Staff Reads

Look away, look away. You don’t want to read these reviews. You probably wouldn’t like any of the suggestions. And even if by chance you did find one intriguing, you probably wouldn’t have time to read/watch it.

Look away, look away.

 

We’d like to know what y’all are reading too! So, please feel free to let us know in the comments.

 

Grave Peril by Jim Butcher (book 3 in the Dresden Files series)

I have figured out why these books are hard for me to read; it’s “intense situations of peril” start to finish! It’s also kind of the point of the series. If you’re fond of fantastical type things and action, you will enjoy these. I plan to keep reading them, though in small doses, especially since these come highly recommended by people close to me.

~Hannah

 

Home Comforts: The Art and Science of Keeping House by Cheryl Mendelson.

This is one I come to occasionally, read, and then leave for a while, as it’s a very practical book. I enjoy reading her descriptions of housekeeping and her opinions about what should and shouldn’t be done, and the practical tips are helpful too.

~Hannah

The Man Who Knew Too Much (dvd)

The 1956 film in glorious color about an American couple (James Stewart and Doris Day) who travel to Morocco with their ten year old son, meet a mysterious Arab who on the surface appears friendly and also not, and who ends up dead, leading to an impromptu trip to England. The dying man whispers something to Stewart’s character which turns out to be too much information that everyone else wants but he can’t safely divulge. Cliff hanger to the end. Doris Day is radiant and sings her most famous signature song, “Que Sera, Sera” (Whatever Will Be Will Be).

~Ron

The Lost Years by Mary Higgins Clark

Mary Higgins Clark has a talent for making you wonder who did it all the way to the end with her mystery stories. Her formula continues to entertain in The Lost Years. I have to admit that my guess in the cast of characters was wrong with this story, but when I found out who the real murderer was, I had to do a mental head slap because of course that person was obviously the best candidate. The fun with her stories is that the obvious doesn’t become so until the end. This was a good story, not as good as some of her other stories, but very engaging anyway.

~Stunt Clerk #3

Birth Of A Nation The Birth of a Nation (DVD)

Was Nat Turner a hero or villain? His story is brutal and eye opening. The cast did an excellent job in acting out how miserable the yolk of slavery was. Turner rallied his people who longed for freedom, calling them to arms. It is a chilling how Turner and his band of followers killed 60 slave owners, but understandable when one thinks on the way he and his people were treated. It is a classic history lesson that when an oppressed people have had enough mistreatment they rise up to defend themselves at any cost. The commentary that comes with the movie was also very interesting and worth watching.

~Stunt Clerk #3

Image result for a series of unfortunate events netflix  A Series of Unfortunate Events (Netflix series)

There are eight episodes, which basically covers the first 4 books. The situations are ridiculously melancholy and completely unlikely. Which is kinda the point. I didn’t see the movie version but I did read the books and I think all the actors and crew did a great job.

~Buffy the Netflix Watcher

Staff reads

Looks like this week the library staff watched more than they read. That’s quite all right; we don’t judge. The library is known for having lots of books, but we have lots of other things too. Y’all should come in and check it out. (*librarian humor*)

 

The Secret Life of Pets (dvd)

A faithful companion gets jealous and ugly and inadvertently triggers a day filled with catastrophes. Max finds himself having to share his home and human with another dog named Duke. Duke decides to get back at Max and they both end up fighting for their lives and one disastrous event after another takes place. They also make many new frenemies along the way. At the end they find themselves back home with Katy a little wiser about sharing and accepting change. This is a great movie with a reminder to play nice with everyone.

~Stunt Clerk #3

My Neighbor Seki (manga) *coming soon to DVPL

I’ve only read the first volume, but it’s a silly and fun manga to read. This manga series is about Rumi Yokoi, who in the midst of her normal life as a student, finds herself sitting next to a very interesting “neighbor” in her classroom. The neighbor named Seki is interested in only one thing, building bizarrely elaborate dioramas on his desk. So elaborate in fact, that Yokoi can’t help become interested in what he’s up to. Thus the dilemma begins for young Yokoi, who wants to learn, but can’t help but be impressed at the wacky antics her neighbor Seki is up to. Yokoi becomes so interested in fact, that she manages to get in trouble more than once, while Seki somehow never does. The stories that Seki weaves with his imagination, and a lot of skill, will leave you wanting more.

