DCHHS announces second re-opening of Emergency Housing Assistance Program for Dallas County Residents

DALLAS (August 27, 2020) – Dallas County Health and Human Services (DCHHS) announces the second re-opening of the Emergency Housing Assistance Program (EHAP) for residents of Dallas County. This program provides short-term, rental, mortgage and utility assistance to Dallas County residents living outside the City of Dallas facing economic hardship in the wake of COVID-19. Assistance for EHAP is eligibility based and will be processed through a lottery system.

DCHHS will begin accepting pre-screening applications online at https://www.dallascounty.org/ehap starting Thursday, August 27, 2020, at 10:00 a.m. (CT). The pre-screening application process will remain open until such time that a closure is announced. The eligible pre-applications will be batched every other week (2nd and 4th Wednesdays at 4:00 p.m.) and processed through the ongoing lottery system to determine SLN order.

The pre-screening application form is available both, in English and Spanish. If you are an individual who does not have access to the internet or is unable to access the pre-screening application online, please call 214-819-1968. Pre-screening applications accepted by phone will be conducted Monday – Thursday from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. (CT). Please note that the submission of a pre-screening application does not guarantee eligibility or an offer of assistance. Only completed applications meeting eligibility requirements, and supported by required documentation, will be considered for assistance based on the availability of funds. Applicants must be 18 years of age or older to apply.

“Given that we are encouraging families to continue to stay home as much as possible right now, keeping people in their homes is especially critical,” said DCHHS Director, Dr. Philip Huang. “As we continue to fight this virus, EHAP will help thousands of Dallas County families in need.” For more information, please visit:

https://www.dallascounty.org/departments/dchhs/ehap-cares.php or https://www.dallascounty.org/covid19/emergency-assistance.php

Homeschooling, distance learning, and COVID-19

When my daughter’s school went to online learning, I felt the irony in my bones. As a child, I was homeschooled and assumed I would homeschool my own children. That had not happened, for various reasons, and my daughter thrived in first a public, then a charter school. And now… now she was learning at home.

It quickly became clear to me that homeschooling and distance learning were not the same, though many people used the term homeschooling for both. In distance learning, the school was still running the show, and in our situation the lessons seemed to rely heavily on online learning and worksheets. In homeschooling, the parent is in charge, and the curricula vary widely and wildly. I watched as the families of the United States learned the paradox of home versus classroom settings; with one or two students and none of the structure and social interactions of in-person school, the time required to finish assigned work shrinks. Through the still magical internet, I learned about the experiences of parents all over the US as their schools tried to adjust to the new situation, with varying degrees of success.

Summer passed by as normally as it could for the kiddos, while the adults goggled at the enormity of the local COVID-19 case numbers and the schools grappled with what to do in the fall. More and more parents with means, faced with the prospect of an indefinite length of distance learning, turned their eyes toward the possibility of homeschooling. Everyone faced what seemed like impossible decisions.

Staying in school

For those who stay in school, resources are available to help them navigate the system. You, Your Child, and School: Navigate Your Way to the Best Education by Sir Ken Robinson and Lou Aronica (2018) gives an overview of educational options and suggestions as to how to decide what is best and what steps to take going forward. Education a la Carte: Choosing the Best Schooling Options For Your Child by Kevin Leman (2017)and Rethinking School: How to Take Charge of Your Child’s Education by Susan Wise Bauer (2019) also discusses educational options and strategies to make things work best for your family, in whatever situation you find yourselves.

For those now tasked with distance learning, books like How to Tutor Your Own Child by Marina Koestler Ruben (2011) and Help Your Kids With Study Skills: A Unique Step-By-Step Visual Guide by Carol Vorderman (2016) may be helpful for parents helping their children at home. While written for college students, Cal Newport’s How to Become a Straight-A Student: The Unconventional Strategies Real College Students Use to Score High While Studying Less (2007) may be helpful for high school students as well. And of course, A Teen’s Guide to Getting Stuff Done by Jennifer Shannon (2017) may help high school students keep themselves on task.

While the local school districts are sailing new waters as they cope with the switch to distance learning, some public schools have existed as distance learning only options for several years. The Texas Education Agency lists public schools that are part of the Texas Virtual School Network at https://txvsn.org/OLS-Campuses.

