NOTICE OF A PUBLIC HEARING BEFORE THE PLANNING AND ZONING COMMISSION AND CITY COUNCIL ZONING FILE #2021-23

A public hearing will be held before the Planning & Zoning Commission on Monday, January 10, 2022, at 7:00 p.m., and before City Council on Tuesday, February 1, 2022, at 7:00 p.m., in the Council Chambers, City Hall, 203 E. Wheatland Rd, Duncanville, Texas, to hear a request of the City of Duncanville for a Planned Development/Downtown Duncanville District, on Odai Block 1 lot 2, more commonly known as 2 N. Duncanville Rd., City of Duncanville, Dallas County, Texas.

As an interested citizen, you may appear at the public hearing or you may send a notice to either the City Secretary or to Skye Thibodeaux, Secretary of the Planning and Zoning Commission, P.O. Box 380280, Duncanville, Texas, 75138-0280 stating your position.

CITY OF DUNCANVILLE

Kristin Downs

City Secretary

Skye Thibodeaux,

City Planner

NOTICE OF A PUBLIC HEARING BEFORE THE PLANNING AND ZONING COMMISSION ZONING FILE #2022-03

A public hearing will be held before the Planning & Zoning Commission on Monday, January 10, 2022, at 7:00 p.m., and before the City Council on Tuesday, February 1, 2022, at 7:00 p.m., in the Council Chambers, City Hall, 203 E. Wheatland Road, Duncanville, Texas, to hear a request of Keith Rhynehart, Applicant and Owner, to include a Specific Use Permit “SUP” for Carport on Green Hills 4th Inst 3rd Sec, Block 7, Lot 26, City of Duncanville, Dallas County, Texas, more commonly known as 1326 Meadow Green.

As an interested citizen, you may appear at the public hearing or you may send a notice to either the City Secretary or to Skye Thibodeaux, Secretary of the Planning and Zoning Commission, P.O. Box 380280, Duncanville, Texas, 75138-0280 stating your position.

CITY OF DUNCANVILLE

Kristin Downs

City Secretary

Skye Thibodeaux, AICP

Secretary, Planning and Zoning Commission

NOTICE OF A PUBLIC HEARING BEFORE THE PLANNING AND ZONING COMMISSION AND CITY COUNCIL ZONING FILE #2022-01

A public hearing will be held before the Planning & Zoning Commission on Monday, January 10, 2022, at 7:00 p.m., and before City Council on Tuesday, February 1, 2022, at 7:00 p.m., in the Council Chambers, City Hall, 203 E. Wheatland Rd, Duncanville, Texas, to hear a request of the City of Duncanville for a Planned Development/Neighborhood Office/Retail District, on AMG Merrill Abstract 884, Page 106, Tr 15, more commonly known as 400 E Center St, City of Duncanville, Dallas County, Texas.

As an interested citizen, you may appear at the public hearing or you may send a notice to either the City Secretary or to Skye Thibodeaux, Secretary of the Planning and Zoning Commission, P.O. Box 380280, Duncanville, Texas, 75138-0280 stating your position.

CITY OF DUNCANVILLE

Kristin Downs

City Secretary

Skye Thibodeaux,

City Planner

Duncanville City Council Unanimously Votes to Approve New Single-Member District Boundaries

Duncanville, TX (December 10, 2021) – On Tuesday, December 7, 2021, the Duncanville City Council unanimously approved a preliminary new map of the City’s five single-member districts for the next ten years. Per the City Charter, a final vote on the proposed map will occur during the December 21, 2021, City Council meeting.

All cities with single-member city council districts must engage in “redistricting” every ten years following a Federal Census to ensure that all voting districts follow all state and federal laws and continue to have roughly equal populations. The City of Duncanville’s five single-member city council districts each represent a separate district within the City. Based on a review of the new 2020 federal census data, which shows the City’s population has grown from 38,751 ten years ago to 40,745 today, Duncanville’s single-member districts have become unbalanced and no longer have sufficiently equal populations. Therefore the City of Duncanville must redistrict.

The City of Duncanville enlisted the law firm of Bickerstaff Heath Delgado Acosta LLP, whose primary focus is on state and local government law. The firm evaluated the redistricting requirements and criteria provided to them by Council and presented four plans for consideration during the December 7, 2021 Regular meeting. The four were Plan A with an impact to 213 voting age persons, Plan B with 597, Plan C with 1,090, and Plan D with 1,337. The Council considered all four maps, heard public comments, and voted unanimously to approve the Draft Plan A map.

The Duncanville City Council Adopted the Plan A draft map due to its lower impact on the City’s population. The 5 Districts, which total 40,745 persons with 30,245 voting age persons (VAP) breaks down as follows:

District 1: 8,175 total persons with 6,252 VAP (27.37% Hispanic, 34.33% White, 33.24% Black, 1.98% Asian and 3.0% Other)


District 2: 8,380 total persons with 6,136 VAP (42.49% Hispanic, 28.03% White, 25.49% Black, 1.08% Asian and 2.92% Other)


District 3: 7,772 total persons with 5,719 VAP (48.44% Hispanic, 22.80% White, 25.23% Black, 1.29% Asian and 2.24% Other)


District 4: 8,510 total persons with 6,472 VAP (32.32% Hispanic, 20.33% White, 42.75% Black, 1.84% Asian and 2.72% Other)


District 5: 7,908 total persons with 5,666 VAP (50.23% Hispanic, 23.23% White, 21.85% Black, 1.73% Asian and 2.95% Other)

The Duncanville City Council meets on the first and third Tuesdays of each month. The next meeting is scheduled for Tuesday, December 21, 2021. Residents can attend the meeting in-person, via Zoom or watch live on Facebook. Events information can be found at Duncanville.com/events.