~Deysi

Outlander (tv series)

Claire Randall is a WW2 nurse who somehow goes back in time to Scotland in 1743. She tries to adapt, survive, and return to her own time. There are many complications along the way: political, emotional, and physical.

Based on the popular Outlander series of books by Diana Gabaldon.

~Buffy the Netflix Watcher

The Wiz (Live)

Starring world-class performers and recording artists including Queen Latifah, Mary J. Blige, David Alan Grier, and Ne-Yo, this is NBC’s musical television production of The Wiz Live! Staying true to the groundbreaking Broadway show that put a vivid urban spin on the land of Oz, get ready for a fresh, eye-popping new trip down the yellow brick road. Winner of seven Tony Awards, including Best Musical, the original hit Broadway show became a cultural touchstone that also spawned the classic film starring Diana Ross and Michael Jackson. Here, a Tony-winning creative team has brought together the imaginative acrobats of Cirque du Soleil and a cast of extraordinary singers and dancers to create an exciting new version of The Wiz unlike anything seen before.

~Candace

Dune by Frank Herbert

I don’t always read fiction, but when I do…it’s usually something that’s been around for a while and most everyone else has already read! This time, it was a 50-year-old classic and winner of the Hugo and Nebula Awards that’s gone on to become one of the best-selling sci-fi works of all time.

One thing that stood out for me about Herbert’s storytelling is that so much of the development takes place in what the characters notice. There’s action in the plot for sure, but it’s both inside and outside the characters’ heads. The Dune universe’s superpower is an ultra-heightened ability to pick up on subtle details, to foresee various possible futures, and to influence others by getting deep inside their psyche…rather like The Force in the Star Wars universe, though the characters don’t have access to full-on telepathy or telekinesis. Mind control in the Dune universe happens in a way that, by comparison, somehow seems more plausible…even more organic than the techniques used in Inception (2010) and the nootropics of Alan Glynn’s The Dark Fields (which was the basis for the 2011 film Limitless).

But what most won me over about this novel—and this is usually where a work of fiction either wins me over or not—is that even though it’s a fictional story, I still walk away from it with some new insight or perspective on the real world and how people interact within it. (As Picasso puts it, “art is a lie that makes us realize truth.”) Fans of Dune who want to dig further into philosophical questions posed by Herbert’s universe may enjoy Dune and Philosophy, edited by Jeffery Nicholas.

-Dennis

Minimalism

This is a documentary that takes a look at how we might live a life with more purpose and less things (or just things that bring us joy). I stumble onto this while looking for inspiration on the internet after reading The life-changing magic of tidying up : the Japanese art of decluttering and organizing by Marie Kondo. The creatures of this film also have a podcast and website called: The Minimalist. I have found these materials to be a helpful in trying to declutter and to really focus on what important to me.

~ Emma

Product Details The Tomorrow People (TV Series)

This show is about people with special powers, and their struggles keep themselves alive. I like this series because it is thought provoking about the subject of if people so different then us (i.e. powers) to they deserve to be treated differently. If you are a fan if the CW shows you might like this series.

~Emma

Staff reads

There are some great fiction and non-fiction books this week. I compile the list every week and I’m going to add some of these titles to my personal TBR (to be read) list.

We’d like to know what y’all are reading too! So, please feel free to let us know in the comments.

 

 Eddie the Eagle (movie)

Inspired by true events, this is a feel-good story about Michael Eddie Edwards, an unlikely but courageous British ski jumper who charmed the world at the 1988 Winter Olympics.

~Danene

 

Invincible (movie)

Based on the story of Vince Papale, a 30-year-old bartender from South Philadelphia who overcame long odds to play for the NFL’s Philadelphia Eagles in 1976.

~Danene

The Highly Sensitive Person by Elaine N. Aron.

This has come recommended by various people, particularly Ann Bogel of Modern Mrs. Darcy. It describes the 15-20% of the population who are more sensitive to external stimuli, take more in, and are more easily overwhelmed by certain environments. I’m pretty sure this is me, so I’m curious to find out what she has to say. (Currently on sale in Kindle form; I got it during a previous Kindle book sale.)

~Hannah

The Martian by Andy Weir

Astronaut Mark Watney makes history when he is left for dead on Mars. The history making part is that he doesn’t die. Instead, he puts his botany and mechanical skills to use and manages to survive; without going crazy.

