Governor Abbott Establishes Statewide Face Covering Requirement, Issues Proclamation To Limit Gatherings

Governor Greg Abbott today issued an Executive Order requiring all Texans to wear a face covering over the nose and mouth in public spaces in counties with 20 or more positive COVID-19 cases, with few exceptions. The Governor also issued a proclamation giving mayors and county judges the ability to impose restrictions on some outdoor gatherings of over 10 people, and making it mandatory that, with certain exceptions, people cannot be in groups larger than ten and must maintain six feet of social distancing from others. 

“Wearing a face covering in public is proven to be one of the most effective ways we have to slow the spread of COVID-19,” said Governor Abbott. “We have the ability to keep businesses open and move our economy forward so that Texans can continue to earn a paycheck, but it requires each of us to do our part to protect one another—and that means wearing a face covering in public spaces. Likewise, large gatherings are a clear contributor to the rise in COVID-19 cases. Restricting the size of groups gatherings will strengthen Texas’ ability to corral this virus and keep Texans safe. We all have a responsibility to slow the spread of COVID-19 and keep our communities safe. If Texans commit to wearing face coverings in public spaces and follow the best health and safety practices, we can both slow the spread of COVID-19 and keep Texas open for business. I urge all Texans to wear a face covering in public, not just for their own health, but for the health of their families, friends, and for all our fellow Texans.”


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 708 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

DALLAS — As of 11:00am July 2, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 708 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total case count in Dallas County to 22,590, including 387 deaths.

The additional 7 deaths being reported today include:

  • A man in his 40’s who was a resident of the City of Irving. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Irving. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been hospitalized.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 90’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.

An increasing proportion of COVID-19 cases in Dallas County are being diagnosed in young adults between 18 to 39 years of age, such that of all cases reported after June 1st, more than half have been in this age group. Over 54 confirmed COVID-19 cases in children and staff have been reported from 26 separate daycares in Dallas County since June 1st, including one staff member requiring ICU hospitalization. Increasing reports of cases are continuing to be associated with multiple large recreational and social gatherings since the beginning of June, including house parties. Of cases requiring hospitalization, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age, and about half do not have any high-risk chronic health conditions. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 increased to 26.9% of symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals in week 25. The age-adjusted rates of confirmed COVID-19 cases in non-hospitalized patients have been highest among Hispanics (667.4 per 100,000), Asians (187.4 per 100,000) and Blacks (136.4 per 100,000). These rates have been higher than Whites (43.8 per 100,000). Over 60% of overall COVID-19 cases to date have been Hispanic. Of cases requiring hospitalization who reported employment, over 80% have been critical infrastructure workers, with a broad range of affected occupational sectors, including: healthcare, transportation, food and agriculture, public works, finance, communications, clergy, first responders, and other essential functions.

Of the 387 total deaths reported to date, over a third have been associated with long-term care facilities. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. We continue to see record-high numbers of COVID-19 inpatients in Dallas County hospitals with 669 COVID-19 patients in acute care for the period ending Wednesday, July 1. Additionally, the number of emergency room visits for COVID-19 like symptoms in Dallas County continues to be high with 804 emergency room visits in the 24 hour period ending Wednesday, July 1, which represents 34 percent of all emergency department visits in Dallas County according to information reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council. These numbers not only reflect the impact on our health care facilities, but the danger this virus poses to individuals as increasing numbers of people are ending up in the hospital in need of care. You can find additional information on risk-level monitoring data here.

“Today we reached 700 new COVID-19 cases for the first time and 387 total deaths. It took 92 days to reach 300 COVID-19 cases and it has taken 22 days since then to reach 700. The situation we have right now is significant and accelerating community spread. We cannot afford another statewide letdown in our strong personal responsibility COVID-19 protection choices, so this 4th of July, celebrate with your nuclear family and avoid crowds and extended family gatherings. I realize this is disappointing for all of us but it’s up to all of us to #FlattenTheCurve and save lives, and the best way to do that is to avoid those crowds this holiday weekend and wear a mask if you are around anyone outside your family,” said Dallas County Judge Clay
Jenkins.