Adopted Plan A Redistricting Map

A Duncanville Redistricting FAQ

REDISTRICTING FAQ

See the Proposed Maps
(Click image to enlarge/Click buttons below map for Demographic Data)

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Why is redistricting happening?

A: All cities with single-member city council districts must engage in “redistricting” every 10 years following the Federal Census to ensure that all districts continue to have roughly equal populations and follow all state and federal laws. The City of Duncanville’s five single-member city-council districts each represents a separate district within the city. Based on a review of the new 2020 federal census data, these districts are out of balance in that they do not have sufficiently equal populations, and therefore the City of Duncanville must redistrict.

Q: What is the Voting Rights Act?

A: Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act (VRA) prohibits voting practices, policies, or procedures that have a discriminatory purpose or effect on racial or language minorities; this section applies nationwide and is a permanent provision of the VRA. To be in compliance with Section 2 of the VRA, districts must provide voters with an equal opportunity to elect candidates of their choice.

VOTING RIGHTS ACT (VRA)

The Voting Rights Act (VRA) was originally passed in 1965 to prohibit discrimination on the basis of race or color. It has been amended several times, and now also prohibits discrimination based on membership in certain language minority groups.

Q: How can I share my opinion?

A: On December 7, 2021, the City will hold an open public hearing in which the City’s consulting team will present information, and the public will have a chance to ask questions and share their thoughts, which will be documented in the public record and considered before final maps are ultimately adopted. You can view the public meeting schedule and other information related to the redistricting process on the City’s website.

Q: What districts will change?

A: Council will determine the new district lines based on several adopted guidelines (Link of adopted resolution (088 & 089) from city council meeting), public input, and recommendations from a professional consultant. Every district CAN change, but every district is NOT required to change. Some districts may see no change at all.

Q: Can you move the district line over one street? Why do the lines appear uneven?

A: The criteria/guidelines adopted by the Council on November 30th established a set of guiding principles for adding or changing district lines. These guidelines included changing lines based on Census Tracts.  Census Tracts are geographical areas for which the census bureau releases data.  Census tracts are relatively permanent ‘units of analysis’ that are delineated for the purpose of presenting decennial census data.  It was determined by City Council that any Changes to the district’s lines shall closely resemble these census tracts. Per the guidelines, City Council determined that best practice would avoid deviating from breaking up or fracturing these established census tracts.  As such, any changes, additions, or deletions will be based on whole census tracts.

Q: When does this take effect?

A: The new districts will go into effect immediately upon adoption.

Q: Does every city get redistricted?

A: Under the Voting Rights Act, every city with single-member districts is constitutionally mandated to do an assessment following the U.S., which occurs every ten years. Every City where a population increase or decrease creates a significant enough imbalance in its districts must redistrict. The goal is to have each district have as close to the same population as every other district.

Q: Why did my area not get redistricted?

A: All the districts were assessed for population shifts. Redistricting focuses on ensuring that all districts have similar population sizes. The Council must also consider the demographics of its current districts, and how any changes to its current districts will affect the demographics of the new districts. Redistricting every district might create more problems than it would solve.

Q: Who can I talk to about my district?

A: There are several resources on the world wide web addressing Local, State, and National districts.  If your inquiry is about the City of Duncanville, you can reach out to our Public Information Officer or our City Secretary at the emails provided below. You may also call the City directly at 972.780.5000. The City of Duncanville has also provided links and contact information to the State and Federal websites on our City Website.

Q: How Do I vote in the next election?

A: Just like you have every year. Depending on the final plan adopted, your district may or may NOT change. If it does change then you will vote for the candidates running in the district you are in.

Q: Did my Councilmember Change?

A: Only if you are in a district whose boundaries have been changed. Otherwise, you will continue to vote as you have for the last ten years.

Q: What about the School, County, State, and National Elections? How am I Impacted?

A: Each entity or political subdivision is responsible for conducting its own redistricting effort.  Check with your local school district, state representative’s office, or Congressional office for more information. We have provided links below for your convenience.

Q: Will the City redistricting affect where I vote for my council member (Precinct)?

A: No. The new districts currently being proposed do not impact county voting precincts.

Q: What were the redistricting criteria and guidelines adopted by the City Council on November 30, 2021?

  • Each district should contain roughly the same number of people.
  • Easily identifiable geographic boundaries should be followed.
  • Communities of interest should be maintained in a single district, and attempts should be made to avoid splitting neighborhoods.
  • Councilmember districts should be composed of whole voting precincts. Where this is not possible or practicable, districts should be drawn considering county election precincts. Avoid splitting census blocks unless necessary.
  • Although it is recognized that existing districts will have to be altered to reflect new population distribution in the City, any districting plan should be based on existing districts.
  • Districts must be configured so that they are relatively equal in total population according to the 2020 federal census. In no event should the total population deviation between the largest and the smallest district exceed ten percent as compared to the ideal precinct size.
  • The districts should be compact and composed of contiguous territory. Compactness may contain a functional, as well as a geographical, dimension.
  • Consideration may be given to the preservation of incumbent-constituency relations by recognition of the residence of incumbents and their history in representing certain areas.
  • The plan should be narrowly tailored to avoid racial gerrymandering in violation of Shaw v. Reno.
  • Each district should contain roughly the same number of people;
  • Easily identifiable geographic boundaries should be followed.
  • Communities of interest should be maintained in a single district, and attempts should be made to avoid splitting neighborhoods.
  • Councilmember districts should be composed of whole voting precincts. Where this is not possible or practicable, districts should be drawn considering county election precincts. Avoid splitting census blocks unless necessary.
  • Although it is recognized that existing districts will have to be altered to reflect new population distribution in the City, any districting plan should be based on existing districts.
  • Districts must be configured so that they are relatively equal in total population according to the 2020 federal census. In no event should the total population deviation between the largest and the smallest district exceed ten percent as compared to the ideal precinct size.
  • The districts should be compact and composed of contiguous territory. Compactness may contain a functional, as well as a geographical, dimension.
  • Consideration may be given to the preservation of incumbent-constituency relations by recognition of the residence of incumbents and their history in representing certain areas.
  • The plan should be narrowly tailored to avoid racial gerrymandering in violation of Shaw v. Reno.

https://redistricting.capitol.texas.gov/faq

Q: Who is my representative; where can I find information about the legislative district that I live in?

