after your first shot.

You should get your second shot as close to the recommended 3-week or 1-month interval as possible. However, there is no maximum interval between the first and second doses for either vaccine. You should not get the second dose earlier than the recommended interval. ​

Remember

  • Side effects may feel like flu and even affect your ability to do daily activities, but they should go away in a few days.
  • With most COVID-19 vaccines, you will need 2 shots in order for them to work. Get the second shot even if you have side effects after the first shot, unless a vaccination provider or your doctor tells you not to get a second shot.
  • It takes time for your body to build protection after any vaccination. COVID-19 vaccines that require 2 shots may not protect you until a week or two after your second shot.

It’s important for everyone to continue using all the tools available to help stop this pandemic as we learn more about how COVID-19 vaccines work in real-world conditions. Cover your mouth and nose with a mask when around others, stay at least 6 feet away from others, avoid crowds, and wash your hands often.​

Who gets vaccinated next?

According to the Texas Department of Health and Human Services: Spring 2021 is the best estimate of when vaccine will be available for the general public, but that may change. It depends on vaccine production and how quickly other vaccines become available. The Expert Vaccine Allocation Panel (EVAP) is considering what criteria could be used for later stages of vaccine distribution. This webpage will be updated when those decisions are completed.

Why is Duncanville not vaccinating residents?

At this time, the decision not to operate a vaccination site here in Duncanville, alone or in cooperation with neighboring Best Southwest cities, is informed by the current vaccine supply, trained staffing needs for site operations, which would reduce the city’s readiness for other emergencies, and a site’s requirement to serve all Texans and not just our residents. It was determined that assisting Dallas County at the Fair Park or Ellis Davis Field House locations was a better solution for helping more people get vaccinated.

PREVENTION

Wear a Mask to Prevent COVID-19

Wear a mask over your nose and mouth

  • Masks help prevent you from getting or spreading the virus.
  • You could spread COVID-19 to others even if you do not feel sick.
  • Everyone should wear a mask in public settings and when around people who don’t live in your household, especially when other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain.
    • Masks should not be placed on young children under age 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.
  • Do NOT use a mask meant for a healthcare worker. Currently, surgical masks and N95 respirators are critical supplies that should be reserved for healthcare workers and other first responders.
  • Continue to keep about 6 feet between yourself and others. The mask is not a substitute for social distancing.

Stay 6 feet away from others

Avoid crowds

  • Being in crowds like in restaurants, bars, fitness centers, or movie theaters put you at higher risk for COVID-19.

Avoid poorly ventilated spaces

  • Avoid indoor spaces that do not offer fresh air from the outdoors as much as possible. If indoors, bring in fresh air by opening windows and doors, if possible.
Wash your hands

Wash your hands often

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • It’s especially important to wash:
    • Before eating or preparing food
    • Before touching your face
    • After using the restroom
    • After leaving a public place
    • After blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing
    • After handling your mask
    • After changing a diaper
    • After caring for someone sick
    • After touching animals or pets
  • If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
cover coughs and sneezes

Cover coughs and sneezes

  • Always cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow and do not spit.
  • Throw used tissues in the trash.
  • Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, clean your hands with a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
clean and disinfect

Clean and disinfect