I’ve actually read this book before. My anti-social side really, really enjoys the idea of being the only person on the planet. (I also recommend the movie.)

~Buffy the Netflix Watcher

HEARTLAND - THE COMPLETE SEASON 1 Heartland (tv series)

Follows a family who own a horse/cattle ranch in Alberta, Canada. The youngest daughter, Amy, has a gift for training and fixing “problem” horses.

My whole family has been watching this show. It’s very wholesome and family friendly without being sugary sweet.

~Buffy the Netflix Watcher

What You Should Know About Politics…But Don’t: A Nonpartisan Guide to the Issues that Matter by Jessamyn Conrad.

Reading this as part of my goal to be a better informed and more engaged citizen. It does appear to be bipartisan, and I am learning a lot I didn’t know about the various big issues. It’s a good starting point.

~Hannah

Ashfall by Mike Mullin

Everything changed when the Fire Nation attacked… or rather, when the Yellowstone supervolcano erupted. Alex’s parents were away when the disaster happened and so he sets out to find them. He struggles to survive the changed weather and the collapse of most of the nation’s infrastructure.

~Buffy the Netflix Watcher

Staff reads

Here’s our first set of recommendations for the brand new year. We’re starting off right with a good mixture of titles. Audiobooks, DVDs, print books, I’m sure you’ll find something that sounds interesting.

We’d like to know what y’all are reading too! So, please feel free to let us know in the comments.

Kubo and the Two Strings (Blu-ray + DVD + Digital HD)

 

Kubo and the Two Strings (DVD)

Clever, kindhearted Kubo makes a humble living, telling stories to the people of his seaside town. Unsure if the stories his mother told him are real or made up, Kubo accidentally summons the evil spirits that have hunted him since his birth. Armed with his magical instrument, Kubo joins forces with Monkey and Beetle. Together they set out on a thrilling quest to save his family and solve the mystery of his fallen father, the greatest samurai warrior the world has ever known. With the help of his samisen – a magical musical instrument – Kubo must battle gods and monsters, including the vengeful Moon King and the evil twin Sisters to unlock the secret of his legacy, reunite his family, and fulfill his heroic destiny.

It’s a beautiful 3D stop-motion film that will warm your heart. I can’t say for sure, but I believe it took them 2 years to make this film. Not only is the art/animation incredible, but the music played by the samisen skillfully harmonizes with the story. It’s a must see for any lover of animated films, art, and the Japanese culture. If you’re interested in seeing some of the stop motion animation, click on the link and get ready to have your mind blown!

~Deysi

 

Zero Waste by Bea Johnson.

This book is about making the conscious decision to cut back on plastic (any type) waste. Came across this as I was doing more research on minimalism after reading Marie Kondo’s book. The thing you might find helpful in this book might not happen overnight, but will take time. I found this book to be insightful about wanting to be a good steward of this one and only earth that we are on. So if you are a “go green” kind of person (or wanting to be a more conscious citizen) you might like this book. You can also look on YouTube and Pinterest for more inspiration.

~Emma

Disney U : how the Disney University develops the world’s most engaged, loyal, and customer-centric employees by Doug Lipp.

The book goes over on how a company might do better customer service the “The Disney Way”. This book is a good read if you are in a job that deals with the public all the time. After reading this book is has inspired me to want to do a better job at customer service here at the library. Some great additional reads that would go along with this book are Creativity, Inc.: overcoming the unseen forces that stand in the way of true inspiration by Edwin E. Catmull and Be Our Guest by Theodore Kinni.

~Emma

  Life, Animated by Ron Suskind

We hear a lot about autism, but I’ve never read a book like this! It’s the inspiring true story of Owen Suskind, a boy with autism, who is totally absorbed by Disney movies. But instead of his fascination keeping him isolated from the outside world, the characters and emotions of the movies, which he knows so well, help Owen – and his family – connect his own inner thoughts and feelings to reality. As readers, we both cry and cheer to watch the very difficult but rewarding journey that Owen, his parents, and his older brother travel together as they learn to deal with his uniqueness. It is an astounding account, detailed so very well by his father, who is a Pulitzer Prize writer. I saw some video clips online of Owen’s story, and a documentary movie by the same title is now also available, so at first I thought the book would seem dry and boring in comparison. Not at all! I would recommend it to anyone who likes to be inspired by courage, commitment, and family.