The world of homeschooling 

With as many reasons for homeschooling as there are families who homeschool, there is no universal homeschool experience. My own homeschooling experience was fairly isolated, as my parents were conservative Christians who didn’t have money for things like homeschool co-ops. I spent much of my free time reading and…well, I became a history major and then a librarian! Others talk of spending lots of time in groups at co-ops or in sports leagues. In some states (though not Texas), homeschoolers can even participate in some public school classes.

Sometimes homeschooling is used by families to maintain a separation from the world that can even be unhealthy. I found echoes of my own experience in Devoted by Jennifer Mathieu (2015), which provides a glimpse into the world of a conservative Christian family through a daughter limited by its assigned gender roles. New York Times bestseller Educated (2018) is Tara Westover’s memoir of life in an abusive family which used “home schooling” in order to maintain their religiously-prompted isolation.

Of course, many people had a positive homeschooling experience, including Paula Penn-Nabrit, the author of Morning by Morning: How We Home-Schooled Our African American Sons to the Ivy League (2003).Rachel Gathercole discusses the social benefits of homeschooling in The Well-Adjusted Child (2007). Quinn Cummings shares her experience of exploring homeschooling in The Year of Learning Dangerously: Adventures in Homeschooling (2012). My own home education provided an excellent basic foundation for learning in high school and college.

Finding resources at the library

The library has many books on homeschooling—or home schooling, as it is spelled in the subject heading used in the records. Most of these books are found at 371.042.

Opposing Viewpoints is a series of books that gives both sides of a debate.

Some works focus on making the decision for whether or not to homeschool, including The Homeschooling Option by Lisa Rivera (2008). The Opposing Viewpoints volume Homeschooling (2010), edited by Noah Berlatsky, contains a variety of essays on many aspects of homeschooling’s pros and cons, including those unique to a Christian setting.

For those who decide to homeschool, many resources exist. Lorilee Lippincott’s The Homeschooling Handbook: How to Make Homeschooling Simple, Affordable, Fun, and Effective (2014) aims to make getting started easier. For those with younger children, The Brave Learner: Finding Everyday Magic in Homeschool, Learning, and Life, by Julie Bogart (2019), focuses on how to create an environment conducive to curiosity and wonder. For those with ambition and a love of the classics, The Well-Trained Mind by Susan Wise Bauer (2016) may be a source of inspiration. Using the classical (as in Greeks and Romans) framework of three learning stages, it gives a wealth of information and recommendations for education from pre-K through grade 12. And of course, a Google search will bring up a wealth of information and curriculum options. It is worth noting here that many homeschool curricula still have an evangelical Christian slant, especially in science.

No matter what decision parents make or are forced into in regard to education, we all agree that we want the best for our children. In these stressful times, hopefully that commonality will bring us together instead of apart.



As always, catch us on social media or comment below. If you have a library question, call 972-780-5052 or email librarians@duncanville.com.

Introducing Library Granola

Granola (that crunchy-munchy goodness) is made up of a lot of different ingredients.

This blog will be like granola; posts may vary in style and they’ll definitely vary in content.

Some posts might be straight-up book reviews. Others might be commentary on daily happenings. Still others will let you in on a few of the library’s secrets.

All of them will offer recommendations of items from our catalog. There will be links to take you to our catalog so you can sign in and place holds on the items you find most fascinating.

We hope our posts will entertain, inform, and inspire you. Leave us comments to let us know what you think and to share your ideas. You can also catch us on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter. Please keep your comments friendly and courteous. We reserve the right to delete any inappropriate comments.

If you have a library question, call 972-780-5052 or email librarians@duncanville.com.


Dallas County Reports 292 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

The City of Duncanville is within Dallas County and Dallas County Health and Human Services is the lead agency in charge of gathering and reporting this information.


As of 1:00 PM August 31, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 460 additional confirmed cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total confirmed case count in Dallas County to 71,630, including 902 confirmed deaths. The total number of probable cases in Dallas County is 2,946, including 8 probable deaths from COVID-19. Of the 460 new cases we are reporting today, 235 came through the Texas Department of State Health Services’ (DSHS) electronic laboratory reporting (ELR) system, and 168 were from previous months, with most from the months of June and July. Please see a provisional breakdown below of these newly reported cases by date of collection:

Month# of positive patients
June9
July159
August67

The additional death being reported today is of a man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He was found deceased at home and had underlying high-risk health conditions.

