Dallas County Reports 1,055 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

DALLAS — As of 11:00am July 15, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 1,055 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total case count in Dallas County to 36,969, including 485 deaths.

The additional 8 deaths being reported today include:

  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Grand Prairie. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Mesquite. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Duncanville. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 90’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.

An increasing proportion of COVID-19 cases in Dallas County are being diagnosed in young adults between 18 to 39 years of age, such that of all cases reported after June 1st, half have been in this age group. Reports of cases are continuing to be associated with multiple large recreational and social gatherings since the beginning of June. Of the cases requiring hospitalization to date, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 was 30% among symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals in week 27. Of cases requiring hospitalization who reported employment, over 80% have been critical infrastructure workers, with a broad range of affected occupational sectors, including healthcare, transportation, food and agriculture, public works, finance, communications, clergy, first responders, and other essential functions.

Of the 485 total deaths reported to date, about a third have been associated with long-term care facilities. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. We continue to see high numbers of COVID-19 patients in Dallas County with 648 people in acute care for the period ending Tuesday, July 14. Additionally, the number of emergency room visits for COVID-19 like symptoms in Dallas County was 646 in the 24 hour period ending Tuesday, July 14, which represents nearly 35 percent of all emergency department visits in the county according to information reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council. These numbers do show a bit of a decrease, but we again believe that is from a reporting issue. Overall the impact on our hospitals and providers remains high. You can find additional information on risk-level monitoring data here.

“The eight deaths we experienced today make it clear that by the time this week is over on Saturday, that this will be one of our deadliest weeks so far. I again urge Governor Abbott to enact the reasonable, businessfriendly suggestions from the medical community that we sent him three weeks ago and have again urged him to enact since that time. Essentially, that request is to close in-restaurant dining and businesses like cigar bars where 100% mask wearing is not possible at all times. The longer we wait to enact these modest restrictions, the worse things will become and the more likely it is that more damage to the public health and the economy will occur.

In the meantime, doctors and I strongly encourage you not to frequent businesses where masks cannot be worn 100% of the time or where there are high-touch surfaces. In addition to in-restaurant dining, these include the following: gyms, day camps, arcades, movie theaters, bowling alleys, amusement parks, concert venues, sporting arenas, group youth sports, public pools, weddings or other large events or venues. It’s up to all of us to #FlattenTheCurve and the best way to do that is to go to www.DallasCountyCOVID.org and download the medical expert recommendations of how to conduct yourself in this time of COVID-19.

Lastly, it’s imperative that we all wear our masks everywhere outside of our home or in our home when anyone who is not a resident of that home is present. It’s also important that if anyone comes to our home, that they wear their mask the entire time that they are there, and if people are doing activities where mask wearing is not possible, such as eating, that they maintain well over a six foot distance. We will get through this North Texas, and we’ll get through it faster and with less sickness, death, and damage to our economy, if we all follow the science. Again, please go to www.DallasCountyCOVID.org and download the information to keep yourself safe,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.


Dallas County Health and Human Services
2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID‐19) Summary for July 10, 2020

Click images to enlarge.

All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 1,000 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

DALLAS — As of 11:00 am July 14, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 1,000 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total case count in Dallas County to 35,914, including 477 deaths.

The additional 20 deaths being reported today include:

  • A man in his 40’s who was a resident of the City of Grand Prairie. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 40’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Duncanville. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Duncanville. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Cedar Hill. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 80’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 90’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.

An increasing proportion of COVID-19 cases in Dallas County are being diagnosed in young adults between 18 to 39 years of age, such that of all cases reported after June 1st, half have been in this age group. Reports of cases are continuing to be associated with multiple large recreational and social gatherings since the beginning of June, including house parties. Of the cases requiring hospitalization to date, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 was 30% among symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals in week 27. Of cases requiring hospitalization who reported employment, over 80% have been critical infrastructure workers, with a broad range of affected occupational sectors, including: healthcare, transportation, food and agriculture, public works, finance, communications, clergy, first responders and other essential functions.