A: In Who Represents Me? enter an address to obtain information on the representative, senator, or member of Congress who represents that address. Additional information about the district is available on that website.

Q: Where can I find a more detailed map of my district?

A: DistrictViewer provides the ability to view maps interactively. The further you zoom in, the more map features you see.

Q: What if I have further questions?

A: If you have further questions you may contact, David Kees, Executive Assistant to the City Manager at 972-780-5007.

Dallas County Reports a Total of 1,472 New Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases and 22 Deaths, Including 334 Probable Cases

As of 12:00 pm December 28, 2021, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 1,472 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) in Dallas County, 1,138 confirmed cases, and 334 probable cases. There is a cumulative total of 364,567 confirmed cases (PCR test). There is a cumulative total of 67,972 probable cases (antigen test). A total of 5,529 Dallas County residents have lost their lives due to COVID-19 illness.

High Risk Transmission Level Red

Dallas County Health and Human Services (DCHHS) provided more than 500,000 total doses of COVID-19 vaccine at the Fair Park mega-vaccine clinic, which operated from January 11 through July 17. A vaccination clinic is open at the Dallas College Eastfield Campus Location on Tuesdays – Saturdays from 9 am-6 pm. A weekly pop-up vaccination clinic will take place at Fair Park on Sundays, from 10 am – 4 pm, starting November 21st, 2021.

The additional deaths being reported today include the following:

  • A woman in her 30’s who was a resident of the City of Grand Prairie. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 40’s who was a resident of the City of Balch Springs. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 40’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 40’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 50’s who was a resident of the City of Mesquite. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 50’s who was a resident of the City of Grand Prairie. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Rowlett. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Desoto. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Lancaster. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. He expired in hospice and did not have underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Garland. He expired in hospice and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Duncanville. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Rowlett. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. He expired in hospice and had underlying high risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. She expired in hospice and had underlying high risk health conditions.

To date, a total of 542 cases with SARS-CoV-2 variants have been identified and investigated in residents of Dallas County, including 148 cases of B.1.1.7 (Alpha); 4 cases of B.1.351 (Beta); 344 cases of B.1.617.2 (Delta); 11 cases of B.1.427 (Epsilon);  19 cases of P.1 (Gamma);  9 cases of B.1.526 (Iota); 4 cases of C.37 (Lambda); 1 case of B.1.621 (Mu); 1 case of B.1.1.529 (Omicron); and 1 case of P.2 (Zeta). One hundred and 10 cases have been hospitalized and 9 have died. Eight COVID-19 variant cases were reinfections. One hundred and twenty-three people were considered fully vaccinated before infection with a COVID-19 variant. As of 12/22/2021, a total of 3,308 confirmed and probable cases were reported in CDC week 50 (week ending 12/18/21), which is a weekly rate of 125.5 new cases per 100,000 residents.

As of the week ending 12/18/2021, about 77% of Dallas County residents age 12 years and older have received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine, including: 96% of residents age 65 years and older; 83% of residents between 40-64 years of age; 73% of residents 25-39 years of age; 62% of residents 18-24 years of age; and 57% of residents 12-17 years of age.  In the cities of Addison, Coppell, Highland Park, Irving, and Sunnyvale, greater than 90% of residents 18 years of age and older have received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine.  In the cities of Desoto, Farmers Branch, Garland and University Park, greater than 80% of residents 18 years of age and older have received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine. (See below).

About 68.0% of COVID-19 cases diagnosed in Week 50 were Dallas County residents who were not fully vaccinated.  In Dallas County, 21,890 cases of COVID-19 breakthrough COVID-19 infections in fully vaccinated individuals have been confirmed to date, of which 779 (3.6%) were hospitalized and 208 have died due to COVID-19. Of all Dallas County residents tested for COVID-19 by PCR during the week ending 12/18/2021 (CDC week 50), 10.8% of respiratory specimens tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. For week 50, area hospital labs have continued to report elevated numbers and proportions of respiratory specimens that are positive for other respiratory viruses by molecular tests: parainfluenza (5.5%), rhinovirus/enterovirus (40.4%) and RSV (5.0%).

There are currently 25 active long-term care facility outbreaks. A cumulative total of 4,935 residents and 2,912 healthcare workers in long-term facilities in Dallas have been diagnosed with COVID-19. Of these, 1,203 have been hospitalized and 851 have died. About 16% of all deaths reported to date have been associated with long-term care facilities.

There have been 6 outbreaks of COVID-19 in a congregate-living facility (e.g. homeless shelters, group homes, and halfway homes) reported within the past 30 days. A cumulative total of 767 residents and 263 staff members in congregate-living facilities in Dallas have been diagnosed with COVID-19.