~Carole

  The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

Do you like science? Do you like biographies? How about investigative reporting? This book is for you! Rebecca Skloot does an amazing job of introducing us to the famous HeLa cells, used in nearly every research lab. But learning about the history of the cells pales in comparison to the mystery involved in tracking down and getting to know about the life and death of Henrietta Lacks, from whom those cells originated. And we are not only become acquainted with, but feel that we get to know her family members, who finally came to trust the writer with their very personal story. In places, I laughed out loud. And sometimes I unashamedly cried. The descriptions of what this poor, black family went through were so vividly drawn, I felt I could see the dusty road and the tumbled-down house.

Listening to the audiobook for me was an enrichment in fully experiencing this story. The different voices of the characters as well as the narration really brought everything to life.

I highly recommend you give this book and audiobook a try!

~Carole

The Longest Walk by George Meegan

George Meegan had a dream of crossing the entire western hemisphere on foot. In 1976, he set out to do just that, walking from Ushuaia, Argentina, to Prudhoe Bay, Alaska. The journey stretched to over 19,000 miles and took him seven years to complete. Along the way he got married, had two children, crossed the all-but-impassable Darien Gap, camped with gauchos, cheated death, met Jimmy Carter and Larry King, and experienced the Americas firsthand in a way that nobody had before and very few have done since. The Longest Walk is his account of the historic journey.

~Dennis

 

Staff reads

This is the last post before we close for Christmas. There are lots of Christmas themed options on the list. We’ve got one book about mountain climbing; it isn’t Christmas themed, but there sure is a lot of snow.

Also here’s a picture from one of our staff members that goes along with one of our recommendations. Can anyone guess which one?

charlie-brown-tree

We’d like to know what y’all are reading too! So, please feel free to let us know in the comments.

 

Terra Nova

Terra Nova (TV Series)

This is about a family going back to the dinosaur age to build a new life. It is full of adventure on how it might like during that time. This is a good watch if you are into Doctor Who type of shows. Saw the trailer to this show several years ago and just watched it recently highly recommend.

~Emma

Frosty the Snowman

 

Frosty the Snowman

Do you remember when the children made a snowman in the schoolyard on Christmas Eve and named him Frosty? Karen placed a top hat on his head and everyone’s favorite snowman magically came to life? Look at Frosty go!

~Candace

Clark the Shark Loves Christmas
Clark the Shark Loves Christmas by Bruce Hale

Clark the Shark loves everything about Christmas, including his class’s Secret Santa celebration.

~Danene

 

 How to Catch Santa by Jean Reagan

After waiting for days and days and days, it’s finally Christmas Eve and two siblings share their clever tips for “catching” Santa!

~Danene

Penguin’s Christmas Wish by Salina Yoon

Penguin can’t wait to celebrate Christmas with his family and friends. But when things don’t go exactly as planned, Penguin learns to find holiday magic in the most unexpected places.

~Danene

The Gingerbread Man Loose at Christmas by Laura Murray

Everyone in class is busy practicing songs and making goodies for their trip to town to thank community helpers, and the Gingerbread Man has made a gift for someone extra sweet.

~Danene

Peak by Roland Smith

This book starts with the main character, Peak, as he’s doing some climbing. What is he climbing? The Woolworth building in New York City. The city government is not very happy about this, or the media attention.

I really enjoyed this story. Peak is 14 and a skilled climber. His father takes him on a mountain climbing trip. I liked the setting and the details about the trek up the mountain.

~Buffy the Netflix Watcher

The Edge by Roland Smith

Peak is back from his trip and gets invited to a super exclusive charity climbing event. He and his mom (also a top-notch climber) are supposed to climb a mountain in the middle east. They’ve barely gotten started when serious trouble befalls some of the other members of the group.

~Buffy the Netflix Watcher

Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer (movie)

Although the other reindeer laugh at him because of his bright red nose, Rudolph proves his worth when he is chosen to lead Santa Claus’ sleigh on a foggy night.