Dallas County Health and Human Services
2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID‐19) Summary for June 30, 2020

All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 544 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

DALLAS — As of 11:00am July 1, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 544 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total case count in Dallas County to 21,882, including 380 deaths.

The additional 7 deaths being reported today include:

  • A woman in her 20’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 40’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been hospitalized and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She was found deceased at home and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of DeSoto. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Seagoville. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.

An increasing proportion of COVID-19 cases in Dallas County are being diagnosed in young adults between 18 to 39 years of age, such that of all cases reported after June 1st, more than half have been in this age group. Over 54 confirmed COVID-19 cases in children and staff have been reported from 26 separate daycares in Dallas County since June 1st, including one staff member requiring ICU hospitalization. Increasing reports of cases are continuing to be associated with multiple large recreational and social gatherings since the beginning of June, including house parties. Of cases requiring hospitalization, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age, and about half do not have any high-risk chronic health conditions. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 increased to 26.9% of symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals in week 25. The age-adjusted rates of confirmed COVID-19 cases in non-hospitalized patients have been highest among Hispanics (667.4 per 100,000), Asians (187.4 per 100,000), and Blacks (136.4 per 100,000). These rates have been higher than Whites (43.8 per 100,000). Over 60% of overall COVID-19 cases to date have been Hispanic. Of cases requiring hospitalization who reported employment, over 80% have been critical infrastructure workers, with a broad range of affected occupational sectors, including healthcare, transportation, food and agriculture, public works, finance, communications, clergy, first responders, and other essential functions.

Of the 380 total deaths reported to date, over a third have been associated with long-term care facilities. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. We continue to see high numbers of COVID-19 inpatients in Dallas County hospitals with 532 COVID-19 patients in acute care for the period ending Tuesday, June 30. These numbers appear to be substantially lower due to an issue related to reporting and unfortunately, will likely increase once the number of reporting facilities returns to normal. Additionally, the number of emergency room visits for COVID-19 like symptoms in Dallas County continues to be high with 691 emergency room visits in the 24 hour period ending Tuesday, June 30, which represents 34 percent of all emergency department visits in Dallas County according to information reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council. These numbers not only reflect the impact on our health care facilities, but the danger this virus poses to individuals as increasing numbers of people are ending up in the hospital in need of care. You can find additional information on risk-level monitoring data here.

“Today’s seven deaths include a woman in her 20’s and a man in his 50’s with no underlying health conditions, a somber reminder of the dangerous nature of COVID-19 on everyone. Many people are making plans for the 4th of July weekend. We cannot afford another deviation from making good decisions like we saw during Easter/Passover and Memorial Day given the surge in cases we are now seeing.

It was nearly two months from the time I declared a state of emergency and instituted ‘Safer at Home,’ until the daily case numbers began to go down. It was over five weeks from the time the Governor stopped ‘Safer at Home,’ removed requirements, and began opening many more businesses before we began to see a large surge in cases. The only time we’ve seen huge change happen in less than a month has been the increase in the number of cases we saw two weeks after Easter/Passover and two weeks after Memorial Day. That must not happen for this weekend. If it does, our hospitals are at risk of being overrun later, many more people will get sick and die, and our economy will be set back for months.

Please celebrate the 4th of July with your families and only be around people that you are in close contact with daily. When you are around people other than your family, please wear a mask and keep six foot distance at all times. It’s going to be up to all of us to have a safer 4th of July weekend than we achieved together as a community for Easter/Passover and Memorial Day. Lives depend on it.

I need you, your family needs you, and your community needs you to make strong choices. If you lead a family, please ensure that everyone in your family practices a safe 4th of July by being around only those people you are in close contact with daily and wearing a mask and maintaining six foot distancing. Our Public Health Authority emphasizes that indoor gatherings should be limited to no more than 10 persons, and it is strongly encouraged that these groups be limited to close household members. At all times, please ensure everyone wears a mask and keeps six foot distancing. It’s up to all of us #FlattenTheCurve and the best way to do that is to #StayHomeStaySafe and #WearAMask,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.