New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with more detailed data dashboards and summary reports updated on Friday evenings, available at: https://www.dallascounty.org/departments/dchhs/2019-novel-coronavirus/daily-updates.php.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators as part of determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. The most recent COVID-19 hospitalization data for Dallas County, as reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council, can be found at www.dallascounty.org/covid-19 under “Monitoring Data,” and is updated regularly. This data includes information on the total available ICU beds, suspected and confirmed COVID-19 ER visits in the last 24 hours, confirmed COVID-19 inpatients, and COVID-19 deaths by actual date of death. The most recent forecasting from UTSW can be found here.

“Today’s numbers of 1,472 and 22 deaths are a continuous significant increase in positive cases above what we saw only a few short days ago. With the number of deaths being a trailing indicator, the deaths that we are experiencing now are from the Delta surge we are coming out of, not the Omicron surge that is now underway. It’s important that we all do our part. We are working hard to increase testing opportunities throughout Dallas County, opening more sites and providing more tests to current sites. You can find a testing site near you at this link: https://tdem.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=1e91fb79fa44417898738e5bff31a3d8&fbclid=IwAR37bPcsKrH7nUe6e__-0eKHy4Ph-6TzJCBD4akpdBr0zPx8A2ns82irowQ It’s also important if you have been vaccinated and boosted that you do so as soon as possible. You can find your vaccination or booster at many locations near you, by going to vaccines.gov. With another holiday upon us, how well we do tomorrow and through the weekend on limiting crowd size and exposure opportunities will determine how our hospitals are into weeks with the highly contagious Omicron variant. Enjoy your New Year’s, have fun with those that you love, but do so safely and celebrate in small groups,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins. 


All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/ and all guidance documents can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/guidance-health.php
Specific Guidance for the Public:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Avoid close contact outside your home: Put 6 feet of distance between yourself and people who don’t live in your household.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others and continue to keep about 6 feet between yourself and others. The cloth face cover is not a substitute for social distancing.
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands often and with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
    Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces daily using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash. If you do not have a tissue, use your sleeve, not your hands. Immediately wash your hands.
  • Monitor your health daily. Be alert for symptoms. Take your temperature and follow CDC guidance if symptoms develop.

Additional information is available at the following websites:

For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports a Four-Day Total of 5,371 New Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases and 19 Deaths, Including 749 Probable Cases

As of 12:00 pm December 29, 2021, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 5,371 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) in Dallas County, 4,622 confirmed cases, and 749 probable cases. There is a cumulative total of 363,429 confirmed cases (PCR test). There is a cumulative total of 67,638 probable cases (antigen test). A total of 5,507 Dallas County residents have lost their lives due to COVID-19 illness. Today’s press release includes the new case totals accumulated from Friday the 24th through Tuesday the 28th.

High Risk Transmission Level Red

Dallas County Health and Human Services (DCHHS) provided more than 500,000 total doses of COVID-19 vaccine at the Fair Park mega-vaccine clinic, which operated from January 11 through July 17. A vaccination clinic is open at the Dallas College Eastfield Campus Location on Tuesdays – Saturdays from 9 am-6 pm. A weekly pop-up vaccination clinic will take place at Fair Park on Sundays, from 10 am – 4 pm, starting November 21st, 2021.

The additional deaths being reported today include the following:

  • A woman in her 30’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 40’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Mesquite. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 50’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Sachse. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Rowlett. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 50’s who was a resident of the City of Mesquite. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Sachse. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. He expired in hospice and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Mesquite. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Balch Springs. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Mesquite. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She expired in hospice and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 80’s woman who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.

To date, a total of 542 cases with SARS-CoV-2 variants have been identified and investigated in residents of Dallas County, including 148 cases of B.1.1.7 (Alpha); 4 cases of B.1.351 (Beta); 344 cases of B.1.617.2 (Delta); 11 cases of B.1.427 (Epsilon);  19 cases of P.1 (Gamma);  9 cases of B.1.526 (Iota); 4 cases of C.37 (Lambda); 1 case of B.1.621 (Mu); 1 case of B.1.1.529 (Omicron); and 1 case of P.2 (Zeta). One hundred and 10 cases have been hospitalized and 9 have died. Eight COVID-19 variant cases were reinfections. One hundred and twenty-three people were considered fully vaccinated before infection with a COVID-19 variant. As of 12/22/2021, a total of 3,308 confirmed and probable cases were reported in CDC week 50 (week ending 12/18/21), which is a weekly rate of 125.5 new cases per 100,000 residents.

As of the week ending 12/18/2021, about 77% of Dallas County residents age 12 years and older have received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine, including 96% of residents age 65 years and older; 83% of residents between 40-64 years of age; 73% of residents 25-39 years of age; 62% of residents 18-24 years of age; and 57% of residents 12-17 years of age.  In the cities of Addison, Coppell, Highland Park, Irving, and Sunnyvale, greater than 90% of residents 18 years of age and older have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine.  In the cities of Desoto, Farmers Branch, Garland, and University Park, greater than 80% of residents 18 years of age and older have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. (See below)

About 68.0% of COVID-19 cases diagnosed in Week 50 were Dallas County residents who were not fully vaccinated.  In Dallas County, 21,890 cases of COVID-19 breakthrough COVID-19 infections in fully vaccinated individuals have been confirmed to date, of which 779 (3.6%) were hospitalized and 208 have died due to COVID-19.

Of all Dallas County residents tested for COVID-19 by PCR during the week ending 12/18/2021 (CDC week 50), 10.8% of respiratory specimens tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. For week 50, area hospital labs have continued to report elevated numbers and proportions of respiratory specimens that are positive for other respiratory viruses by molecular tests: parainfluenza (5.5%), rhinovirus/enterovirus (40.4%), and RSV (5.0%).

There are currently 25 active long-term care facility outbreaks. A cumulative total of 4,935 residents and 2,912 healthcare workers in long-term facilities in Dallas have been diagnosed with COVID-19. Of these, 1,203 have been hospitalized and 851 have died. About 16% of all deaths reported to date have been associated with long-term care facilities.

