Governor Abbott Issues Executive Order, Implements Statewide Essential Services And Activities Protocols

Governor Greg Abbott today issued an Executive Order implementing Essential Services and Activities Protocols for the entire state of Texas. The protocols direct all Texans to minimize non-essential gatherings and in-person contact with people who are not in the same household. The Governor’s Executive Order renews and amends his previous order enforcing federal social distancing guidelines for COVID-19, including closing schools and instructing Texans to avoid eating or drinking at bars and restaurants. The protocols allow exceptions for essential activities and services based on the Department of Homeland Security’s guidelines on the Essential Critical Infrastructure Workforce. Examples of these essential services include healthcare, grocery stores, banking and financial services, utilities, child care for essential service employees, and government services. 

Today’s Executive Order follows the decision by President Trump and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to enhance social distancing guidelines and extend the deadline for these guidelines to April 30th.

Governor Abbott was joined for the announcement by Lieutenant Governor Dan Patrick, House Speaker Dennis Bonnen, Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) Commissioner John Hellerstedt, MD, Texas Division of Emergency Management (TDEM) Chief Nim Kidd, and Texas Education Agency (TEA) Commissioner Mike Morath.

“Social distancing is our best tool in the fight against COVID-19, and the actions we have taken thus far have proven to be effective in limiting the spread of this virus,” said Governor Abbott. “Now it is time to redouble our efforts to reduce further exposure as much as possible and flatten the curve. As with all the actions the state is taking, the Essential Services and Activities Protocols is informed by the expertise and guidance of the CDC as well as state and local health officials. I urge my fellow Texans to heed these heightened social distancing directives to protect their health and the health of those around them. By following these guidelines, we will limit the spread of COVID-19 and overcome this challenge together.”

The Executive Order renews and expands the Governor’s previous directive to minimize social gatherings and minimize contact with people who are not in the same household. It also renews the Governor’s directive to avoid eating or drinking at bars, restaurants, and food courts, and visiting gyms or massage establishments, and it expands the order to include tattoo studios, piercing studios, and cosmetology salons. 

In accordance with federal guidelines, people are still prohibited from visiting nursing home, state supported living centers, assisted living facilities, or long-term care facilities unless to provide critical assistance. Additionally, schools will remain temporarily closed to in-person classroom attendance through May 4, 2020.

This Executive Order does not prohibit people from accessing essential services or engaging in essential daily activities, such as going to the grocery store or gas station, providing or obtaining other essential services, hunting or fishing, or engaging in physical activity like jogging or bicycling, so long as the necessary precautions are maintained to reduce the transmission of COVID-19 and to minimize in-person contact with people who are not in the same household. The order also includes exemption for religious services conducted in churches, congregations, and houses of worship. All critical infrastructure will remain operational, and government entities and businesses will continue providing essential services.

TDEM will maintain an online list of essential services specified in the Governor’s Executive Order at www.tdem.texas.gov/essentialservices/. Other essential services may be added to this list with the approval of TDEM.

These orders will be effective on a statewide basis starting at 12:01 AM on April 2, 2020 and will end on April 30, 2020, subject to extension thereafter based on the status of COVID-19 in Texas and the recommendations of the CDC.

View the Governor’s Executive Order.


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 82 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

DALLAS — As of 10:00 am March 31, 2020, DCHHS is reporting 82 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total case count in Dallas County to 631.  The 12th and 13th deaths from COVID-19  are being reported, including of a man in his 50’s who was as resident of the city of Rowlett, and a man in his 90’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas.  Both persons had other high-risk chronic health conditions. There are 26 COVID-19 cases associated with long-term care facilities, including 2 deaths, that have been reported within the past week. The numbers of intensive care unit hospitalizations from COVID-19 from this past week have exceeded the peek week of ICU hospitalizations from influenza this past 2019-2020 season in Dallas County.

Please see attached summary.  New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays. 

“We are at the beginning of what will be a difficult time for Texas, especially here. We need each one of you to #StayInTheFight! To do that, I need you to practice self-care, have faith in the science, and #StaySafebyStayingHome,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins

All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/

Most employees who work within the City of Dallas have a right to paid sick leave. Employees of private businesses and nonprofits with six or more employees in Dallas can use their paid sick leave when they are sick or to care for sick family members.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-base hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.  If you do not have a tissue, use your sleeve, not your hands.

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

The Top COVID-19 Scams

Scammers follow the headlines

Source: The Senior Source

RobocallsHANG UP!