Dallas County Health and Human Services
2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID‐19) Summary for June 30, 2020

All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Governor Abbott, HHSC Announce $9 Million for Nursing Facility Infection Control Projects to Prevent COVID-19

AUSTIN – Governor Greg Abbott and the Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) today announced $9 million in federal funding for nursing facilities to implement infection control projects to protect residents and staff from the spread of COVID-19. Starting July 1, nursing facility providers in Texas are encouraged to submit applications to HHSC to receive this federal funding.

“We know that older Texans are more susceptible to COVID-19, and Texas is committed to ensuring that nursing facilities have the tools they need to keep their residents and staff safe,” said Governor Abbott. “The resources available through this federal funding will help maintain infection control within these facilities. We must continue to protect our most vulnerable populations, mitigate the spread of COVID-19 in Texas, and protect public health.”

“Nursing facilities have this opportunity to apply for funding to enhance health and safety protections for the people they serve,” said David Kostroun, deputy executive commissioner for HHSC’s Regulatory Services Division. “During this unprecedented time, we are directing providers to pursue every avenue to mitigate the spread of this virus.”

Approved providers will be eligible to receive funds for infection control resources, including:

  • Thermometers and temperature scanning equipment for staff and residents
  • Decontamination and disinfecting systems
  • Plexiglass barriers or portable walls to ensure social distancing and droplet protection
  • N95 fit-test equipment
  • Microbe-resistant flooring and wall coverings

For more details on how to apply, visit the Texas HHS website. The deadline for applications is August 30.

HHSC is continuing to accept applications for communication technology in nursing facilities, which are eligible to receive up to $3,000 per facility to purchase devices (e.g. iPads, tablets, webcams) and accessories (e.g. headphones, protective covers).  HHSC is allocating Civil Money Penalty (CMP) funds for this project as well as the infection control projects. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) imposes CMPs against Medicare- or Medicaid-certified nursing facilities found out of compliance with federal requirements. CMP funds can be used for projects and activities that benefit nursing facility residents by improving their quality of care or quality of life. Currently, HHSC is only accepting and reviewing applications for projects related to addressing COVID-19, such as infection control practices and communication technology.


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 601 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

DALLAS — As of 11:00 am June 30, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 601 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total case count in Dallas County to 21,338, including 373 deaths.

The additional 20 deaths being reported today include:

  • A man in his 30’s who was a resident of the City of Richardson. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 30’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He was found deceased at home and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 40’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 40’s who was a resident of the City of Irving. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 40’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He expired in an area hospital ED and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Balch Springs. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Seagoville. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Garland. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He expired in an area hospital ED and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He expired in an area hospital ED and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. She was found deceased at home and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He expired in an area hospital ED and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions
  • A woman in her 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 90’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. She had been hospitalized and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 90’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.

An increasing proportion of COVID-19 cases in Dallas County are being diagnosed in young adults between 18 to 39 years of age, such that of all cases reported after June 1st, more than half have been in this age group. Increasing reports of cases are continuing to be associated with multiple large recreational and social gatherings since the beginning of June, including house parties. Of cases requiring hospitalization, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age, and about half do not have any high-risk chronic health conditions. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 increased to 26.9% of symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals in week 25. The age-adjusted rates of confirmed COVID-19 cases in non-hospitalized patients have been highest among Hispanics (667.4 per 100,000), Asians (187.4 per 100,000), and Blacks (136.4 per 100,000). These rates have been higher than Whites (43.8 per 100,000). Over 60% of overall COVID-19 cases to date have been Hispanic. Of cases requiring hospitalization who reported employment, over 80% have been critical infrastructure workers, with a broad range of affected occupational sectors, including healthcare, transportation, food and agriculture, public works, finance, communications, clergy, first responders, and other essential functions.

Of the 373 total deaths reported to date, over a third have been associated with long-term care facilities. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and
Fridays. Tuesday’s summary is attached.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. We continue to see record-high numbers of COVID-19 inpatients in Dallas County hospitals with 619 COVID-19 patients in acute care for the period ending Monday, June 29. Additionally, the number of emergency room visits for COVID-19 like symptoms in Dallas County continues to be high with 634 emergency room visits in the 24 hour period ending Monday, June 29, which represents 32 percent of all emergency department visits in Dallas County according to information reported to the North Central
Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council. These numbers not only reflect the impact on our health care facilities, but the danger this virus poses to individuals as increasing numbers of people are ending up in the hospital in need of care. You can find additional information on risk-level monitoring data here.