From August 8th through 21st, 393 school-aged children between 5 to 18 years of age were diagnosed with COVID-19 in Dallas County. About 50% of these cases were high school age. By zip code of residence, 203 (51%) of these children were projected to have been enrolled in Dallas ISD schools.

Of all confirmed cases requiring hospitalization to date, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19. The provisional 7-day average daily new confirmed and probable cases (by date of test collection) for CDC week 34 was 206.

The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 continues to decline but remains high, with 11.0% of symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals testing positive in week 34. Of the total confirmed deaths reported to date, about 26% have been associated with long-term care facilities. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. Due to weekend reporting, new data will be available on Tuesday, September 1, 2020.

“Today we report 292 new cases of COVID-19 in Dallas County. While the total number of cases being reported today is 460, 168 of those are old cases from June and July from the State’s backlogged electronic laboratory reporting system. We continue to see our average number of daily cases decrease and tomorrow we will have an updated chart showing our rolling seven day average based on date of test collection, as well as new data on hospitalizations and ER visits. The trends are going in the right direction but we must continue to be diligent about mask wearing, social distancing, hand-washing and avoiding unnecessary trips and indoor places where masks cannot be or are not being worn one hundred percent of the time,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.



All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found HERE and all guidance documents can be found HERE.

UPDATED – Dallas County Health and Human Services Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Summary – August 28, 2020

Specific Guidance for the Public:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Avoid close contact outside your home: Put 6 feet of distance between yourself and people who don’t live in your household.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others and continue to keep about 6 feet between yourself and others. The cloth face cover is not a substitute for social distancing.
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands often and with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-base hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces daily using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash. If you do not have a tissue, use your sleeve, not your hands. Immediately wash your hands.
  • Monitor your health daily. Be alert for symptoms. Take your temperature and follow CDC guidance if symptoms develop.

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 127 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

The City of Duncanville is within Dallas County and Dallas County Health and Human Services is the lead agency in charge of gathering and reporting this information.


As of 1:00 PM August 30, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 360 additional confirmed cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total confirmed case count in Dallas County to 71,170, including 901 confirmed deaths. The total number of probable cases in Dallas County is 2,895, including 8 probable deaths from COVID-19. Of the 360 new cases we are reporting today, 241 came through the Texas Department of State Health Services’ (DSHS) electronic laboratory reporting (ELR) system, and 233 were from previous months, with over 90% from the months of April through June. Please see a provisional breakdown below of these newly reported cases by date of collection:

Month# of positive patients
March # of positive patients March 5* (from same lab—likelihood of
date entry error from lab being investigated)
April88
May64
June72
July4
August8

The additional death being reported today is of a woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital, and had underlying high risk health conditions.

From August 8th through 21st, 393 school-aged children between 5 to 18 years of age were diagnosed with COVID-19 in Dallas County. About 50% of these cases were high school age. By zip code of residence, 203 (51%) of these children were projected to have been enrolled in Dallas ISD schools.

Of all confirmed cases requiring hospitalization to date, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19. The provisional 7-day average daily new confirmed and probable cases (by date of test collection) for CDC week 34 was 206.

The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 continues to decline but remains high, with 11.0% of symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals testing positive in week 34. Of the total confirmed deaths reported to date, about 26% have been associated with long-term care facilities. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. Due to weekend reporting, new data will be available on Tuesday, September 1, 2020.



All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found HERE and all guidance documents can be found HERE.

UPDATED – Dallas County Health and Human Services Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Summary – August 28, 2020

Specific Guidance for the Public:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Avoid close contact outside your home: Put 6 feet of distance between yourself and people who don’t live in your household.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others and continue to keep about 6 feet between yourself and others. The cloth face cover is not a substitute for social distancing.
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands often and with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-base hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces daily using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash. If you do not have a tissue, use your sleeve, not your hands. Immediately wash your hands.
  • Monitor your health daily. Be alert for symptoms. Take your temperature and follow CDC guidance if symptoms develop.

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 395 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

The City of Duncanville is within Dallas County and Dallas County Health and Human Services is the lead agency in charge of gathering and reporting this information.


