Mosquito Spraying Scheduled for September 2 and 3, 2021

no mosquitoesThe City of Duncanville, at the recommendation and in cooperation with Dallas County Health and Human Services (DCHHS),

will be conducting ground spraying against mosquitoes on Thursday, September 2 and Friday, September 3, between the hours of 9:00 PM and 5:00 AM, weather permitting. The spraying is being conducted in response to the detection of West Nile Virus in one mosquito trap within the 75116 zip code. If the weather prohibits spraying on Thursday night, spraying will be conducted on Friday and Saturday nights. Spraying will be performed in targeted areas within the City of Duncanville (see the attached map). Residents living within the spray zone are encouraged to remain indoors and bring their pets inside during spraying.

The Duncanville spray area will be East of Clark Road, South of Camp Wisdom Road and West of Main Street, North of W. Wheatland Road to North of Cockrell Hill Road.

Residents living within the spray zone are encouraged to remain indoors and bring their pets inside during spraying.

City staff will continue to monitor areas where mosquito breeding is most likely to occur. To prevent the spread of mosquitoes, residents should remove all areas of standing water. Residents should also report all pools that are not well maintained and abandoned homes where mosquitoes are likely to breed to either City of Duncanville Health Services or Neighborhood Services by calling 972-780-5040. Everyone should continue to protect themselves against the West Nile Virus by using insect repellent containing DEET. Citizens are also encouraged to remain indoors during dawn and dusk when mosquitoes are most active.

For more information on the scheduled ground mosquito spraying in Duncanville, contact Tammy Island at 972-780-4963.

Mosquito Pesticide FAQs

What pesticide is used for mosquito control?

Dallas County uses permethrin a synthetic pyrethroid commonly used in mosquito control programs due to its effectiveness. Permethrin has been registered by the EPA since 1979.

Can I opt-out of mosquito spraying?

Yes. Duncanville residents wanting to be on the no-spray list can email Tammy Island at tisland@duncanville.com at or Angelica Garcia at agarcia@duncanville.com to have your address added

Adventures in Gardening

We inherited a mess of a yard with a few easy plants when we moved a few years ago. The biggest problem has been invasive vines that grow all over the place, and have even left scars on the house. At one point, my husband and I dug up two sections of the yard and have been super aggressive in our fight against this green creeping foe.

Another problem is that three trees have died, two from a pest and one from lightning strikes. We also cut down two other trees because of their proximity to the house. Pictured to the left is the stump of one which started growing mushrooms. We’ve removed all of it except just a bit of stump that a grinder will have to rip out.

 

 The good plants that came with the yard are a gorgeous red canna and some yellow iris. These are among my favorite plants because they are so easy to care for. We also have some elephant ears that I was thrilled to get because I’ve admired the big beautiful leaves for so long. Alas, this plant didn’t do so well this year because of the vines, as well as a drainage problem that will be fixed this fall. I also have a ton of monkey grass that I love to have as a border plant.  I’ve added some purple heart, which are easy to grow according to Texas Home Landscaping by Greg Grant and Roger Holmes . I’m looking forward to them spreading out. The previous owners also left behind lots of big rocks; I’m not too sure where to place those so that they look good.

I’ve recently been spending a lot of time researching the best trees and plants to grow in this part of Texas. I have a lot of space in front of the house to fill with good plants. So far, the weeds have taken over. My goal is to spend every spare moment that I can this fall clearing out the bad stuff and planting what I can so that I can enjoy a gorgeous garden all next year.

As always the best place to find info for any subject is at the library! I checked out some gardening and landscaping books and learned that fall is the best time to plant a tree in the book The Horticulture Gardener’s Guides: Design and Planting by Andrew McIndoe. I decided on a Chinese pistache for the main attraction. In this picture you can see that my neighbor across the way also has this tree. His tree is gorgeous, and I can’t wait till our puny little guy grows to be that big! We also planted three white natchez crepe myrtles on one side of the yard and a Japanese maple on the other side.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other books that I have recently explored in my landscaping adventure include The Big Book of Garden Designs by Marianne Lipanovich, Landscape Planning by Judith Adam, Grounds for Improvement by Dean Hill. These are just a few out of a big section we have at the library on gardening and landscaping.

Most of my budget has gone into replacing trees. I would love to put in a path like this:

This is a picture from the book Walks, Patios & Walls. Instead the path I’m excavating will be filled with mulch. My head is full of visions that are full of colorful plantings in perfectly laid out beds with beautiful stone or brick pathways. I see full healthy trees with flowers encircling their bases. I have ideas of outdoor furniture I would like to build myself. I would also love to build a trellis and have something growing all over it. Something that I can manage that won’t invade the yard. Unlike what has been growing wild up until now. I found several ideas for these kinds of projects in 100 Weekend Projects Anyone Can Do.

There is a bit of a problem with all the grand plans in my head. I don’t have a big budget to put towards all of the plants that I need/want. I was lucky to be gifted the purple heart from another avid gardener. I also share what I can from my garden like giving some of my iris to a neighbor and elephant ear to some of my colleagues. I hope to find other gardeners that I can trade plants with!

In the spring I will do a follow up article that will hopefully picture a full garden with that mulch path! What gardening projects are you tackling? Do you have any gardening tips or tricks to share with our audience?