“Today we’ve surpassed 600 new cases of COVID-19 for the first time, having surpassed 300 cases only 20 days ago. Additionally, this is our deadliest day thus far in the outbreak. Twenty residents are being reported as COVID-19 casualties today, exceeding our previous high of 16 deaths. Finally, our hospitalization numbers continue to increase. Local COVID-19 hospitalizations yesterday were at an all-time high of 619 compared to 296 30 days ago. And regionally, yesterday was an all-time high of 1340 compared to 615 30 days ago.

The time for decisive action was several weeks ago but we must move immediately to a statewide masking order. Goldman Sachs estimates that a national masking order would save the economy a trillion dollars.
When you divide that by the population of Texas, we can save $87 billion dollars to our economy, and countless lives by all wearing a mask. We need this to be a statewide requirement and I am again calling on Governor Abbott to make masks the law throughout Texas.

“Similarly, the doctors are strongly recommending that indoor crowds be kept to 10 or less people and that we close bowling alleys, arcades, concerts, movie theaters, gyms (to include yoga and spin studios, etc.), group youth sports, public pools, day camps, and other social venues or activities that do not allow strict physical distancing or masks to be worn 100 percent of the time. Under the doctors’ recommendations, take-out, delivery, and patio dining with strict distancing would still be allowed but they are requesting indoor restaurant dining to be suspended for the time being. These are small prices to pay to save lives and keep our economy going.

“Lives depend on swift action, not only from our state leaders, but from all of you in making good, strong decisions. Please wear a mask whenever you are around others outside your home, avoid unnecessary trips because we know that #StayHomeSavesLives, maintain six foot distancing, and use good hygiene at all times. The 4th of July is quickly approaching, and with it, an opportunity for us to let our guard down again and exacerbate what is already a quickly worsening problem. We can’t let that happen. Together we can defeat COVID-19, but it takes all of us working together and protecting one another as we protect ourselves,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.


Dallas County Health and Human Services
2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID‐19) Summary for June 30, 2020

All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

CENSUS BUREAU ACTIVATES ADDITIONAL OPERATIONS TO ENSURE ACCURATE 2020 CENSUS COUNT

Households May Receive Calls or In-Person Visits Over Next Several Months

June 30, 2020 – With about 4 in 10 households having yet to respond to the 2020 Census, the U.S. Census Bureau today announced it is on track to conduct multiple follow-up activities aimed at ensuring a complete and accurate count. Census Bureau staff will conduct the following operations over the next several months:

Coverage Improvement: The Census Bureau began making follow-up calls to some households that have already completed the 2020 Census. The goal is to make sure everyone in a household was counted, and to validate information provided when they completed the census questionnaire. Census call center agents began making calls on April 22. If the household does not answer a call, agents will leave a voicemail with a 12-digit ID as a reference number. This effort is set to continue through the end of the response phase on October 31.

Nonresponse Followup: The Census Bureau routinely “soft launches” operations to ensure systems, operations and field plans work as they should. Starting in mid-July, census takers from six area census offices (one per Census Bureau region) will begin the operation of interviewing households that have yet to respond to the 2020 Census. The six area census offices will be announced by the beginning of July. Additional area census offices may be announced for a second wave soft launch to occur later in July. Aside from area census offices that are part of a soft launch, the remaining area census offices will begin the Nonresponse Followup on August 11 and conclude no later than October 31. All census takers will be trained on social distancing protocols. They will be issued personal protective equipment (PPE) and follow local guidelines for their use.

Nonresponse Followup Reinterview: In some cases, a second census taker may visit a household to conduct a short interview to ensure the quality of our data collection activities. These reinterviews are meant to confirm every census taker followed our training and did their jobs correctly. The reinterview will be conducted by a different census taker than the one who originally visited the household. The Nonresponse Followup Reinterview operation is scheduled to run from August 12 to October 31.

Post-Enumeration Survey: After a household has already completed the 2020 Census, census takers will visit a select number of households as part of the Post-Enumeration Survey. The Census Bureau conducts this survey to measure the coverage of housing units and people residing in housing units in the 2020 Census. To that end, census takers will gather the following information:

Current residents of the housing unit.