Scammers or scammy companies use illegal robocalls to profit from Coronavirus-related fears – posing as the IRS or Medicare. Visit the Federal Trade Commission’s website to hear scam calls: ftc.gov/coronavirus.

Testing Scam

Scammers are calling or knocking on doors in white lab coats or hazmat gear claiming to be with the Center for Disease Control and Prevention selling fake at-home Coronavirus tests.

Treatment Scam

Scammers are calling or knocking on doors in white lab coats or hazmat gear claiming to be with the Center for Disease Control and Prevention selling fake cures, vaccines, and medical advice on unproven treatments.

Supply Scam

Scammers are creating fake shops, websites, social media accounts, and email addresses to sell medical supplies in high demand, like surgical masks. When you try to purchase supplies, they pocket the money.

Provider Scam

Scammers are contacting people by phone and email, pretending to be doctors and hospitals that have treated a friend or family member for COVID-19 and demanding payment.

Charity Scam

Scammers are soliciting donations for individuals, groups, and areas impacted by coronavirus.

Phishing Scam

Scammers are sending emails posing as health officials, including the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. They want to trick you into downloading malware or providing personal identification and financial information.

App Scam

Scammers are creating and controlling mobile apps used to track the spread of COVID-19. If used, these apps insert malware on your device that steals your personal and financial information.

Compassion & Romance Scams

Scammers will use this opportunity to prey on your vulnerability while you are contained and isolated to your home, developing a friendship or romantic relationship with you to gain your trust and obtain your personal and financial information.


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

COVID-19: FAQs FOR ANIMAL OWNER

The following FAQ was provided by the Texas Animal Health Commission.

What are coronaviruses?

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses. Some strains affect animals, while others affect people. The majority of coronaviruses stick to their own species. COVID-19 has not been proven to circulate between people and animals.

Can animals become ill with or spread COVID-19?

There is no evidence at this time that animals can become ill with COVID-19 or that they can spread it to other animals or people. To date, the CDC has not received any reports of pets or other animals becoming sick with COVID-19 in the United States.

Please see the CDC Animals and Coronavirus Disease 2019 webpage for additional information.

Can pets serve as fomites in the spread of COVID-19?

At this time, there is no evidence that the virus that causes COVID-19 can spread to people from the skin or fur of pets. COVID-19 appears to be primarily transmitted by contact with an infected person’s bodily secretions, such as saliva or mucus droplets in a cough or sneeze.

COVID-19 might be able to be transmitted by touching a contaminated surface or object (i.e., a fomite) and then touching the mouth, nose, or possibly eyes, but this appears to be a secondary route. Smooth (nonporous) surfaces (e.g., countertops, door knobs) transmit viruses better than porous materials (e.g., paper money, pet fur), because porous, and especially fibrous, materials absorb and trap the pathogen (virus), making it harder to contract through simple touch.

Because your pet’s hair is porous and also fibrous, it is very unlikely that you would contract COVID-19 by petting or playing with your pet. However, because animals can spread other diseases to people and people can also spread diseases to animals, it’s always a good idea to wash your hands before and after interacting with animals; ensure your pet is kept well- groomed; and regularly clean your pet’s food and water bowls, bedding material, and toys.

Can I bring my animal into the veterinarian for care?

If you are healthy and your pet needs to see a veterinarian, please call before bringing them in to the vet. Veterinary clinics are taking precautions and may have a special operating procedure that you will be asked to follow.

If you are sick with COVID-19 or another communicable disease, you should stay at home, minimizing contact with other people, until you are well. Accordingly, if it is a non-urgent appointment for your pet or service animal consider rescheduling the appointment until your physician and/or your public health official believes you no longer present a risk of transmitting your infection to other people you may encounter during such a visit, including owners of pets or other animals and veterinary clinic staff.

Can I have contact with my animal if I am ill with COVID-19?

You should restrict contact with pets and other animals while you are sick with COVID-19, just like you would around other people. Although there have not been reports of pets or other animals becoming sick with COVID-19, it is still recommended that people sick with COVID-19 limit contact with animals until more information is known about the new coronavirus.

When possible, have another member of your household care for your animals while you are sick. If you are sick with COVID-19, avoid contact with your pet, including petting, snuggling, being kissed or licked, and sharing food.

If you are the only caretaker for your animal or you have a service dog; do not kiss, hug or have “face-to-face” contact with them. When in contact with your animal’s items (toys, food dishes, etc.) always wash your hands with soap and water before and after handling.

What should I do to prepare for my animal’s care if I am hospitalized for COVID-19?