~Candace

A Charlie Brown Christmas (movie)

Christmastime is here. Happiness and cheer. Christmas lights may be twinkling red and green, but Charlie Brown has the Yuletide blues. To get in the holiday spirit, he takes Lucy’s advice and directs the Christmas play. And what’s a Christmas play without a Christmas tree? But everyone makes fun of the short, spindly nevergreen Charlie Brown brings back – until the real meaning of Christmas works its magic. I actually own the Charlie Brown Christmas tree. I think it’s adorable.

~Candace

 

Duncanville Public Library offering Bullet Journaling How-To Class

When: January 28, 2017

Come learn what bullet journaling is and how to incorporate it into your life. Anyone can benefit from this class, including those who are the organized type and those who are not! The class will be taught by the Technical Services Librarian, Hannah Olsen, who keeps the Library staff calendar and schedules on track. The class will be held in the Library Program Room at 3:30 p.m. on January 28th. The Library is located at 201 James Collins Blvd. Duncanville, TX 75116.

 

Staff reads

When we’re not pretending to be mannequins (check out our Facebook page), we like to read and/or watch TV. Here are a few of the things we’ve read and/or watched recently.

We’d like to know what y’all are reading too! So, please feel free to let us know in the comments.

 

Some People, Some Other Place by J. California Cooper

For generations Eula Too’s family has been making a journey North, year after year, step by painful step; and she’s determined to be the one to make it all the way to Chicago. In and out of school, taking care of her fourteen brothers and sisters, she can see no way out. But when a new family burden threatens to overwhelm her, she at last leaves for the city, only to find that her life gets even tougher.

~Candace

 

My Struggle: Book 1 by Karl Ove Knausgaard.

This is the first in a six-volume autobiographical novel which often describes everyday activities in detail. However, the spots where he segues into thinking about the nature of life, the universe, and everything provide beauty which makes it worth it…if you don’t mind slow-paced, meandering novels.

~Hannah

Fool Moon by Jim Butcher (Dresden Files #2)

This is the second of a series my husband loves, but that I haven’t gotten into before. However, book two made things more promising for me. It hinted at some plotlines that progress through the series, as opposed to a series where the books are loosely connected. I’m looking forward to seeing how this series progresses.

~Hannah

 

 Whiskey Tango Foxtrot (movie)

Based on journalist Kim Barker’s memoir, The Taliban Shuffle: Strange Days in Afghanistan and Pakistan, which details her years as a reporter in Pakistan and Afghanistan beginning in 2002.

~Danene

How to a Keep a Boy from Kissing You by Tara Eglington

Sweet sixteen and never been kissed…that’s Aurora Skye’s big secret. She’s not going to give away her first kiss to just anyone. Busy dodging suitors and matchmaking for her best friends, Aurora (not so) patiently awaits her prince.

~Danene

Our Chemical Hearts by Krystal Sutherland

Henry Page has never been in love. He fancies himself a hopeless romantic, but the slo-mo, heart palpitating, can’t-eat-can’t-sleep kind of love that he’s been hoping for just hasn’t been in the cards for him—at least not yet. Instead, he’s been happy to focus on his grades, on getting into a semi-decent college and finally becoming editor of his school newspaper. Then Grace Town walks into his first period class on the third Tuesday of senior year and he knows everything’s about to change.

~Danene

The Complete Practical Encyclopedia of Needlecrafts by Lucinda Ganderton

I enjoy cross-stitch and lately I’ve become fascinated with embroidery. I have an old baby blanket that my grandmother made for me and I’d like to be able to repair some of the stitches.

~Buffy the Netflix Watcher

Staff reads

Sorry for the gap in title posting. That’s what happens when someone goes on vacation. At least it means we’ve got a lot to share with y’all today.

We’d like to know what y’all are reading too! So, please feel free to let us know in the comments.

 

Ruby Red

This movie is based on the same book by Kerstin Gier. I was watching this on a long flight. This adaptation seems to be pretty close to the book. It was an enjoyable movie to watch.

~Emma

 

Nights in Rodanthe by Nicholas Sparks

I like to read Nicholas Sparks now and then when I want a fluff romantic story that I can finish pretty quickly. So a few hours after I started Nights in Rodanthe I thought to myself how typical of Nicolas Sparks to create a beautiful love story out of tragedy and loneliness only to kill off one of the characters and leave me, the reader, without that wished for happy ending. I know, big spoiler right, but if you are a fan of Nicholas Sparks you know what I’m talking about.

