Mosquito Spraying Scheduled For September 3 and 4

The City of Duncanville, at the recommendation and in cooperation with Dallas County Health and Human Services (DCHHS), will be conducting ground spraying against mosquitoes on Thursday, September 3 and Friday, September 4, between the hours of 9:00 PM and 5:00 AM, weather permitting. The spraying is being conducted in response to the detection of West Nile Virus in one mosquito trap located in the 75116 zip code. If the weather prohibits spraying on Thursday night, spraying will be conducted on Friday and Saturday nights. Spraying will be performed in a targeted area within the City of Duncanville (see the attached map).

City staff will continue to monitor areas where mosquito breeding is most likely to occur. To prevent the spread of mosquitoes, residents should remove all areas of standing water. Residents should also report all pools that are not well maintained and abandoned homes where mosquitoes are likely to breed to either City of Duncanville Health Services or Code Enforcement. Everyone should continue to protect themselves against the West Nile Virus by using insect repellent containing DEET. Citizens are also encouraged to remain indoors during dawn and dusk when mosquitoes are most active.

For more information on the scheduled ground mosquito spraying in Duncanville, contact Tammy Island at 972-707-4963.


FAQs

What pesticide is used for mosquito control?

Dallas County uses permethrin a synthetic pyrethroid commonly used in mosquito control programs due to its effectiveness. Permethrin has been registered by the EPA since 1979.

Can I opt-out of mosquito spraying?

Yes. Duncanville residents wanting to be on the no-spray list can email Tammy Island at tisland@duncanville.com at or Angelica Garcia at agarcia@duncanville.com to have your address added.

Creepy-crawlies

Wicked Fun

Here we are in the middle of another Texas summer. Blistering heat and bugs flying about. In my yard I have many cicadas buzzing their summer song. I remember as a kid I would collect the skins and terrorize my slightly younger cousins with them. I would line the skins up and play whatever game with the husks that popped in my head. I’ve been trying to get my 9-year-old kid to pick them up and have his own adventures with cicada skins, but alas, he is creeped out by the brown husks. I recently found one hanging out on the mailbox. I brought it in with the day’s mail and watched my son cringe at me as usual. So, I went and put it on my husband’s shoulder. How hilarious it was to see him jump. The funny thing was that he saw me with the thing but was still startled when I placed it on his shoulder while he was watching TV.

And those who kill the fun…

Lately I’ve noticed these guys flying about.

Their coloring and size make you want to duck and run because they look like a wasp that means to hurt you, but apparently, they live to hunt cicadas for their young. I wanted to learn more about cicadas and their killers, so naturally I went to the library shelves for more information.

Books are the best for info

In Backyard Bugs by Jaret C. Daniels, I learned that the female cicada killer will deliver a powerful sting if provoked. They are the ones who hunt down cicadas, sting them, and bury them with the eggs they lay so that their young can feed on the cicada carcasses.

In The Songs of Insects by Lang Elliot and Wil Hershberger, I learned that the songs cicadas make are produced by special organs called “tymbals.” I also learned that the cicada eggs are laid in the bark of a tree, and the nymphs that hatch from the eggs fall to the ground and burrow to eat roots. The skins that are found all over the place are the last skin that they shed after they emerge from the ground.

Personally, I’d rather have the cicadas around and will try to eliminate their killers from my garden.

Come on by and check out our books on insects to learn more about the creepy crawlies and flying nuisances that are around your place.


As always, catch us on social media or comment below. If you have a library question, call 972-780-5052 or email librarians@duncanville.com.

Dallas County Reports 455 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

The City of Duncanville is within Dallas County and Dallas County Health and Human Services is the lead agency in charge of gathering and reporting this information.


As of 3:00 PM September 1, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 622 additional confirmed cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total confirmed case count in Dallas County to 72,252, including 920 confirmed deaths. An additional 70 probable cases have been reported, bringing the total number of probable cases in Dallas County to 3,016, including 9 probable deaths from COVID19. Of the 622 new cases we are reporting today, 461 came through the Texas Department of State Health Services’ (DSHS) electronic laboratory reporting (ELR) system and 167 were from months prior to August. Please see a provisional breakdown below of these newly reported cases by date of collection:

Month# of positive patients
February 1* possible lab error in data entry
May101
June14
July51
August294

The additional 19 deaths being reported today include the following:

  • A man in his 40’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He was found deceased at home and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He was found deceased at home and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Mesquite. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He was found deceased at home and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She expired in hospice care.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Garland. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. He expired in the facility.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 90’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. She expired in the facility and had underlying high-risk health conditions.

From August 8th through 21st, 393 school-aged children between 5 to 18 years of age were diagnosed with COVID-19 in Dallas County. About 50% of these cases were high school age. By zip code of residence, 203 (51%) of these children were projected to have been enrolled in Dallas ISD schools.

Of all confirmed cases requiring hospitalization to date, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19. The provisional 7-day average daily new confirmed and probable cases (by date of test collection) for CDC week 34 was 226. The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 continues to decline but remains high, with 11.3% of symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals testing positive in week 34.

Of the total confirmed deaths reported to date, about 25% have been associated with long-term care facilities. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays. Friday’s report is attached.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. There were 380 COVID-19 patients in acute care in Dallas County for the period ending on Monday, August 31. The number of emergency room visits for COVID-19 like symptoms in Dallas County was 337 in the 24 hour period ending on Monday, August 31, which represents around 17 percent of all emergency department visits in the county according to information reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council. While these numbers represent a significant decline from record highs in July, the disruptive impact of COVID-19 on our populations and health care systems remains. You can find additional information on risk-level monitoring data HERE.

Additionally, Figure 1 and Table 11 below are from the September 1, 2020 Dallas County Health and Human Services 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Summary (attached). Figure 1 shows the confirmed COVID-19 positive cases by date of test collection. This chart includes all delayed results that were received by DCHHS as of 8:00pm Monday. Table 11 is a summary of confirmed and probable cases and deaths over the past five weeks and shows a decline in the daily average of new cases in Dallas County.

“Today we are experiencing our highest number of new COVID-19 positive cases that we’ve seen in some time. I caution the public not to overreact to this one day number. It includes many cases from the State’s electronic
laboratory reporting system for this month and those cases may have been botched from several days, making today a higher number. We can look at these numbers over the new few days to see if there’s any sort of a trend
upward. In the meantime, it’s very important that everyone continue to wear their mask, maintain six-foot distance, use good hand-washing, avoid unnecessary trips, and avoid any indoor activities where people are not wearing masks one hundred percent of the time. If we all make good decisions, we’ll continue to see less sickness, more businesses open and our kids back to school sooner rather than later,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.



All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found HERE and all guidance documents can be found HERE.

UPDATED – Dallas County Health and Human Services Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Summary – August 28, 2020

Specific Guidance for the Public:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Avoid close contact outside your home: Put 6 feet of distance between yourself and people who don’t live in your household.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others and continue to keep about 6 feet between yourself and others. The cloth face cover is not a substitute for social distancing.
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands often and with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-base hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces daily using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash. If you do not have a tissue, use your sleeve, not your hands. Immediately wash your hands.
  • Monitor your health daily. Be alert for symptoms. Take your temperature and follow CDC guidance if symptoms develop.

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/