Of the 477 total deaths reported to date, about a third have been associated with long-term care facilities. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays. Tuesday’s report is attached.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. We continue to see high numbers of COVID-19 patients in Dallas County with 730 people in acute care for the period ending Monday, July 13. Additionally, the number of emergency room visits for COVID-19 like symptoms in Dallas County was 584 in the 24 hour period ending Monday, July 13, which represents around 32 percent of all emergency department visits in the county according to information reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council. These numbers do show a bit of a decrease, but we believe that is in part from a reporting issue. Overall the impact on our hospitals and providers remains high. You can find additional information on risk-level monitoring data here.

“We unfortunately are reporting the deaths of 20 more of our county residents today, and with another day of 1,000 cases, we continue to see significant spread in Dallas County. Our hospitals and healthcare heroes are feeling the strain as COVID-19 hospitalizations remain high. Please continue to wear a mask when around others outside your home and maintain six foot distancing.

For those wondering what’s safe for you and your family, please go to www.DallasCountyCOVID.org to find guidance on things like going to restaurants, attending events, visiting public swimming pools and more. This guidance was put together by leaders in public health, infectious disease and epidemiology and their recommendations are based on our current level of community spread in the county. We’re currently in the ‘Stay Home Stay Safe’ red category and doctors recommend you limit trips to just necessities,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.


Dallas County Health and Human Services
2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID‐19) Summary for July 10, 2020

Click images to enlarge.

All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 1,114 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

DALLAS — As of 11:00am July 13, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 1,114 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total case count in Dallas County to 34,914, including 457 deaths.

The additional 6 deaths being reported today include:

  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have any underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have any underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of DeSoto. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have any underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 90’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Mesquite. She passed away in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.

An increasing proportion of COVID-19 cases in Dallas County are being diagnosed in young adults between 18 to 39 years of age, such that of all cases reported after June 1st, half have been in this age group. Increasing reports of cases are continuing to be associated with multiple large recreational and social gatherings since the beginning of June, including house parties. Of the cases requiring hospitalization to date, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 was 30% among symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals in week 27. The age-adjusted rates of confirmed COVID-19 cases in non-hospitalized patients have been highest among Hispanics (667.4 per 100,000), Asians (187.4 per 100,000), and Blacks (136.4 per 100,000). These rates have been higher than Whites (43.8 per 100,000). Over 60% of overall COVID-19 cases to date have been Hispanic. Of cases requiring hospitalization who reported employment, over 80% have been critical infrastructure workers, with a broad range of affected occupational sectors, including healthcare, transportation, food and agriculture, public works, finance, communications, clergy, first responders, and other essential functions.

Of the 457 total deaths reported to date, about a third have been associated with long-term care facilities. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. Due to weekend reporting, new data will be available on Tuesday, July 14, 2020. You can find additional information on risk-level monitoring data here.

“We continue to see over 1,000 new positive COVID-19 cases each day and we know there is still rampant community spread of this virus. It has been just over four months since we reported our first case in Dallas County and I know everyone is ready to find some sense of normalcy, even if that means our ‘new normal.’ However, you are much more likely now to come into contact with someone who has the virus than you were a few months ago during the Safer at Home orders. Whenever you leave your house, please take your mask, and wear it whenever you go in a store or business and whenever you are within six feet of someone outside your home. Remember, my mask protects you and your mask protects me. We are in this together and we will get through this together,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.


Dallas County Health and Human Services
2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID‐19) Summary for July 10, 2020

Click images to enlarge.

All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 1,174 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

DALLAS — As of 11:00am July 12, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 1,174 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total case count in Dallas County to 33,800, including 451 deaths.

The additional 2 deaths being reported today include:

  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital, and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital, and had underlying high risk health conditions.