There have been 6 outbreaks of COVID-19 in a congregate-living facility (e.g. homeless shelters, group homes, and halfway homes) reported within the past 30 days. A cumulative total of 767 residents and 263 staff members in congregate-living facilities in Dallas have been diagnosed with COVID-19. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with more detailed data dashboards and summary reports updated on Friday evenings, available at: https://www.dallascounty.org/departments/dchhs/2019-novel-coronavirus/daily-updates.php.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators as part of determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. The most recent COVID-19 hospitalization data for Dallas County, as reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council, can be found at www.dallascounty.org/covid-19 under “Monitoring Data,” and is updated regularly. This data includes information on the total available ICU beds, suspected and confirmed COVID-19 ER visits in the last 24 hours, confirmed COVID-19 inpatients, and COVID-19 deaths by actual date of death. The most recent forecasting from UTSW can be found here.

“Today’s numbers or a four day total 5,371 new cases and 19 deaths. It is important with the numbers increasing and Omicron becoming the dominant strain in Dallas County that we all do whatever we can to protect ourselves and one another. The most important thing you can do right now is to get boosted if you’re not already boosted, and to or do you vaccinated, if you’re not already vaccinated. Second is to wear a mask when indoors went around others outside your home, third is to limit your exposure, by working from home or in small groups while always being masked, foregoing outings with large amounts of people, and using services like delivery and take out. If you feel sick and cannot find a test, please stay home and do not go to work or school. We are working tonight and every day to increase testing. To find a test center near you, you can visit: https://tdem.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=1e91fb79fa44417898738e5bff31a3d8&fbclid=IwAR37bPcsKrH7nUe6e__-0eKHy4Ph-6TzJCBD4akpdBr0zPx8A2ns82irowQ,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.


All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/ and all guidance documents can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/guidance-health.php
Specific Guidance for the Public:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Avoid close contact outside your home: Put 6 feet of distance between yourself and people who don’t live in your household.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others and continue to keep about 6 feet between yourself and others. The cloth face cover is not a substitute for social distancing.
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands often and with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
    Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces daily using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash. If you do not have a tissue, use your sleeve, not your hands. Immediately wash your hands.
  • Monitor your health daily. Be alert for symptoms. Take your temperature and follow CDC guidance if symptoms develop.

Additional information is available at the following websites:

For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports a Total of 1,619 New Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases and 19 Deaths, Including 242 Probable Cases

As of 4:00 pm December 28, 2021, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 1,619 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) in Dallas County, 1,377 confirmed cases, and 242 probable cases. There is a cumulative total of 358,807 confirmed cases (PCR test). There is a cumulative total of 66,889 probable cases (antigen test). A total of 5,488 Dallas County residents have lost their lives due to COVID-19 illness. Today’s report includes data received on Thursday, December 23rd. Tomorrow’s reporting will include data from Friday the 24th through Tuesday the 28th.

High Risk Transmission Level Red

Dallas County Health and Human Services (DCHHS) provided more than 500,000 total doses of COVID-19 vaccine at the Fair Park mega-vaccine clinic, which operated from January 11 through July 17. A vaccination clinic is open at the Dallas College Eastfield Campus Location on Tuesdays – Saturdays from 9 am-6 pm; however, the location is closed through January 3rd due to the holidays. A weekly pop-up vaccination clinic takes place at Fair Park on Sundays, from 10 am – 4 pm, and resumes on January 2, 2022.

The additional deaths being reported today include the following:

  • A woman in her 30’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 30’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 40’s who was a resident of the City of Rowlett. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 40’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 40’s who was a resident of the City of Mesquite. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 40’s who was a resident of the City of Balch Springs. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s was a resident of the City of Garland. He was found deceased at home and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of the City of Sachse. He expired in hospice and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 90’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 90’s who was a resident of the City of Mesquite. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.

To date, a total of 542 cases with SARS-CoV-2 variants have been identified and investigated in residents of Dallas County, including 148 cases of B.1.1.7 (Alpha); 4 cases of B.1.351 (Beta); 344 cases of B.1.617.2 (Delta); 11 cases of B.1.427 (Epsilon);  19 cases of P.1 (Gamma);  9 cases of B.1.526 (Iota); 4 cases of C.37 (Lambda); 1 case of B.1.621 (Mu); 1 case of B.1.1.529 (Omicron); and 1 case of P.2 (Zeta). One hundred and 10 cases have been hospitalized and 9 have died. Eight COVID-19 variant cases were reinfections. One hundred and twenty-three people were considered fully vaccinated before infection with a COVID-19 variant.

As of 12/22/2021, a total of 3,308 confirmed and probable cases were reported in CDC week 50 (week ending 12/18/21), which is a weekly rate of 125.5 new cases per 100,000 residents. As of the week ending 12/18/2021, about 77% of Dallas County residents age 12 years and older have received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine, including 96% of residents age 65 years and older; 83% of residents between 40-64 years of age; 73% of residents 25-39 years of age; 62% of residents 18-24 years of age; and 57% of residents 12-17 years of age.  In the cities of Addison, Coppell, Highland Park, Irving, and Sunnyvale, greater than 90% of residents 18 years of age and older have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine.  In the cities of Desoto, Farmers Branch, Garland, and University Park, greater than 80% of residents 18 years of age and older have received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine. (See below)

About 68.0% of COVID-19 cases diagnosed in Week 50 were Dallas County residents who were not fully vaccinated.  In Dallas County, 21,890 cases of COVID-19 breakthrough COVID-19 infections in fully vaccinated individuals have been confirmed to date, of which 779 (3.6%) were hospitalized and 208 have died due to COVID-19. Of all Dallas County residents tested for COVID-19 by PCR during the week ending 12/18/2021 (CDC week 50), 10.8% of respiratory specimens tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. For week 50, area hospital labs have continued to report elevated numbers and proportions of respiratory specimens that are positive for other respiratory viruses by molecular tests: parainfluenza (5.5%), rhinovirus/enterovirus (40.4%) and RSV (5.0%).