As of 1:00 PM August 29, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 434 additional confirmed cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total confirmed case count in Dallas County to 70,810, including 900 confirmed deaths. The total number of probable cases in Dallas County is 2,875, including 8 probable deaths from COVID-19. Of the 434 new cases we are reporting today, 65 came through the Texas Department of State Health Services’ (DSHS) electronic laboratory reporting (ELR) system and 60% were from the months of April through July. Please see a provisional breakdown below of these newly reported cases by date of collection:

Month# of positive patients
April2
May11
June13
July13
August26

The additional 2 deaths being reported today include the following:

  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Irving. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.

From August 8th through 21st, 393 school-aged children between 5 to 18 years of age were diagnosed with COVID-19 in Dallas County. About 50% of these cases were high school age. By zip code of residence, 203 (51%) of these children were projected to have been enrolled in Dallas ISD schools.

Of all confirmed cases requiring hospitalization to date, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19. The provisional 7-day average daily new confirmed and probable cases (by date of test collection) for CDC week 34 was 206. The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 continues to decline but remains high, with 11.0% of symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals testing positive in week 34.

Of the total confirmed deaths reported to date, about 26% have been associated with long-term care facilities. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. There were 404 COVID-19 patients in acute care in Dallas County for the period ending Friday, August 28. The number of emergency room visits for COVID-19 like symptoms in Dallas County was 431 in the 24 hour period ending Friday, August 28, which represents around 19 percent of all emergency department visits in the county according to information reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council. While these numbers represent a significant decline from record highs, the disruptive impact of COVID-19 on our populations and health care systems remains. You can find additional information on risk-level monitoring data HERE.

“Today we have 395 new cases of COVID-19 as 39 were old cases from the State’s still troubled electronic laboratory reporting (ELR) system, so the total number of cases for the day is 434. As you know, we’ve given you rolling averages of new daily cases from Sunday to Saturday, and for this week that number is 320, compared to 1501 last week; however, with the backlog from the State’s ELR system, that number is less accurate and therefore less meaningful. Our team at Dallas County Health and Human Services is tracking all cases by the date the COVID-19 test is collected and tracks the daily average of new cases by CDC week. For the week ending August 15th, our daily average of new cases was 299 and for the week ending August 22nd, that average has dropped to 206. I’ve included the chart below to show the positive trend we’re seeing as the daily average of new cases continues to drop week to week.

Today we are also reporting two deaths from COVID_19, bringing us to the grim milestone of 900 deaths to date in Dallas County from confirmed cases of COVID-19. Additionally, there are eight total probable deaths from COVID-19.

It is hot out there and masks can be inconvenient but it is imperative that we all wear our mask, maintain six foot distance, frequently wash our hands, avoid unnecessary trips and avoid any activity where you are indoors or around others and everyone cannot wear their mask one hundred percent of the time. If we continue doing this, we’ll continue to see gains, we’ll have less sickness and death, more businesses will stay open and our kids can get back to school sooner rather than later. We all have a role to play, and it’s everyone’s job to make smart decisions and to follow the science which can be found at www.DallasCountyCOVID.org,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.



All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found HERE and all guidance documents can be found HERE.

UPDATED – Dallas County Health and Human Services Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Summary – August 28, 2020

Specific Guidance for the Public:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Avoid close contact outside your home: Put 6 feet of distance between yourself and people who don’t live in your household.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others and continue to keep about 6 feet between yourself and others. The cloth face cover is not a substitute for social distancing.
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands often and with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-base hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces daily using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash. If you do not have a tissue, use your sleeve, not your hands. Immediately wash your hands.
  • Monitor your health daily. Be alert for symptoms. Take your temperature and follow CDC guidance if symptoms develop.

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Mosquito Spraying Scheduled For August 27 and 28

The City of Duncanville, at the recommendation and in cooperation with Dallas County Health and Human Services (DCHHS), will be conducting ground spraying against mosquitoes on Thursday, August 27 and Friday, August 28, between the hours of 9:00 PM and 5:00 AM, weather permitting. The spraying is being conducted in response to the detection of West Nile Virus in two mosquito traps located in the 75116 and 75137 zip codes. If the weather prohibits spraying on Thursday night, spraying will be conducted on Friday and Saturday nights. Spraying will be performed in targeted areas within the City of Duncanville (see the attached map).

 

City staff will continue to monitor areas where mosquito breeding is most likely to occur. To prevent the spread of mosquitoes, residents should remove all areas of standing water. Residents should also report all pools that are not well maintained and abandoned homes where mosquitoes are likely to breed to either City of Duncanville Health Services or Code Enforcement. Everyone should continue to protect themselves against the West Nile Virus by using insect repellent containing DEET. Citizens are also encouraged to remain indoors during dawn and dusk when mosquitoes are most active.