An increasing proportion of COVID-19 cases in Dallas County are being diagnosed in young adults between 18 to 39 years of age, such that of all cases reported after June 1st, half have been in this age group. Increasing reports of cases are continuing to be associated with multiple large recreational and social gatherings since the beginning of June, including house parties. Of the cases requiring hospitalization to date, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 was 30% among symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals in week 27. The age-adjusted rates of confirmed COVID-19 cases in non-hospitalized patients have been highest among Hispanics (667.4 per 100,000), Asians (187.4 per 100,000) and Blacks (136.4 per 100,000). These rates have been higher than Whites (43.8 per 100,000). Over 60% of overall COVID-19 cases to date have been Hispanic. Of cases requiring hospitalization who reported employment, over 80% have been critical infrastructure workers, with a broad range of affected occupational sectors, including: healthcare, transportation, food and agriculture, public works, finance, communications, clergy, first responders and other essential functions.

Of the 451 total deaths reported to date, about a third have been associated with long-term care facilities. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. Due to weekend reporting, new data will be available on Tuesday, July 14, 2020. You can find additional information on risk-level monitoring data here.

“We can stop the surge of cases going higher if we all take responsibility and make our best choices. You focus on the micro-level, and by that I mean focus on your family and your circle, and let our team focus on the macro-level. You can get guidance in a color-coded cheat sheet chart as to what doctors currently recommend for your family at www.DallasCountyCOVID.org. Please always take your mask with you when leaving the home, even if you’re going on a walk and carrying it in your pocket. You never know when you’ll be around others. Always wear your mask when you’re within six feet of people outside your family or when traveling inside of any building other than your home. We can do this North Texas, but it takes all of us,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.


Dallas County Health and Human Services
2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID‐19) Summary for July 10, 2020

Click images to enlarge.

All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 1,101 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

DALLAS – As of 11:00 a.m. July 11, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 1,101 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) and four additional deaths, bringing the total case count in Dallas County to 32,626, including 449 deaths. 

The additional 4 deaths being reported today include:

  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Carrollton. He had been critically ill in an area hospital, and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been hospitalized, and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Mesquite. She had been hospitalized, and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 90’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Richardson. She expired in the facility, and had underlying high risk health conditions.

An increasing proportion of COVID-19 cases in Dallas County are being diagnosed in young adults between 18 to 39 years of age, such that of all cases reported after June 1st, half have been in this age group.

Increasing reports of cases are continuing to be associated with multiple large recreational and social gatherings since the beginning of June, including house parties.

Of the cases requiring hospitalization to date, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 was 30% among symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals in week 27.

The age-adjusted rates of confirmed COVID-19 cases in non-hospitalized patients have been highest among Hispanics (667.4 per 100,000), Asians (187.4 per 100,000) and Blacks (136.4 per 100,000). These rates have been higher than Whites (43.8 per 100,000).   Over 60% of overall COVID-19 cases to date have been Hispanic.

Of cases requiring hospitalization who reported employment, over 80% have been critical infrastructure workers, with a broad range of affected occupational sectors, including: healthcare, transportation, food and agriculture, public works, finance, communications, clergy, first responders and other essential functions.

Of the 449 total deaths reported to date, about a third have been associated with long-term care facilities.

New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays.


Dallas County Health and Human Services
2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID‐19) Summary for July 10, 2020

Click images to enlarge.

All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 1,164 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

DALLAS — As of 11:00am July 10, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 1,164 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total case count in Dallas County to 31,525, including 445 deaths.

The additional 9 deaths being reported today include:

  • A man in his 40’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. She expired in an area hospital ED and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He expired in an area hospital ED and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Irving. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 90’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. She had been critically ill in an area hospital.
  • A woman in her 90’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.

An increasing proportion of COVID-19 cases in Dallas County are being diagnosed in young adults between 18 to 39 years of age, such that of all cases reported after June 1st, half have been in this age group. Increasing reports of cases are continuing to be associated with multiple large recreational and social gatherings since the beginning of June, including house parties. Of the cases requiring hospitalization to date, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 was 30% among symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals in week 27. The age-adjusted rates of confirmed COVID-19 cases in non-hospitalized patients have been highest among Hispanics (667.4 per 100,000), Asians (187.4 per 100,000), and Blacks (136.4 per 100,000). These rates have been higher than Whites (43.8 per 100,000). Over 60% of overall COVID-19 cases to date have been Hispanic. Of cases requiring hospitalization who reported employment, over 80% have been critical infrastructure workers, with a broad range of affected occupational sectors, including healthcare, transportation, food and agriculture, public works, finance, communications, clergy, first responders, and other essential functions.