Identify another person in your household or community who is willing and able to care for your pet. Make sure you have an emergency kit prepared, with at least two weeks’ worth of your pet’s food and any needed medications.

Can my animals be vaccinated for COVID-19?

There is no evidence at this time that animals can become ill with COVID-19 or that they can spread it to other animals or people.

While there are livestock and companion animal coronavirus vaccines available, animal owners should be aware these vaccines provide protection against other specific coronaviruses and not the virus causing COVID-19.

Can the animal coronavirus vaccine protect me from getting COVID-19?

The livestock and companion animal coronavirus vaccines are not approved for use in people. These vaccines are intended for use in animals only and do not protect against COVID-19.

Should my animal be tested for COVID-19?

At this time, general animal testing for COVID-19 is not recommended by the CDC or Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) since there is currently no evidence that animals can become sick with COVID-19.

If your pet is showing signs of a respiratory infection, consult with your veterinarian so they can asses the animal for common respiratory illnesses.

Are there any livestock movement restrictions?

There are currently no movement restrictions on livestock in the U.S. related to COVID-19.

Are livestock markets open?

Livestock markets are open and continue to operate across the U.S. and Texas. Please contact your local market if you have questions. Please note, livestock markets are working with their state and local public health officials to implement appropriate measures to reduce the spread of COVID-19.

Resources CDC: Animals and Coronavirus Disease 2019

American Veterinary Medical Association: COVID-19

American Veterinary Medical Association: COVID-19

Texas Veterinary Medical Association: COVID-19 Resources


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 61 Additional COVID-19 Cases with the Total Case Count at 549

As of 10:00 am March 30, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 61 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total case count in Dallas County to 549.  The 11th death from COVID-19 is being reported, of a man in his 40’s who was found deceased in his residence in the city of Dallas.  This individual was reported to have had other high-risk chronic health conditions. Of cases requiring hospitalization to date, about two-thirds (65%) have been either over 60 years of age or have had at least one known high-risk chronic health condition. Hospitalizations from COVID-19 are increasing, with 36% of all hospitalized patients requiring admission to intensive care units.

New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays. 

“We are working collaboratively with industry and working groups to ensure that our essential business employees are as safe as possible. These front line workers are supply chain heroes. We are also asking our community to please be careful on our parks and trails. Social distancing is physical distancing and physical distancing is at least 6 feet. If you are jogging past 500 people going the opposite direction on a trail, you’re breathing droplets on the trail from all of those people, and likewise they are breathing yours. A lack of compliance with physical distancing only increases the chance that more people will get sick and lengthens the time before we get the economy moving again,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins

All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/

Mayor Gordon Amends Shelter in Place Order to Include Further Definitions, Provisions and Price Gouging Prohibitions

On March 30, 2020, Mayor Barry Gordon signed an amended public health order that mirrors the order Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins issued, which went into effect at 9:00 pm on March 29, 2020. 

The amended order includes the following changes:

  1. Prohibits self-serve food and beverage dispensers
  2. Prohibits customers from standing inside a restaurant to wait on their order
  3. Prohibits gas and convenience stores from selling self-service food and beverage items
  4. Issued new orders pertaining to the Construction Industry and Long-Term Health Facilities
  5. Added “Minimum Basic Operations” Language
    • Allows non-essential businesses to do the following:
      • The minimum necessary activities to maintain the value of the business’s inventory, ensure security, process payroll and employee benefits, or for related functions.
      • The minimum necessary activities to facilitate employees of the business being able to continue to work remotely from their residences.
  6. Added “Essential Travel” Language
    • Includes travel for any of the following purposes:
      • Travel related to the provision of or access to Essential Activities, Essential Governmental Functions, Essential Businesses Essential Critical Infrastructure, and Minimum Basic Operation;
      • Travel to care for elderly, minors, dependents, persons with disabilities, or other vulnerable persons;
      • Travel to or from educational institutions for purposes of receiving materials for distance learning, for receiving meals, and any other related services;
      • Travel to return to a place of residence from outside the jurisdiction;
      • Travel required by law enforcement or court order;
      • Travel by church staff or clergy for the purpose of production of remote delivery of religious services and other ministries requiring travel;
      • Travel related to attending a funeral service; or
      • Travel required for non-residents to return to their place of residence outside the County.
  7. Added Safety Provisions for Contractors
    • The Order classified construction for public works, residential, commercial, and schools as critical infrastructure. Elective additions and maintenance are prohibited.
    • All employers involved in construction activity must follow the requirements set forth in the COVID-19 Safety Recommendations issued by the Construction Industry Safety Coalition.
  8. Added Prohibition on Price Gouging
    • No person shall sell any of the following goods or services for more than the regular retail price the person charged for the goods or services on March 16, 2020:
      • groceries, beverages, toilet articles, and ice;
      • restaurant, cafeteria, and boarding-house meals; and
      • medicine, pharmaceutical and medical equipment, and supplies.