For more information on the scheduled ground mosquito spraying in Duncanville, contact Tammy Island at 972-707-4963.


The City of Duncanville has a limited supply of Summit MosquitoDunks available on the West Side of City Hall, Building Inspections desk. Drop by today and pick up a MosquitoDunk for yourself today. Limit one package per household.

Dallas County Reports 219 (160 New) Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

The City of Duncanville is within Dallas County and Dallas County Health and Human Services is the lead agency in charge of gathering and reporting this information.


As of 1:00 PM August 27, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 219 additional confirmed cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total confirmed case count in Dallas County to 70,100, including 895 confirmed deaths. The total number of probable cases in Dallas County is 2,784, including 8 probable deaths from COVID-19. Of the 219 new cases we are reporting today, 59 came through the Texas Department of State Health Services’ (DSHS) electronic laboratory reporting (ELR) system and the majority are from the months of June and July. Please see a provisional breakdown below of these newly reported cases by date of collection:

Month# of positive patients
June18
July36
August5

The additional 5 deaths being reported today include the following:

  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Richardson. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Cedar Hill. He had been hospitalized.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions

From August 1st to 14th, 531 school-aged children between 5 to 18 years of age were reported to have been diagnosed with confirmed COVID-19. About 50% of these cases were high school age. By zip code of residence, 302 (57%) of these children were projected to have been enrolled in Dallas ISD schools. Of all confirmed cases requiring hospitalization to date, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

The 7-day average daily new confirmed and probable COVID-19 cases (by date of test collection) for CDC week 33 was 295. The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 has been declining but remains high, with about 12.8% of symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals testing positive in week 33. Of the total confirmed deaths reported to date, about 26% have been associated with longterm care facilities. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. There were 388 COVID-19 patients in acute care in Dallas County for the period ending Wednesday, August 26. The number of emergency room visits for COVID-19 like symptoms in Dallas County was 512 in the 24 hour period ending Wednesday, August 26, which represents around 21 percent of all emergency department visits in the county according to information reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council. While these numbers represent a significant decline from record highs, the disruptive impact of COVID-19 on our populations and health care systems remains. You can find additional information on risk-level monitoring data HERE.

“Today’s new COVID-19 positive numbers continue a trend of lower cases. We have a total of 165 [sic] cases that can be contributed to newer cases and 54 [sic] cases from previous months that were found in the State’s electronic laboratory system. The good trends we’re seeing are the result of you wearing a mask, maintaining six-foot distancing, washing your hands frequently, and avoiding unnecessary trips and indoor crowds where anyone is not wearing a mask one hundred percent of the time. If we keep our resolve for focusing on the community good, to keep not only ourselves but our community healthy, less people will get sick, more businesses will stay open so our neighbors will keep their jobs, and our kids can get back to school sooner rather than later.

I’m pleased with the response to helping our neighbors on the coast with the hurricane evacuation. I’d like to give a special thank you to the cities of Dallas, Farmers Branch, Irving, Mesquite, and Richardson, as well as emergency managers in all of our Dallas County cities and jurisdictions for their great work and coming together to provide hotel rooms and assistance to families. Many of our charitable partners stepped up as well. There were acts of kindness that the public never sees. For instance, the DeSoto Fire Department took a spur of the moment donation from a firehouse to gather $100 for diapers and supplies for a family of 11 who was in need of assistance.

Our first responders are heroes and that is on display in 2020 like never before. We all have a role to play and everyone’s is to follow the medical advice that you can find on www.DallasCountyCOVID.org about how to keep you and your family safe from COVID-19,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.



All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found HERE and all guidance documents can be found HERE.

UPDATED – Dallas County Health and Human Services Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Summary – August 25, 2020

Specific Guidance for the Public:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Avoid close contact outside your home: Put 6 feet of distance between yourself and people who don’t live in your household.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others and continue to keep about 6 feet between yourself and others. The cloth face cover is not a substitute for social distancing.
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands often and with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-base hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces daily using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash. If you do not have a tissue, use your sleeve, not your hands. Immediately wash your hands.
  • Monitor your health daily. Be alert for symptoms. Take your temperature and follow CDC guidance if symptoms develop.