Of the 445 total deaths reported to date, about a third have been associated with long-term care facilities. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays. Friday’s summary is attached.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. We continue to see high numbers of COVID-19 patients in Dallas County with 809 people in acute care for the period ending Thursday, July 9. Additionally, the number of emergency room visits for COVID-19 like symptoms in Dallas County was 757 in the 24 hour period ending Thursday, July 9, which represents close to 35 percent of all emergency department visits in the county according to information reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council. These high numbers of COVID-19 patients strain our current health care facilities and detract from other needed health care services. You can find additional information on risk-level monitoring data here.

“Today’s numbers continue the trend that we are seeing. Governor Abbott is now on record agreeing with me that things will get worse before they get better. It’s imperative that we all wear our masks 100 percent of the time when we are around other people outside of our own family. If you suspect that you are ill, wear your mask 100 percent of the time, even in your own home. Remember, your mask protects others and their mask protects you.

In the workplace, it’s very important to wear our mask. If someone turns out to be sick in the workplace and 100 percent masking protocol has not been utilized, then you can have a situation where several people must go home and isolate even though they’re not feeling sick, all because one person was COVID-19 positive. However, if distancing and masking is used 100 percent of the time, group lunches are avoided, and shared tools are avoided 100 percent of the time, then only the person who is sick will need to isolate because they won’t have any close contacts. Close contacts are defined as those that are unmasked and within 6 feet for a total cumulative time of 10-15 minutes or more, while around someone with COVID-19 during the time they were symptomatic or 48 hours before they showed symptoms.

Restaurants continue to be a major source of concern for the medical community as are all venues where masks cannot be worn 100 percent of the time. Please do not frequent any venue where masks cannot be worn by everyone 100 percent of the time. It’s up to all of us to #FlattenTheCurve and the best way to do that is to #StayHomeSaveLives. When you must leave your home, leave it only for work and necessities, including exercising at a safe distance. Even when you don’t think you’ll be around other people, please take a mask with you because you never know when interactions will occur and you’ll need to put your mask on.

Finally, don’t touch the front of your mask. Proper mask etiquette is attached. If you touch the front of your mask where you’re sucking in all the air around you, that’s the dirtiest part of the mask and the dirtiest part of anything on your body, and then if you touch your eyes or your nose, you can infect yourself that way. So it’s important that we all use good mask protocols all the time,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.


Dallas County Health and Human Services
2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID‐19) Summary for July 10, 2020

Click images to enlarge.

All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Governor Abbott Issues Proclamation Expanding Hospital Capacity In 11 Trauma Service Areas

July 9, 2020 | Austin, Texas | Press Release

Governor Greg Abbott today issued a Proclamation suspending elective surgeries in hospitals in all counties located within 11 Trauma Service Areas (TSAs) in Texas. Previously, Governor Abbott suspended elective surgeries at hospitals in the counties of Bexar, Cameron, Dallas, Harris, Hidalgo, Nueces, Travis, and Webb.

“The State of Texas continues to implement strategies to help ensure ample supply of hospital beds for COVID-19 patients,” said Governor Abbott. “By expanding this directive to include the counties within these 11 TSAs, we are freeing up more resources to address upticks in COVID-19 related cases. The State of Texas will continue to do everything we can to mitigate the spread of this virus and support our hospitals and health care professionals as they care for their fellow Texans. We must all come together and continue to practice social distancing, wear a face-covering in public, and stay home when possible.”

Under his Proclamation, the Governor directs all hospitals in these counties to postpone surgeries and procedures that are not immediately, medically necessary to correct a serious medical condition or to preserve the life of a patient who without immediate performance of the surgery or procedure would be at risk for serious adverse medical consequences or death, as determined by the patient’s physician. Through proclamation, the Governor can add or subtract from the list of counties included in his original Executive Order and subsequent Proclamations to address surges in hospitalizations that may arise in other parts of the state.