View the amended March 30, 2020 Duncanville Order.

March 29, 2020 Amended Order of County Judge Clay Jenkins

U.S. Attorney William M. McSwain Warns about Fraud Related to the Coronavirus Crisis and Provides Tips to the Public

U.S. Attorney William M. McSwain warned the public today about the growing number and variety of fraud schemes associated with the coronavirus. He offered guidance to help prevent the public from being victimized by these frauds.  

“Over the past few weeks, there has been a significant number of frauds committed across the country related to the coronavirus pandemic,” said U.S. Attorney McSwain. “The fact that criminals seek to exploit the pandemic by preying on the worries and fears of the public in this difficult time is despicable. My Office will continue to work closely with our law enforcement partners to protect the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. We will leave no stone unturned to find these criminals and bring them to justice.”

Below are some of the known fraudulent schemes related to the coronavirus pandemic:

  • Fake cures: Fraudsters are advertising fake cures, fake vaccines, and so-called “immunity” pills, and including wild claims about the products’ healing powers with no scientific or medical basis.
  • Fake testing: Fraudsters are selling fake at-home testing kits or going door-to-door performing fraudulent tests in exchange for money.
  • Health care frauds: Fraudsters are offering free (and phony) coronavirus testing to obtain Medicare or other healthcare insurance information, which they use to submit false claims for benefits.
  • Fake protection and supplies: Fraudsters are advertising fake or un-tested protective equipment (including respirator masks) through websites, social media, and robocalls. The fraudsters have no real equipment to sell, or provide equipment that has not been proven to work for its advertised purpose.
  • Phishing: Fraudsters are posing as representatives from well-known institutions, such as the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in order to trick victims into downloading malware or providing personal identifying and financial information.
  • Fake health care providers: Fraudsters pose as doctors or hospital employees and contact individuals via phone or email. They make false claims that they treated a relative or friend for coronavirus and demand money for the claimed treatment.
  • Identity theft: Fraudsters are using social media to fraudulently seek donations or provide stimulus funds if the victim provides a bank account number or other personal identifying information. The fraudsters use the information entered by the victim to impersonate the victim and steal money from the victim’s bank account.
  • Securities fraud: Fraudsters are promoting securities in publicly traded companies that they falsely claim have discovered the cure for coronavirus.
  • Fake charities: Fraudsters are soliciting donations for charities to allegedly benefit people affected by the virus and pocketing the money for themselves. 

The U.S. Attorney’s Office urges everyone to follow these tips to better protect themselves from these types of fraud schemes:

  1. Ignore unsolicited offers for coronavirus cures, vaccines, pills, or treatment.  If there is a medical breakthrough, you will not hear about it first through an email, advertisement, or door-to-door sales pitch. Be aware that fraudsters often use addresses that differ only slightly from the entities that they are impersonating, such as “cdc.com” or “cdc.org” instead of “cdc.gov.”
  2. Do not share personal information with strangers. Be extremely cautious about unsolicited emails or ads that request your personal information for any purpose. Legitimate healthcare providers will not call or email you and demand medical information, personal identifying information, or money for treatment they have provided to a friend or relative. Report the contact to law enforcement. 
  3. Do not open emails or links from unknown sources. In doing so, you could download malware or a virus onto your computer or device. 
  4. Be extremely cautious when sending money in any form. If a business, charity, or individual is requesting payments or donations in cash, by wire transfer, gift card, or through the mail, be careful. Take extra steps to verify the identity of the receiving party and the security of the transaction.
  5. Have up-to-date software protections on your devices. Be sure the anti-virus and anti-malware software on your computer or device is operating and up-to-date.

If you or someone you know has been the target or victim of a fraud scheme related to the coronavirus, please report the incident to the national hotline at The National Center for Disaster Fraud at 1-866-720-5721 or at disaster@leo.gov


justice.com/coronavirus


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Amended Shelter in Place Order with Additional Definitions, Safety Provisions, and Price Gouging Prohibitions

March 29 Dallas County Order | Rules for Construction Industry
Order Regarding Long-Term Health Facilities

Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins issued an amended order effective at 11:59 PM on March 29, 2020 that further refined what is deemed as essential business.