~Stunt Clerk #3

5-Minute mug cakes by Jennifer Lee

I have to admit that I did not try a recipe in this book, but not because they looked awful. If I really had a craving for one of the really yummy looking cakes in here I would have made it in a heartbeat…assuming I had the ingredients on hand. I do have a go to mug cake recipe that I almost always have the ingredients for and that is why this book intrigued me. If you have a sweet tooth you will love this book. Another reason to pick up this book the next time you are in the library is that you could easily make a gift out of one of these cakes. Put together the dry ingredients in a baggie. Place that baggie in a neat mug and voila you have a great gift to give this holiday season.

~Stunt Clerk #3

Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life Poster

 

 Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life

I have watched this season twice since it debuted Thanksgiving weekend. If you are a fan of the Gilmore Girls you can understand why. Those fast talking women have so much to say that it is hard to take it all in one sitting. The Gilmore Girls also never fail to entertain with their never ending humor and Gilmore drama. I wish that Melissa McCarthy could have had more screen time, but from what I’ve read it was hard to get her scheduled for that with her other engagements. So other than needing more Sookie in the show it was really good and the ending left you hungry for more of the drama. Especially with the bombshell Rory dropped on Lorelei at the very end!

~Stunt Clerk #3

Product Details Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman! by Richard Feynman

Feynman was not your average physicist, it seems. He won the Nobel Prize, worked on the Manhattan project, and taught at Cornell and Cal Tech…But he also was an artist, a musician, and an accomplished safecracker. He takes us on quite a ride in this book (originally published in 1985), hitting many of the key moments in his professional career as well as moments of hilarious mischief.

~Dennis

Con Academy by Joe Schreiber

Meet Will Shea, a con artist who has bluffed his way into one of the nation’s most exclusive private schools. But Will isn’t the only scammer at Connaughton Academy—Andrea Dufresne is there too, and the ivy-covered campus isn’t big enough for the both of them.

~Danene

Some Writer!: The Story of E. B. White by Melissa Sweet

This is an authorized illustrated biography of author E. B. White and includes an afterword by Martha White, E. B. White’s granddaughter. Sweet mixes White’s personal letters, photos, and family memorabilia with her own artwork to tell his story, from his birth in 1899 to his death in 1985. The beloved author of Charlotte’s Web loved words his whole life.

~Danene

The Hero and the Crown by Robin McKinley

Newbery Medal 1985

Princess Aerin of Damar has always felt like an outsider. When she was a young girl she remembers being told, that her witch mother had died of grief after giving birth to her, a daughter. Knowing this, she had always wanted to prove she was worthy of her position as princess, to the people, to her father, and more importantly to herself. But how would she accomplish this? She stumbles across an old forgotten book in the castle library about dragon slaying. Finding this book is just the beginning; Princess Aerin, along with her trusty steed Talat, journey across the land to fulfill her destiny as savior of her kingdom.

~Deysi

Staff Reads

We’ve got quite a few titles to share with y’all this week. Some we have in the library, some we’ve got on order, and some are only available online.

We’d like to know what y’all are reading too! So, please feel free to let us know in the comments.

Product Details

 

Stitchers (TV Series)

This show is about a girl who is recruited by the government to go into the minds of dead people, to find how they got killed. I watched the trailer for the show and decided it looked cool to watch.

~Emma

 

Booked by Kwame Alexander

Newbery-winning poet Alexander once again brings to life a novel in verse that equally captures the rapid-fire excitement of a soccer match and the palpable pain of a young boy whose family is falling apart. Peppered throughout are useful and amusing vocabulary words as well as wise-cracking yet sage life lessons from a beloved librarian.

~Danene

Saving Red by Sonya Sones

Sones creates a page-turning novel in verse about homelessness, mental illness, and grief. Molly and her service dog, Pixel, meet a homeless girl named Red. Molly makes it her mission to reunite Red with her family for Christmas.

~Danene

 

 Veronica Mars (TV series)

A high-schooler works part-time for her father at his private investigation agency. They’re both determined to find out who killed the daughter of the richest man in town. Veronica is especially determined because the dead girl, Lily, was her best friend.

There are also a couple of mysteries written that follow Veronica’s investigations. They pick up about 10 years after the show originally ended.