There are currently 25 active long-term care facility outbreaks. A cumulative total of 4,935 residents and 2,912 healthcare workers in long-term facilities in Dallas have been diagnosed with COVID-19. Of these, 1,203 have been hospitalized and 851 have died. About 16% of all deaths reported to date have been associated with long-term care facilities. There have been 6 outbreaks of COVID-19 in a congregate-living facility (e.g. homeless shelters, group homes, and halfway homes) reported within the past 30 days. A cumulative total of 767 residents and 263 staff members in congregate-living facilities in Dallas have been diagnosed with COVID-19.

New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with more detailed data dashboards and summary reports updated on Friday evenings, available at: https://www.dallascounty.org/departments/dchhs/2019-novel-coronavirus/daily-updates.php.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators as part of determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. The most recent COVID-19 hospitalization data for Dallas County, as reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council, can be found at www.dallascounty.org/covid-19 under “Monitoring Data,” and is updated regularly. This data includes information on the total available ICU beds, suspected and confirmed COVID-19 ER visits in the last 24 hours, confirmed COVID-19 inpatients, and COVID-19 deaths by actual date of death. The most recent forecasting from UTSW can be found here.

“The numbers for today are doubling the numbers from our last reported day before Christmas of 874 cases on December 23, which was an 82% increase of the day before. COVID is now spreading rapidly again and for this reason, the Public Health Committee recommends a return to the “Red” risk level. The recommendations for safer activities under Red will be updated later this evening and can be found at https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/guidance-health.php.

It is important that we all do all that we can to protect against the spread of the Omicron variant. We now know that two of our three monoclonal antibody treatments are ineffective against the Omicron variant. Prevention through vaccination and modifying behaviors remain our most effective tools against severe disease and hospitalization. Although we still have people in the hospital sick due to the Delta variant, the percentage of cases that are Omicron is increasing steadily. The lack of an available effective antibody treatment against the Omicron variant for hospitalized patients is another reason to get boosted as soon as possible. Although tests are hard to come by presently, and so is the remaining effective monoclonal antibody, shots for boosters or first or second doses are readily available near you. Go to www.vaccines.org to make your appointment.

If you get your booster today, you’ll have full protection from it in two weeks and some protection from it soon after taking it. We are currently in the beginning of the Omicron wave, and it is not too late for you to get boosted, or get vaccinated. If you’re unvaccinated or vaccinated and eligible for your booster, you will have different requirements for quarantining after an exposure.

It’s very important that you wear your mask. Cloth masks, like the ones frequently seen with a message or words on them, or the name of a designer, have proven to be much less effective against COVID. Most cloth masks come with a slit for you to put a filter in, but people rarely use the filter or buy replacements. It’s important that we mask during this time of high spread. A surgical mask, like the kind worn by a doctor in a doctor’s office, or better still an N95 mask, is your best defense against spreading COVID. Make sure your mask is well fitted and sealed at all points around your face.

Since testing capacity is currently strained and some individuals may be asymptomatic and not seek testing, individuals with COVID may be unaware they are even sick and capable of spreading the virus. It’s important that we all wear our mask when in indoor settings outside our own home or in outdoor settings where six-foot distancing on all sides cannot be accomplished. Now is the time to make good, smart decisions about how you wish to run your office, do your shopping, or celebrate the new year.

To the extent possible, remote work would be wise. Employers like to have employees in the office, but with Omicron capable of spreading to fully vaccinated people, it may be the lesser of two evils to work from home, rather than having Omicron shutdown the workplace for an extended period of time. Likewise for shopping, using curbside pickup and delivery is important now. And with our celebrations for New Years, celebrating with our household, rather than with large groups of people even in outdoor settings, is the recommended course. This new surge of Omicron comes at a bad time for all of us, but I’ve seen North Texas rise to the challenge and I’m confident we will do it again. I and my team will be working hard for you, and are humbled with your faith in us. Have a very happy and safe New Year,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.


All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/ and all guidance documents can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/guidance-health.php
Specific Guidance for the Public:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Avoid close contact outside your home: Put 6 feet of distance between yourself and people who don’t live in your household.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others and continue to keep about 6 feet between yourself and others. The cloth face cover is not a substitute for social distancing.
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands often and with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
    Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces daily using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash. If you do not have a tissue, use your sleeve, not your hands. Immediately wash your hands.
  • Monitor your health daily. Be alert for symptoms. Take your temperature and follow CDC guidance if symptoms develop.

Additional information is available at the following websites:

For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports a Total of 479 New Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases and 18 Deaths, Including 113 Probable Cases

DALLAS — As of 12:00 pm December 22, 2021, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 479 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) in Dallas County, 366 confirmed cases, and 113 probable cases. There is a cumulative total of 356,744 confirmed cases (PCR test). There is a cumulative total of 66,459 probable cases (antigen test). A total of 5,452 Dallas County residents have lost their lives due to COVID-19 illness.

C19-risklevel-extremecaution-EN

Dallas County Health and Human Services (DCHHS) provided more than 500,000 total doses of COVID-19 vaccine at the Fair Park mega-vaccine clinic, which operated from January 11 through July 17. A vaccination clinic is open at the Dallas College Eastfield Campus Location on Tuesdays – Saturdays from 9 am-6 pm. A weekly pop-up vaccination clinic will take place at Fair Park on Sundays, from 10 am – 4 pm, starting November 21st, 2021.