As always, catch us on social media or comment below. If you have a library question, call 972-780-5052 or email librarians@duncanville.com.

Dallas County Reports Three-Day Total of 3,872 New Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases and 10 Deaths, Including 586 Probable Cases

As of 3:00 pm August 31, 2021, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 3,872 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) in Dallas County, 3,286 confirmed cases, and 586 probable cases. There is a cumulative total of 301,575 confirmed cases (PCR test). There is a cumulative total of 51,165 probable cases (antigen test). A total of 4,332 Dallas County residents have lost their lives due to COVID-19 illness. Today’s press release includes the number of new cases from Saturday, Sunday, and Monday.

High Risk Transmission Level Red
High Risk Transmission Level Red

Dallas County Health and Human Services (DCHHS) provided more than 500,000 total doses of COVID-19 vaccine at the Fair Park mega-vaccine clinic, which operated January 11 through July 17. A pop-up vaccination clinic at Fair Park will take place on Saturdays through September 18, from 8 am – 2 pm in Lot 13 for Pfizer first and second doses.

The additional deaths being reported today include the following:

  • A man in his 20’s who was a resident of the City of Irving. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 30’s who was a resident of the City of Lancaster. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 40’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Cedar Hill. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Rowlett. He expired in hospice and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.

To date, a total of 205 cases with SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern have been identified in residents of Dallas County, including 146 cases of B.1.1.7 (Alpha) variants; three B.1.351 (Beta) variants; thirty-six B.1.617.2 (Delta) variants; and twenty P.1 (Gamma) variants. Twenty-three have been hospitalized and four have died. One fully vaccinated patient subsequently became ill from B.1.1.7 infection and died. The provisional seven-day average of daily new confirmed and probable cases (by date of test collection) for CDC week 33 (week ending 8/21/21) was 1,172, which is a rate of 44.5 daily new cases per 100,000 residents.

As of the week ending 8/21/2021, about 66% of Dallas County residents age 12 years and older have received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine, including 87% of residents age 65 years and older; 72% of residents between 40-64 years of age; 61% of residents 25-39 years of age; 50% of residents 18-24 years of age; and 45% of residents 12-17 years of age. In the cities of Coppell and Sunnyvale, greater than 90% of residents 18 years of age and older have received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine. In the cities of Addison and Highland Park, greater than 80% of residents 18 years of age and older have received at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine. (See below). About 86% of COVID-19 cases diagnosed in Week 33 were Dallas County residents who were not fully vaccinated. In Dallas County, 6,544 cases of COVID-19 breakthrough COVID-19 infections in fully vaccinated individuals have been confirmed to date, of which 204 (3.1%) were hospitalized and 29 have died due to COVID-19.

Of all Dallas County residents tested for COVID-19 by PCR during the week ending 8/21/2021 (CDC week 33), 15.8% of respiratory specimens tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. For week 33, area hospital labs have continued to report elevated numbers and proportions of respiratory specimens that are positive for other respiratory viruses by molecular tests: parainfluenza (4.6%), rhinovirus/enterovirus (25%), and RSV (21%). There are currently 62 active long-term care facility outbreaks. A cumulative total of 4,469 residents and 2,574 healthcare workers in long-term facilities in Dallas have been diagnosed with COVID-19. Of these, 1,138 have been hospitalized and 824 have died. About 19% of all deaths reported to date have been associated with long-term care facilities.

There have been nineteen outbreaks of COVID-19 in a congregate-living facility (e.g. homeless shelters, group homes, and halfway homes) reported within the past 30 days. A cumulative total of 684 residents and 232 staff members in congregate-living facilities in Dallas have been diagnosed with COVID-19. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with more detailed data dashboards and summary reports updated on Friday evenings, available at: https://www.dallascounty.org/departments/dchhs/2019-novel-coronavirus/daily-updates.php.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators as part of determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. The most recent COVID-19 hospitalization data for Dallas County, as reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council, can be found at www.dallascounty.org/covid-19 under “Monitoring Data,” and is updated regularly. This data includes information on the total available ICU beds, suspected and confirmed COVID-19 ER visits in the last 24 hours, confirmed COVID-19 inpatients, and COVID-19 deaths by actual date of death. The most recent forecasting from UTSW can be found here.

“Today we report a three-day total of 3,872 cases and 10 deaths. These numbers include the new cases from Saturday, Sunday, and Monday. The most recent projection from UT Southwestern shows that thanks in part to
an increase in masking in Dallas County, recent new hospital admissions have remained relatively flat. Given then increased transmissibility of the Delta variant, the use of COVID-19 prevention strategies are much more important now, including vaccination, masking, physical distance, and testing. If we each do our part for the good of our communities, together we can beat COVID,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.


All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/ and all guidance documents can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/guidance-health.php
Specific Guidance for the Public:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Avoid close contact outside your home: Put 6 feet of distance between yourself and people who don’t live in your household.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others and continue to keep about 6 feet between yourself and others. The cloth face cover is not a substitute for social distancing.
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands often and with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
    Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces daily using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash. If you do not have a tissue, use your sleeve, not your hands. Immediately wash your hands.
  • Monitor your health daily. Be alert for symptoms. Take your temperature and follow CDC guidance if symptoms develop.

Additional information is available at the following websites:

For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/