People living in the household who may or may not have been there April 1 (Census Day).

People who moved out of the household between April 1 and the time of the interview.

The information collected for each person includes name, sex, age, date of birth, race, relationship to householder, and Hispanic origin. The interviewer also collects information about alternate addresses to establish where people lived on Census Day, according to census residence rules. Post-Enumeration Survey interviews are set to take place September 23 to December 22.

The Census Bureau urges the small percentage of households that are contacted during the Nonresponse Followup Reinterview and Post-Enumeration Survey operations to take a few minutes with the census taker to help ensure the quality of the 2020 Census.

All census takers have official ID badges that include their name, photograph, a U.S. Department of Commerce watermark, and an expiration date.

The Census Bureau conducts all operations with two key principles in mind: (1) protecting the health and safety of our staff and the public, and (2) fulfilling our statutory requirement to deliver the 2020 Census counts to the president on schedule. We are working closely with national, state, and local health authorities to ensure all of their guidance is incorporated into our operations.

The U.S. Constitution mandates a census of the population every 10 years. Census statistics help determine the number of seats each state holds in the U.S. House of Representatives and how billions of dollars in federal funds will be allocated to states and communities for the next 10 years.

For more information, visit 2020census.gov.

Dallas County Reports 572 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

As of 11:00 am June 29, 2020, DCHHS is reporting 572 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total case count in Dallas County to 20,737, including 353 deaths. 

The additional death being reported today is of a man in his 40’s who was a resident of Irving. He had not been critically ill nor was he admitted to an area hospital, but he did have underlying high-risk health conditions.

An increasing proportion of COVID-19 cases in Dallas County are being diagnosed in young adults between 18 to 39 years of age, such that of all cases reported after June 1st, more than half have been in this age group.

Increasing reports of cases are continuing to be associated with multiple large recreational and social gatherings since the beginning of June, including house parties.

Of cases requiring hospitalization, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age, and about half do not have any high-risk chronic health conditions. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 increased to 26.9% of symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals in week 25.

The age-adjusted rates of confirmed COVID-19 cases in non-hospitalized patients have been highest among Hispanics (667.4 per 100,000), Asians (187.4 per 100,000) and Blacks (136.4 per 100,000). These rates have been higher than Whites (43.8 per 100,000).   Over 60% of overall COVID-19 cases to date have been Hispanic.

Of cases requiring hospitalization who reported employment, over 80% have been critical infrastructure workers, with a broad range of affected occupational sectors, including: healthcare, transportation, food and agriculture, public works, finance, communications, clergy, first responders and other essential functions.

Of the 353 total deaths reported to date, over a third have been associated with long-term care facilities.

New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays.


Dallas County Health and Human Services
2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID‐19) Summary for June 26, 2020

All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

DUNCANVILLE CANCELS JULY 4th EVENT AND FIREWORKS DISPLAY

Duncanville, Texas – At their May 19th, 2020 regular meeting the Duncanville City Council made the decision to cancel this year’s July 4th event and fireworks display in the interests of public health and safety.

With nearby cities canceling their own Independence Day events, a Duncanville event was a potential attraction to people from outside the City at a time when all efforts are being taken to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19).

After a discussion about possible solutions that would allow the event to continue, Mayor Barry L. Gordon and the City Council agreed that, while disappointing, it was in the best interests of public health and safety to cancel the event.

“It was a painful decision for us as a council,” said Mayor Gordon of the cancellation. “We understand how enjoyable this community event is. It’s a hallmark event for the city. Regrettably, extraordinary times require extraordinary measures. We regret we can’t have fireworks this year.”

At the time of the meeting, Dallas County had identified the COVID-19 pandemic risk level as high, “Stay Home, Stay Safe.” At the state and federal levels, the government is still recommending the use of cloth face coverings, 6-foot social distancing, and limiting group sizes.

The Mayor closed the discussion saying, “We’ll do something bigger and better next year, hopefully.”


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 570 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

DALLAS — As of 11:00 am June 28, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 570 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) and one death bringing the total case count in Dallas County to 20,165, including 352 deaths.