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 578 (154 New) Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

The City of Duncanville is within Dallas County and Dallas County Health and Human Services is the lead agency in charge of gathering and reporting this information.


As of 1:00 PM August 26, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 578 additional confirmed cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total confirmed case count in Dallas County to 69,881, including 890 confirmed deaths. The total number of probable cases in Dallas County is 2,746, including 8 probable deaths from COVID-19. Of the 578 new cases we are reporting today, 424 came through the Texas Department of State Health Services’ (DSHS) electronic laboratory reporting (ELR) system and the majority are from the months of April and May. Please see a provisional breakdown below of these newly reported cases by date of collection:

Month# of positive patients
March6
April116
May271
June31

The additional 9 deaths being reported today include the following:

  • A man in his 40’s who was a resident of the City of Wilmer. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 40’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 50’s who was a resident of the City of Irving. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Richardson. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Farmers Branch. She was found deceased at home and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Lancaster. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Mesquite. He expired in an area hospital ED and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Lancaster. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.

From August 1st to 14th, 531 school-aged children between 5 to 18 years of age were reported to have been diagnosed with confirmed COVID-19. About 50% of these cases were high school age. By zip code of residence, 302 (57%) of these children were projected to have been enrolled in Dallas ISD schools. Of all confirmed cases requiring hospitalization to date, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19. The 7-day average daily new confirmed and probable COVID-19 cases (by date of test collection) for CDC week 33 was 295.

The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 has been declining but remains high, with about 12.8% of symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals testing positive in week 33. Of the total confirmed deaths reported to date, about 26% have been associated with long-term care facilities. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. There were 408 COVID-19 patients in acute care in Dallas County for the period ending Tuesday, August 25. The number of emergency room visits for COVID-19 like symptoms in Dallas County was 491 in the 24 hour period ending Tuesday, August 25, which represents around 20 percent of all emergency department visits in the county according to information reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council. While these numbers represent a significant decline from record highs, the disruptive impact of COVID-19 on our populations and health care systems remains. You can find additional information on risk-level monitoring data HERE.

Additionally, Figure 1 and Table 11 below are from the August 25, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Summary (attached). Figure 1 shows the confirmed COVID-19 positive cases by date of test collection. This chart includes all delayed results that were received by DCHHS as of 8:00 pm Monday. Table 11 is a summary of confirmed and probable cases and deaths over the past five weeks and shows a decline in the daily average of new cases in Dallas County.

“Today we continue the trend of a low number of new COVID-19 positive cases with 154 cases in the month of August. The total number is 578 cases but 424 of those are cases from earlier months that were lost in the State’s electronic laboratory reporting (ELR) system. Unfortunately, it is possible that the State is also losing cases that were done recently and not reporting those cases timely, but we can look at hospitalizations and other factors, not relying on the State’s ELR system, and see that the trends are moving in a positive direction. We are also involved in helping hundreds of families from the coast get refuge, meals and services here in Dallas County by placing them in hotels and providing them with services in their time of need. North Texans should be proud of their welcoming spirit and how the people of Dallas County always step up to help neighbors in need. This will be done without increased risk of infection to the community. The people fleeing Hurricane Laura are no more likely to have COVID-19 than members of the general population anywhere in Texas, and the services that we’ll provide to them, including COVID-19 testing, will be done from our excess capacity so no one in Dallas County will be denied a COVID-19 test or services due to the services being provided to our neighbors from the Texas coast.

In order to keep less people from getting sick, more businesses open, and get our kids back to school sooner rather than later, it’s important that we all continue to wear our mask, maintain six-foot distancing, use good hand hygiene, and forgo unnecessary trips until the numbers go down further. Medical experts strongly advise that you should not participate in any indoor activity or frequent any indoor establishment where masks cannot be or are not being worn one hundred percent of the time,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins



All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found HERE and all guidance documents can be found HERE.

UPDATED – Dallas County Health and Human Services Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Summary – August 25, 2020

Specific Guidance for the Public:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Avoid close contact outside your home: Put 6 feet of distance between yourself and people who don’t live in your household.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others and continue to keep about 6 feet between yourself and others. The cloth face cover is not a substitute for social distancing.
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands often and with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-base hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces daily using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash. If you do not have a tissue, use your sleeve, not your hands. Immediately wash your hands.
  • Monitor your health daily. Be alert for symptoms. Take your temperature and follow CDC guidance if symptoms develop.