~Buffy the Netflix Watcher

Last Holiday (2006) Last Holiday (DVD)

Starring Queen Latifah as Georgia Byrd, a shy New Orleans cookware salesclerk. When her doctor informs her that she has less than a month to live, the news helps her realize it’s time to give her life a serious makeover! Throwing caution to the wind, Georgia jets off on a dream vacation to live life like there’s no tomorrow. A fun, family movie for the holidays, I recommend it to everyone.

~Candace

Loving My Actual Life by Alexandra Kuykendall

A woman takes each month to do things a bit differently day to day, and focuses on all the good things in her actual life. Written from a Christian perspective.

Similar reads (with a secular perspective): The Happiness Project and Happier At Home by Gretchen Rubin

~Hannah

Love the Home You Have by Melissa Michaels

Home design blogger Melissa Michaels focuses in this book not on what you can purchase to add to your home, but rather how you can love the home you have by rethinking your perspective, shifting room functions to better suit your family, decluttering, and decorating creatively. Written with a Christian perspective.

Similar reads (with a more secular perspective): The Nesting Place, by Myquillin Smith.

~Hannah

The Crown Poster The Crown (TV series)

This tells the story of the reigning monarch of England, Elizabeth II. At times the show is a bit slow, but if you love period drama this is a great show to watch.

~Stunt Clerk #3

Product Details The Man in the High Castle (Amazon Prime series)

It is a very interesting take on how the world would be if Nazi Germany had won World War II. I look forward to finding out who the Man in the High Castle is and what he will do with those mysterious films that show the world as it should be.

~Stunt Clerk #3

Staff reads

Here’s this week’s update on what the library staff is reading. There’s a good mix, so maybe you’ll find a title you might be interested in checking out. (Ah, librarian humor. So punny.) We’d like to know what y’all are reading too! So, please feel free to let us know in the comments.

 

Teen Wolf (TV Series)

This show is about werewolves and other supernatural beings. If you like Twilight books you might like this. I finally watched this after hearing so much about it.

~Emma

 

Ada Twist, Scientist by Andrea Beaty

The author Andrea Beaty and Illustrator David Roberts have done it again! In the STEM/STEAM inspired “series” of children’s books, which began with “Iggy Peck, Architect” followed by “Rosie Revere, Engineer”, comes the newest addition “Ada Twist, Scientist”. We return to Lila Greer’s classroom (featured in the past two books), and are introduced to Ada Twist who is a very curious young girl who seeks answers to understand her world. As any good scientist should, she seeks knowledge through questions, experiments, and more questions.

I honestly hope the author continues to write about all the children in Lila Greer’s Classroom!

They’re the bees’ knees!

~Deysi

WEST WING COMPLETE 1ST SEASON The West Wing (TV series)

Follows the work lives of several White House staffers who work directly with the President.

For some reason, I’m on a bit of a political kick lately. Must be something in the air.

~Buffy the Netflix Watcher

 

 House of Cards (TV series)

Watching Frank Underwood’s political machinations never gets old, though I really hope our actual political environment is less opportunistic.

~Hannah

Chance on lovin’ you by Eboni Snoe

Sasha Townsend always plays it safe—in life and in love—until an unexpected inheritance brings her to the lushly tropical Florida Keys. There, beneath the hot sun of Magic Key, she begins to relax and renew…until she’s summoned to the neighboring estate by its enigmatic owner, Cay Ellis. The handsome millionaire’s highhanded ways and infuriating demands awaken Sasha to emotions and a world available only in her imagination.

~Candace

A Million Years in a Day: A Curious History of Everyday Life from the Stone Age to the Phone Age
 A Million Years In A Day by Greg Jenner

https://books.google.com/books?id=7AcmCwAAQBAJ

As much as we may enjoy the perks and conveniences of life in the 21st century, you might be surprised at just how long some of our “modern” tools and practices have been around. To name a few, dentistry dates back to about 9,000 years ago, beds to as much as 77,000 years ago, and knives to about 1.6 million years ago! In this book, Jenner walks us through the course of a normal Saturday, presenting a long-view historical perspective on many of the habits and customs we take for granted…such as how we measure and track time, where we get our calories, how we handle hygiene and waste management, how we shield ourselves from the elements with clothing and dwellings, how we also use these for outward expression of ourselves, and how we bond collectively through social activities. “Had we been joined today by our stone-age ancestors…they would have recognized almost every one of our daily rituals.”

~Dennis