  1. Added “Minimum Basic Operations” Language
    • Allows non-essential businesses to do the following:
      • The minimum necessary activities to maintain the value of the business’s inventory, ensure security, process payroll and employee benefits, or for related functions.
      • The minimum necessary activities to facilitate employees of the business being able to continue to work remotely from their residences.
  2. Added “Essential Travel” Language
    • Includes travel for any of the following purposes:
      • Travel related to the provision of or access to Essential Activities, Essential Governmental Functions, Essential Businesses Essential Critical Infrastructure, and Minimum Basic Operation;
      • Travel to care for elderly, minors, dependents, persons with disabilities, or other vulnerable persons;
      • Travel to or from educational institutions for purposes of receiving materials for distance learning, for receiving meals, and any other related services;
      • Travel to return to a place of residence from outside the jurisdiction;
      • Travel required by law enforcement or court order;
      • Travel by church staff or clergy for the purpose of production of remote delivery of religious services and other ministries requiring travel;
      • Travel related to attending a funeral service; or
      • Travel required for non-residents to return to their place of residence outside the County.
  3. Added Safety Provisions for Contractors
    • The Order classified construction for public works, residential, commercial, and schools as critical infrastructure. Elective additions and maintenance are prohibited.
    • All employers involved in construction activity must follow the requirements set forth in the COVID-19 Safety Recommendations issued by the Construction Industry Safety Coalition.
  4. Added Prohibition on Price Gouging
    • No person shall sell any of the following goods or services for more than the regular retail price the person charged for the goods or services on March 16, 2020:
      • groceries, beverages, toilet articles, and ice;
      • restaurant, cafeteria, and boarding-house meals; and
      • medicine, pharmaceutical and medical equipment, and supplies.
  5. Re-formatted the Order

March 29, 2020 Amended Order of County Judge Clay Jenkins


March 29, 2020 Order Regarding Long-Term Care Facilities


March 29, 2020 Rules for Construction Industry


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 49 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

DALLAS — As of 10:00 am March 29, 2020, DCHHS is reporting 49 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total case count in Dallas County to 488.  The 10th death from COVID-19 is being reported, of a woman in her 80’s who had been a resident in a long-term care facility.  This individual had been hospitalized and had other high-risk chronic health conditions. Of cases requiring hospitalization to date, about two-thirds (65%) have been either over 60 years of age or have had at least one known high-risk chronic health condition.  Hospitalizations from COVID-19 are increasing, with 36% of all hospitalized patients requiring admission to intensive care units.

New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays. 

“Our seniors must be protected. We are working with senior facilities to ensure that happens. I have instructed all nursing homes with a positive case to inform all families and responsible parties immediately by phone and email. Additionally, all mentally competent residents are to be informed immediately after they wake. This includes all buildings on a campus with a positive case. They are required to show complete compliance of these notifications within six daylight hours of a positive test,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.

All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/

Most employees who work within the City of Dallas have a right to paid sick leave. Employees of private businesses and nonprofits with six or more employees in Dallas can use their paid sick leave when they are sick or to care for sick family members.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same.  If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-base hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.  If you do not have a tissue, use your sleeve, not your hands.

Additional information is available at the following websites:



For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 72 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

DALLAS — As of 10:00 am March 28, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services (DCHHS) is reporting 72 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total case count in Dallas County to 439.  The 8th and 9th deaths from COVID-19 are being reported, of a man in his 50’s who was a resident of the city of DeSoto, and a man in his 70’s who was a resident of the city of Dallas.  These individuals had been critically ill in area hospitals. Of cases requiring hospitalization to date, about two-thirds (65%) have been either over 60 years of age or have had at least one known high-risk chronic health condition.  Hospitalizations from COVID-19 are increasing, with 36% of all hospitalized patients requiring admission to intensive care units.

New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays. 

“One of today’s deaths is a man in his 50s with no known underlying conditions. This serves as a sober reminder that COVID-19 is a dangerous disease for everyone and is why it’s so important that we all need to stay home to stay safe. I am so proud of the work of our first responders, health heroes, and our executive teams, but I’m also proud of the spirit of community that we are seeing through North Texas. Together, we’ll #flattenthecurve,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.

All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/

Most employees who work within the City of Dallas have a right to paid sick leave. Employees of private businesses and nonprofits with six or more employees in Dallas can use their paid sick leave when they are sick or to care for sick family members.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same.  If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-base hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.  If you do not have a tissue, use your sleeve, not your hands.

Additional information is available at the following websites:



For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/