The following counties are included in the Governor’s Proclamation:

All counties within TSA J—Andrews, Brewster, Crane, Ector, Glasscock, Howard, Jeff Davis, Loving, Martin, Midland, Pecos, Presidio, Reeves, Terrell, Upton, Ward, and Winkler counties;

All counties within TSA K—Coke, Concho, Crockett, Irion, Kimble, Mason, McCulloch, Menard, Reagan, Runnels, Schleicher, Sterling, Sutton, and Tom Green counties;

All counties within TSA M—Bosque, Falls, Hill, Limestone, and McLennan counties;

All counties within TSA O that are not already covered by Executive Order GA-27—Bastrop, Blanco, Burnet, Caldwell, Fayette, Hays, Lee, Llano, San Saba, and Williamson counties;

All counties within TSA P that are not already covered by Executive Order GA-27—Atascosa, Bandera, Comal, Dimmit, Edwards, Frio, Gillespie, Gonzales, Guadalupe, Karnes, Kendall, Kerr, Kinney, La Salle, Maverick, Medina, Real, Uvalde, Val Verde, Wilson, and Zavala counties;

All counties within TSA Q that are not already covered by Executive Order GA-27—Austin, Colorado, Fort Bend, Matagorda, Montgomery, Walker, Waller, and Wharton counties;

All counties within TSA R—Brazoria, Chambers, Galveston, Hardin, Jasper, Jefferson, Liberty, Newton, and Orange counties;

All counties within TSA S—Calhoun, DeWitt, Goliad, Jackson, Lavaca, and Victoria counties;

All counties within TSA T that are not already covered by Executive Order GA-27—Jim Hogg and Zapata counties;

All counties within TSA U that are not already covered by Executive Order GA-27—Aransas, Bee, Brooks, Duval, Jim Wells, Kenedy, Kleberg, Live Oak, McMullen, Refugio, and San Patricio counties; and

All counties within TSA V that are not already covered by Executive Order GA-27—Starr and Willacy counties.

Texas is divided into twenty-two regions called trauma service areas (TSAs), provided for the formation of a regional advisory council (RAC) in each region to develop and implement a regional trauma system plan, delineated the trauma facility designation process, and provided for the development of a state trauma registry. For more information about TSAs, visit the Texas Department of State Health Services website.


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 1,201 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

DALLAS — As of 11:00am July 9, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 1,201 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total case count in Dallas County to 30,361, including 436 deaths.

The additional 10 deaths being reported today include:

  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Garland. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Irving. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Sunnyvale. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She expired in an area hospital ED and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 90’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. He expired in the facility and had underlying high-risk health conditions.

An increasing proportion of COVID-19 cases in Dallas County are being diagnosed in young adults between 18 to 39 years of age, such that of all cases reported after June 1st, half have been in this age group.
Increasing reports of cases are continuing to be associated with multiple large recreational and social gatherings since the beginning of June, including house parties. Of the cases requiring hospitalization to date,
more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 increased to 32% among symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals in week 26. The age-adjusted rates of confirmed COVID-19 cases in non-hospitalized patients have been highest among Hispanics (667.4 per 100,000), Asians (187.4 per 100,000), and Blacks (136.4 per 100,000). These rates have been higher than Whites (43.8 per 100,000). Over 60% of overall COVID-19 cases to date have been Hispanic. Of cases requiring hospitalization who reported employment, over 80% have been critical infrastructure workers, with a broad range of affected occupational sectors, including healthcare, transportation, food and agriculture, public works, finance, communications, clergy, first responders, and other essential functions.

Of the 436 total deaths reported to date, about a third have been associated with long-term care facilities. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. We continue to see record-high numbers of COVID-19 inpatients in Dallas County with 831 COVID-19 patients in acute care for the period ending Wednesday, July 8. Additionally, the number of emergency room visits for COVID-19 like symptoms in Dallas County increased to 824 emergency room visits in the 24 hour period ending Wednesday, July 8, which represents over 36 percent of all emergency department visits in Dallas County according to information reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council. These numbers continue to put tremendous strain on our health care facilities and providers. You can find additional information on risk-level monitoring data here.