The additional death being reported today is of a man in his 80’s who was a resident of the City of Irving. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.

  • An increasing proportion of COVID-19 cases in Dallas County are being diagnosed in young adults between 18 to 39 years of age, such that of all cases reported after June 1st, more than half have been in this age group.
  • Increasing reports of cases are continuing to be associated with multiple large recreational and social gatherings since the beginning of June, including house parties.
  • Of cases requiring hospitalization, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age, and about half do not have any high-risk chronic health conditions. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19.
  • The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 increased to 26.9% of symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals in week 25.
  • The age-adjusted rates of confirmed COVID-19 cases in non-hospitalized patients have been highest among Hispanics (667.4 per 100,000), Asians (187.4 per 100,000), and Blacks (136.4 per 100,000). These rates have been higher than Whites (43.8 per 100,000). Over 60% of overall COVID-19 cases to date have been Hispanic.
  • Of cases requiring hospitalization who reported employment, over 80% have been critical infrastructure workers, with a broad range of affected occupational sectors, including healthcare, transportation, food and agriculture, public works, finance, communications, clergy, first responders, and other essential functions.
  • Of the 352 total deaths reported to date, over a third have been associated with long-term care facilities.
  • New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. We continue to see record-high numbers of COVID-19 inpatients in Dallas County hospitals with 571 COVID-19 patients in hospitals for the period ending Friday, June 26. Additionally, the number of emergency room visits for COVID-19 like symptoms in Dallas County continues to be high with 694 emergency room visits in the 24-hour period ending Friday, June 25, which represents 29 percent of all emergency department visits in Dallas County according to information reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council. These numbers reflect an ongoing increase and impact on our acute care facilities. You can find additional information on risk-level monitoring data here.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. Due to weekend reporting, new data will be available on Tuesday, June 30, 2020. You can find additional information on risk-level monitoring data here.

“Today is the first day of a new week and we start with a new record of 570 COVID-19 positive cases. The more important number is hospitalizations, which has doubled this month and is the best indicator of the wide community spread we are experiencing. Attached is a letter that I sent to the Governor with recommendations from our most knowledgeable local health experts asking him to take action to control the spread here. Please do not wait for these actions to take place. Read the letter and act as if they have taken place in conducting your own affairs. Do not go to the type of establishments that our public health doctors are saying are unsafe. Stay at home except for essential business trips and wear a mask when outside the home and around other people,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.


Dallas County Health and Human Services
2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID‐19) Summary for June 26, 2020

All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 561 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

DALLAS — As of 11:00 am June 27, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 561 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) and 7 deaths, bringing the total case count in Dallas County to 19,595, including 351 deaths.

The additional 7 deaths being reported today include:

  • A man in his 40’s who was a resident of the City of Irving. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Farmers Branch. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Irving. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 90’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Seagoville. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. We continue to see record-high numbers of COVID-19 inpatients in Dallas County hospitals with 571 COVID-19 patients in hospitals for the period ending Friday, June 26. Additionally, the number of emergency room visits for COVID-19 like symptoms in Dallas County continues to be high with 694 emergency room visits in the 24-hour period ending Friday, June 25, which represents 29 percent of all emergency department visits in Dallas County according to information reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council. These numbers reflect an ongoing increase and impact on our acute care facilities. You can find additional information on risk-level monitoring data here.

“Today marks the highest amount of new cases that we have seen at 561 and ends our highest weekly average of new cases at 451 up from last week’s average of 358. We have 38 deaths this week. More importantly, we are at a record high for COVID-19 positives having doubled the amount of Dallas County residents in the hospital with COVID-19 during the month of June.

I am calling on the Governor to enact a statewide or at least regional masking law, reinstitute ‘Safer at Home’ for a period of 30 days, and close certain indoor businesses where masks cannot be worn 100 percent of the time. Further, in-restaurant dining should be discouraged. If you must eat at a restaurant, please eat on the patio, but health professionals recommend take out or delivery services during this time of the surge.

It is imperative that we all wear our masks outside of our homes and around other people. It’s up to all of us to flatten the curve and the best way to do that is to #wearamask and #stayhomesavelives,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.


Dallas County Health and Human Services
2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID‐19) Summary for June 26, 2020

All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/