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 217 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

The City of Duncanville is within Dallas County and Dallas County Health and Human Services is the lead agency in charge of gathering and reporting this information.


As of 2:00 PM August 25, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 217 additional confirmed cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total confirmed case count in Dallas County to 69,303, including 881 confirmed deaths. The total number of probable cases in Dallas County is 2,740, including 8 probable deaths from COVID-19. None of these cases we are reporting today are from the State’s electronic laboratory system.

The additional 24 deaths being reported today include the following:

  • A man in his 30’s who was a resident of the City of Mesquite. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 30’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 40’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She expired in an area hospital ED and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Balch Springs. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of DeSoto. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.

A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Duncanville. She had been critically ill in an area hospital, and had underlying high risk health conditions.

  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. He expired in an area hospital ED.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been hospitalized.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of DeSoto. She had been hospitalized and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 80’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Lancaster. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of the City of Mesquite. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 90’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.

From August 1st to 14th, 531 school-aged children between 5 to 18 years of age were reported to have been diagnosed with confirmed COVID-19. About 50% of these cases were high school age. By zip code of residence, 302 (57%) of these children were projected to have been enrolled in Dallas ISD schools.

Of all confirmed cases requiring hospitalization to date, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19. The 7-day average daily new confirmed and probable COVID-19 cases (by date of test collection) for CDC week 33 was 295. The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARSCoV-2 has been declining but remains high, with about 12.8% of symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals testing positive in week 33.

Of the total confirmed deaths reported to date, about 26% have been associated with long-term care facilities. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays. Tuesday’s report is attached.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. There were 400 COVID-19 patients in acute care in Dallas County for the period ending Monday, August 24. The number of emergency room visits for COVID-19 like symptoms in Dallas County was 381 in the 24 hour period ending Monday, August 24, which represents around 20 percent of all emergency department visits in the county according to information reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council. While these numbers represent a significant decline from record highs, the disruptive impact of COVID-19 on our populations and health care systems remains. You can find additional information on risk-level monitoring data HERE.

Additionally, Figure 1 and Table 11 below are from the August 25, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Summary (attached). Figure 1 shows the confirmed COVID-19 positive cases by date of test collection. This chart includes all delayed results that were received by DCHHS as of 8:00 pm Monday. Table 11 is a summary of confirmed and probable cases and deaths over the past five weeks and shows a decline in the daily average of new cases in Dallas County.

“Today we have a total of 217 new confirmed positive cases of COVID-19, none of which are from the State’s electronic laboratory reporting system. Additionally we have 24 deaths including two men in their 30’s, one who did not have any underlying high-risk health conditions. We are seeing a continuing good trend in lowering numbers of infections and hospitalizations. We must not lose our resolve to do the things that have caused that turn in the right direction, namely masking, six-foot distancing, frequent hand washing, avoiding unnecessary trips, and avoiding any indoor activity where the people around you cannot be masked one hundred percent of the time. It’s up to all of us to combat COVID-19 and everyone must make good personal decisions for community health to be successful.

I also signed today an emergency disaster declaration for purposes of setting up a system to provide hotel rooms to people displaced from the coming hurricane. The people coming to Dallas-Fort Worth will not be staying in group shelters, rather they will be staying in hotel rooms. The County and City of Dallas will front the money for this expense to be one hundred percent reimbursed by the State of Texas.

We train for these emergencies constantly and hurricanes and tropical storms are a part of life here in Texas. I’m confident that our team can provide the assistance and resources needed to our fellow Texans in need of assistance without delaying or impeding our COVID-19 response and other responsibilities to the people of Dallas County and North Texas,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.



All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found HERE and all guidance documents can be found HERE.

UPDATED – Dallas County Health and Human Services Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Summary – August 25, 2020

Specific Guidance for the Public:

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Avoid close contact outside your home: Put 6 feet of distance between yourself and people who don’t live in your household.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others and continue to keep about 6 feet between yourself and others. The cloth face cover is not a substitute for social distancing.
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands often and with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-base hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces daily using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash. If you do not have a tissue, use your sleeve, not your hands. Immediately wash your hands.
  • Monitor your health daily. Be alert for symptoms. Take your temperature and follow CDC guidance if symptoms develop.

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/