“Today we announced another 10 deaths to COVID-19 as rampant community spread continues. Things will get worse before they get better and it’s up to all of us to wear our masks whenever around people outside of our own home. Take a mask with you when you go to walk the dog or exercise as you may find yourself around other people unexpectedly. With the amount of spread in the community, you are much more likely to come into contact with people who are infected than you were during the time when we had the Safer at Home (shelter in place) orders. Therefore, limit your activities outside the home to absolute necessities. Please do not eat in restaurants or go to gyms, day camps, arcades, movie theaters, bowling alleys, amusement parks, concert venues, sporting arenas, group youth sports, public pools, weddings or other large events or any other venue where there are high-touch surfaces and masks cannot be worn at all times.

Remember, if a member of your household comes down with COVID-19, the entire household will be forced to isolate at home for a minimum of 14 days and potentially longer. Please see the attached document as to the required isolation. It’s up to all of us to #FlattenTheCurve and, in order to keep as many of us as healthy as possible and keep our economy moving, please wear your mask at all times when around other people outside your home, maintain six-foot distancing, and follow the safety guidelines and color-coded chart found at www.DallasCountyCOVID.org,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.


Dallas County Health and Human Services
2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID‐19) Summary for July 7, 2020

Click images to enlarge.

All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 1,029 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

DALLAS — As of 11:00 am July 8, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 1,029 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total case count in Dallas County to 29,160, including 426 deaths.

The additional 16 deaths being reported today include:

  • A woman in her 20’s who was a resident of the City of Grand Prairie. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 40’s who was a resident of the City of Grand Prairie. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 40’s who was a resident of the City of Farmers Branch. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 50’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. She expired in the facility and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 50’s who was a resident of the City of Grand Prairie. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.  A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Coppell. She expired in area hospital ED and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Grand Prairie. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Grand Prairie. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. He expired in the facility and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 80’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Mesquite. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 80’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.

An increasing proportion of COVID-19 cases in Dallas County are being diagnosed in young adults between 18 to 39 years of age, such that of all cases reported after June 1st, half have been in this age group. Increasing reports of cases are continuing to be associated with multiple large recreational and social gatherings since the beginning of June, including house parties. Of the cases requiring hospitalization to date, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 increased to 32% among symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals in week 26. The age-adjusted rates of confirmed COVID19 cases in non-hospitalized patients have been highest among Hispanics (667.4 per 100,000), Asians (187.4 per 100,000), and Blacks (136.4 per 100,000). These rates have been higher than Whites (43.8 per 100,000). Over 60% of overall COVID-19 cases to date have been Hispanic. Of cases requiring hospitalization who reported employment, over 80% have been critical infrastructure workers, with a broad range of affected occupational sectors, including healthcare, transportation, food and agriculture, public works, finance, communications, clergy, first responders, and other essential functions.

Of the 426 total deaths reported to date, about a third have been associated with long-term care facilities. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. We continue to see record-high numbers of COVID-19 inpatients in Dallas County with 771 COVID-19 patients in acute care for the period ending Tuesday, July 7. Additionally, the number of emergency room visits for COVID-19 like symptoms in Dallas County increased by almost 200 to 786 emergency room visits in the 24 hour period ending Tuesday, July 7, which represents almost 35 percent of all emergency department visits in Dallas County according to information reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council. These numbers continue to put tremendous strain on our health care facilities and providers. You can find additional information on risk-level monitoring data here.

“Today for the sixth day in a row we are over 1,000 new cases of COVID-19 in Dallas County and unfortunately, we’re reporting 16 deaths, including a woman in her 20’s and a man in his 40’s without underlying high-risk health conditions. This is an extremely critical time in our battle against COVID-19. We expect to see more cases in the coming days and how high this surge goes is dependent on each of us doing our part.