The additional deaths being reported today include the following:

  • A woman in her 20’s who was a resident of the City of Cedar Hill. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 40’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He was found deceased at home and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 40’s who was a resident of the City of Mesquite. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 40’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Mesquite. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Grand Prairie. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Desoto. He expired in the facility and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Garland. He expired in the facility and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Seagoville. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She expired at home and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Cedar Hill. He expired in a facility and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 90’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She expired at home and had underlying high-risk health conditions.

To date, a total of 542 cases with SARS-CoV-2 variants have been identified and investigated in residents of Dallas County, including 148 cases of B.1.1.7 (Alpha); 4 cases of B.1.351 (Beta); 344 cases of B.1.617.2 (Delta); 11 cases of B.1.427 (Epsilon);  19 cases of P.1 (Gamma);  9 cases of B.1.526 (Iota); 4 case of C.37 (Lambda); 1 case of B.1.621 (Mu); 1 case of B.1.1.529 (Omicron); and 1 case of P.2 (Zeta). One hundred and 10 cases have been hospitalized and 9 have died. Eight COVID-19 variant cases were reinfections. One hundred and twenty-three people were considered fully vaccinated before infection with a COVID-19 variant. As of 12/22/2021, a total of 3,308 confirmed and probable cases were reported in CDC week 50 (week ending 12/18/21), which is a weekly rate of 125.5 new cases per 100,000 residents.

As of the week ending 12/18/2021, about 77% of Dallas County residents age 12 years and older have received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine, including 96% of residents age 65 years and older; 83% of residents between 40-64 years of age; 73% of residents 25-39 years of age; 62% of residents 18-24 years of age; and 57% of residents 12-17 years of age.  In the cities of Addison, Coppell, Highland Park, Irving, and Sunnyvale, greater than 90% of residents 18 years of age and older have received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine.  In the cities of Desoto, Farmers Branch, Garland and University Park, greater than 80% of residents 18 years of age and older have received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine. (See below).

About 68.0% of COVID-19 cases diagnosed in Week 50 were Dallas County residents who were not fully vaccinated.  In Dallas County, 21,890 cases of COVID-19 breakthrough COVID-19 infections in fully vaccinated individuals have been confirmed to date, of which 779 (3.6%) were hospitalized and 208 have died due to COVID-19.

Of all Dallas County residents tested for COVID-19 by PCR during the week ending 12/18/2021 (CDC week 50), 10.8% of respiratory specimens tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. For week 50, area hospital labs have continued to report elevated numbers and proportions of respiratory specimens that are positive for other respiratory viruses by molecular tests: parainfluenza (5.5%), rhinovirus/enterovirus (40.4%) and RSV (5.0%).

There are currently 25 active long-term care facility outbreaks. A cumulative total of 4,935 residents and 2,912 healthcare workers in long-term facilities in Dallas have been diagnosed with COVID-19. Of these, 1,203 have been hospitalized and 851 have died. About 16% of all deaths reported to date have been associated with long-term care facilities.

There have been 6 outbreaks of COVID-19 in a congregate-living facility (e.g. homeless shelters, group homes, and halfway homes) reported within the past 30 days. A cumulative total of 767 residents and 263 staff members in congregate-living facilities in Dallas have been diagnosed with COVID-19. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with more detailed data dashboards and summary reports updated on Friday evenings, available at: https://www.dallascounty.org/departments/dchhs/2019-novel-coronavirus/daily-updates.php.

 

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators as part of determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. The most recent COVID-19 hospitalization data for Dallas County, as reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council, can be found at www.dallascounty.org/covid-19 under “Monitoring Data,” and is updated regularly. This data includes information on the total available ICU beds, suspected and confirmed COVID-19 ER visits in the last 24 hours, confirmed COVID-19 inpatients, and COVID-19 deaths by actual date of death. The most recent forecasting from UTSW can be found here.

“Today we report an additional 479 new cases of COVID-19 and 18 deaths. One of those deaths was of a young person in their twenties without underlying conditions. We have so many more tools now than we did at this time last year, with vaccines, boosters and today an announced pill cleared by the FDA to help us with treatment of those most seriously affected. We now know the importance of masks more than we did last year. This should allow us to keep our economy and schools open as we fight the Omicron wave. It’s important for our community and our economy to be successful that we all do our part to protect ourselves and others. Get vaccinated if you have not done so and get boosted if you’re already vaccinated. Also, it’s important to wear a mask when indoors outside your home, and this would include when you have people over to your home who are not in your home on a daily basis. To the extent possible, take your celebrations outside this holiday season, or at a minimum, open as many windows and doors as you can to get cross ventilation and have a very Merry Christmas and happy holidays,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.  


All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/ and all guidance documents can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/guidance-health.php
Specific Guidance for the Public:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Avoid close contact outside your home: Put 6 feet of distance between yourself and people who don’t live in your household.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others and continue to keep about 6 feet between yourself and others. The cloth face cover is not a substitute for social distancing.
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands often and with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
    Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces daily using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash. If you do not have a tissue, use your sleeve, not your hands. Immediately wash your hands.
  • Monitor your health daily. Be alert for symptoms. Take your temperature and follow CDC guidance if symptoms develop.

Additional information is available at the following websites:

For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports a Three-Day Total of 1,904 New Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases and 7 Deaths, Including 290 Probable Cases

DALLAS — As of 12:00 pm December 21, 2021, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 1,904 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) in Dallas County, 1,614 confirmed cases and 290 probable cases. There is a cumulative total of 356,378 confirmed cases (PCR test). There is a cumulative total of 66,346 probable cases (antigen test). A total of 5,434 Dallas County residents have lost their lives due to COVID-19 illness. Today’s press release includes the number of new cases from Saturday, Sunday, and Monday.