In the government, it means following the advice of both the medical experts who are tasked with treating COVID-19 patients in our hospitals and the public health authorities in the counties most affected by the COVID-19 surge. For individuals, whether leaders at home or leaders in the workplace, it means following the best advice: always wearing a mask when outside the home and around other people, and downloading, printing, and using daily the color-coded chart that can be found at www.DallasCountyCOVID.org when making our decisions. That chart includes every activity that is now permitted in Texas and whether or not doctors advise that it be done at this time in North Texas. It includes factoring in for age and underlying conditions and whether you live in a home or are a caretaker for a person with an underlying condition. It is the best resource to answer questions about what you should do and how you should do it. This information is updated regularly and there are new updates that should be out later today or tomorrow. Check the website regularly and please stay safe.

If we all move from selfishness to sacrifice we can get through this together. Our community is doing a great job in wearing a mask and showing grace and kindness to one another. We’ve got to step it up even more to keep our economy moving and keep as many people as healthy as possible,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.


Dallas County Health and Human Services
2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID‐19) Summary for July 7, 2020

Click images to enlarge.

All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 1,077 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

DALLAS — As of 11:00am July 7, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 1,077 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total case count in Dallas County to 28,131, including 410 deaths.

The additional 9 deaths being reported today include:

  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Mesquite. He expired in an area hospital ED and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of DeSoto. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of DeSoto. He had been hospitalized and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of DeSoto. He expired in an area hospital ED and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 90’s who was a resident of the City of Mesquite. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 90’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Mesquite. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.

An increasing proportion of COVID-19 cases in Dallas County are being diagnosed in young adults between 18 to 39 years of age, such that of all cases reported after June 1 st, half have been in this age group. Increasing reports of cases are continuing to be associated with multiple large recreational and social gatherings since the beginning of June, including house parties. Of the cases requiring hospitalization to date, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 increased to 32% among symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals in week 26. The age-adjusted rates of confirmed COVID19 cases in non-hospitalized patients have been highest among Hispanics (667.4 per 100,000), Asians (187.4 per 100,000), and Blacks (136.4 per 100,000). These rates have been higher than Whites (43.8 per 100,000). Over 60% of overall COVID-19 cases to date have been Hispanic. Of cases requiring hospitalization who reported employment, over 80% have been critical infrastructure workers, with a broad range of affected occupational sectors, including healthcare, transportation, food and agriculture, public works, finance, communications, clergy, first responders, and other essential functions.

Of the 410 total deaths reported to date, about a third have been associated with long-term care facilities. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays. Tuesday’s summary is attached.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. We continue to see record-high numbers of COVID-19 inpatients in Dallas County with 756 COVID-19 patients in acute care for the period ending Monday, July 6. This daily total is close to 100 more than our previous daily number of inpatient cases. Additionally, the number of emergency room visits for COVID-19 like symptoms in Dallas County continues to be high with 604 emergency room visits in the 24 hour period ending Monday, July 6, which represents 30 percent of all emergency department visits in Dallas County according to information reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council. These numbers continue to put tremendous strain on our health care facilities and providers. You can find additional information on risk-level monitoring data here.

“Today’s numbers include nine deaths, most of whom did not have underlying high-risk health conditions. We continue to see wide community spread and the need for more targeted actions to keep our community safe. Doctors strongly discourage in-restaurant dining and going to the following businesses: bowling alleys, arcades, amusement parks, concert venues, sporting arenas, movie theatres, gyms (to include yoga and spin studios, etc.), and public pools. Please wear your mask whenever around people outside your family and please take a face covering with you, even when going out to exercise as you may find yourself bumping into other people or unexpectedly around others.

With COVID-19 spreading so rapidly through the community, it’s very important that we avoid stranger contact without being properly masked, so always have one handy when walking or exercising in the neighborhood. It’s up to all of us to #FlattenTheCurve and the best way to do that is to avoid crowds by staying home and staying safe and #WearAMask. We will get through this together Dallas by ensuring that faith in science wins over the fear of the unknown, that prayer replaces panic, and sacrifice for the good of the community replaces our selfish desires. North Texas is a compassionate and resilient place and I’m proud of the response that I am seeing from our community each day. Please stay safe,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.


Dallas County Health and Human Services
2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID‐19) Summary for July 7, 2020

Click images to enlarge.

All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/