C19-risklevel-extremecaution-EN

Dallas County Health and Human Services (DCHHS) provided more than 500,000 total doses of COVID-19 vaccine at the Fair Park mega-vaccine clinic, which operated January 11 through July 17. A vaccination clinic is open at the Dallas College Eastfield Campus Location on Tuesdays – Saturdays from 9 am-6 pm. A weekly pop-up vaccination clinic will take place at Fair Park on Sundays, from 10 am – 4 pm, starting November 21st, 2021.

The additional deaths being reported today include the following:

  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Mesquite. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Mesquite. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He expired in hospice and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Mesquite. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Richardson. She expired in hospice and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 80’s who was a resident of the City of Richardson. She expired in hospice and had underlying high-risk health conditions.

To date, a total of 542 cases with SARS-CoV-2 variants have been identified and investigated in residents of Dallas County, including 148 cases of B.1.1.7 (Alpha); 4 cases of B.1.351 (Beta); 344 cases of B.1.617.2 (Delta); 11 cases of B.1.427 (Epsilon);  19 cases of P.1 (Gamma);  9 cases of B.1.526 (Iota); 4 cases of C.37 (Lambda); 1 case of B.1.621 (Mu); 1 case of B.1.1.529 (Omicron); and 1 case of P.2 (Zeta). One hundred and 10 cases have been hospitalized and 9 have died. Eight COVID-19 variant cases were reinfections. One hundred and twenty-three people were considered fully vaccinated before infection with a COVID-19 variant. As of 12/17/2021, a total of 2,118 confirmed and probable cases were reported in CDC week 49 (week ending 12/11/21), which is a weekly rate of 100.9 new cases per 100,000 residents.

As of the week ending 12/11/2021, about 76% of Dallas County residents age 12 years and older have received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine, including: 95% of residents age 65 years and older; 82% of residents between 40-64 years of age; 73% of residents 25-39 years of age; 62% of residents 18-24 years of age; and 57% of residents 12-17 years of age.  In the cities of Addison, Coppell, Highland Park, Irving, and Sunnyvale, greater than 90% of residents 18 years of age and older have received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine.  In the cities of Desoto, Farmers Branch, Garland and University Park, greater than 80% of residents 18 years of age and older have received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine. (See below).

About 73.6% of COVID-19 cases diagnosed in Week 49 were Dallas County residents who were not fully vaccinated.  In Dallas County, 21,212 cases of COVID-19 breakthrough COVID-19 infections in fully vaccinated individuals have been confirmed to date, of which 769 (3.6%) were hospitalized and 198 have died due to COVID-19. Of all Dallas County residents tested for COVID-19 by PCR during the week ending 12/11/2021 (CDC week 49), 7.2% of respiratory specimens tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. For week 49, area hospital labs have continued to report elevated numbers and proportions of respiratory specimens that are positive for other respiratory viruses by molecular tests: parainfluenza (5.7%), rhinovirus/enterovirus (25.5%) and RSV (6.5%).

There are currently 21 active long-term care facility outbreaks. A cumulative total of 4,880 residents and 2,896 healthcare workers in long-term facilities in Dallas have been diagnosed with COVID-19. Of these, 1,200 have been hospitalized and 850 have died. About 16% of all deaths reported to date have been associated with long-term care facilities. There have been 4 outbreaks of COVID-19 in a congregate-living facility (e.g. homeless shelters, group homes, and halfway homes) reported within the past 30 days. A cumulative total of 756 residents and 259 staff members in congregate-living facilities in Dallas have been diagnosed with COVID-19.

New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with more detailed data dashboards and summary reports updated on Friday evenings, available at: https://www.dallascounty.org/departments/dchhs/2019-novel-coronavirus/daily-updates.php.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators as part of determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. The most recent COVID-19 hospitalization data for Dallas County, as reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council, can be found at www.dallascounty.org/covid-19 under “Monitoring Data,” and is updated regularly. This data includes information on the total available ICU beds, suspected and confirmed COVID-19 ER visits in the last 24 hours, confirmed COVID-19 inpatients, and COVID-19 deaths by actual date of death. The most recent forecasting from UTSW can be found here.

“While you are considered fully-vaccinated with two doses of an MRNA vaccine or a single dose of the J&J vaccine, according to the CDC and other medical experts, significant additional protection is provided by receiving a booster dose when eligible. If it’s been more than 6 months since your second dose of an MRNA vaccine or more than 2 months of a J&J vaccine, please get your booster shot as soon as possible. Boosted individuals have been found to have a much stronger immune response when faced with the Delta and Omicron variants. Our population in Dallas County is only 54.3% fully vaccinated, with even less at 12.5% of the population boosted; a large portion of our population is eligible for a booster right now. Please get boosted as soon as you become eligible so that we can minimize the impact of COVID-19 on our hospitals and in our community as a whole,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins. 


All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/ and all guidance documents can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/guidance-health.php
Specific Guidance for the Public:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Avoid close contact outside your home: Put 6 feet of distance between yourself and people who don’t live in your household.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others and continue to keep about 6 feet between yourself and others. The cloth face cover is not a substitute for social distancing.
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands often and with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
    Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces daily using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash. If you do not have a tissue, use your sleeve, not your hands. Immediately wash your hands.
  • Monitor your health daily. Be alert for symptoms. Take your temperature and follow CDC guidance if symptoms develop.

Additional information is available at the following websites:

For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/