Congratulations to the 2019 Leadership Academy Graduates

Congratulations to the 2019 Duncanville Leadership Academy graduates! Fourteen Duncanville city employees from various departments graduated from the City’s annual Leadership Academy on Wednesday, December 11, 2019. The purpose of the Leadership Academy is to recognize and develop upcoming leaders amongst the staff who exhibit qualities of integrity, accountability, empathy, humility, resilience, vision, influence and positivity.

2019 Duncnaville Leadership Academy Graduates

Members of the 2019 Duncanville Leadership Academy

  • Esther Wright, Senior Code Enforcement Officer
  • Jose Torres, Crew Leader Streets
  • Stephanie Lott, Librarian
  • Duaine Mayo, Police Officer
  • Christopher McCaleb, Police Lieutenant
  • Ronald Wilcots, Police Lieutenant
  • Richard Jones, Fieldhouse Operations Supervisor
  • Derrick Downs, Crew Leader Utility Billing
  • Daisy Guillen, Court Clerk
  • Mike Forester, Crew Leader, Irrigation
  • David Dunn, Assistant Utilities Operations Manager
  • Angelica Garcia, Building Inspections Coordinator
  • Ervey Morales – Skilled Maintenance Worker Parks
  • Jimmy Shelley – Maintenance Worker Streets

The Leadership Academy is a one-year program that meets monthly for leadership training, which also includes city-related topics such as Introduction to City Values and Culture, Community Engagement, Council Relations, Strategic Planning, etc. Midway through the program, academy members divide into three groups and select a city-related project they are responsible for researching, developing, and implementing. The group projects for the 2019 academy program include:

  1. City University – Establish and implement a city-wide training and development program for employees
  2. Senior Center Expansion – Research and recommend expanded programs/services for the Duncanville D.L. Hopkins Jr. Senior Center
  3. Employee “Walk In Your Shoes” Day – Create a program where employees rotate through departments/divisions to learn/observe what each department does in the city

Library Announces 2019 Summer Reading Club Winners

Duncanville Public Library Summer Reading Club participants Aliyah Jones, Jacqueline Solis, Jaedon Wilhite, and Abigail Sanchez are the grand prize winners of Kindle Fire tablets, courtesy of The Friends of the Duncanville Public Library.

All the winners, Aliyah, 6, Jacqueline, 9, Jaedon, 14, and Abigail, 15, reside in Duncanville. Kids and teens who completed the 20-hour reading log were entered in the grand prize drawing. The four winners were randomly selected out of 702 kids and teens who completed reading logs this summer.

A Universe of Stories was this year’s Summer Reading Club theme, and the library offered 75 free programs. Each year, the Duncanville Public Library hosts the summer reading club to provide incentives to encourage kids and teens to read over the summer. Studies show participation in summer reading programs enables children to maintain essential reading skills during their summer vacation. And, as a result, they are better prepared for the upcoming school year.

For more information about the library and its programs, visit www.duncanville.com/library or call 972-780-5050.

                    

Duncanville Public Library Upgrades Online Interface

On Monday May 6, 2019 the Duncanville Public Library is switching over to a new Integrated Library System that will provide a robust, user-friendly online experience for patrons. The web-based software manages the library catalog, circulation, patron accounts, library materials cataloging and records management. Not only will users benefit from the latest library technology, but it also improves back end functionality to make facilitation of library services more efficient and streamlined. Patron accounts will feature automatic renewals, push notifications with reminders and the ability to search the e-books catalog.

Below are a few of the new features patrons can expect:

  • Automated renewals
  • Text notifications
  • Option to receive notifications in English or Spanish
  • Suggest books through the catalog and get staff responses
  • Browse the displays from home
  • Browse the items in the New area from home
  • Parents can view their children’s checkouts without having to log in separately
  • Make your own lists and view staff-created lists
  • Get notified when it’s almost time to renew your card
  • If Overdrive has items that fit your search, you’ll see that at the top of the page
  • “Did you mean” feature in search results
  • Limit search to currently available items
  • View – and clear – your PAC search history (only when logged into your own account)
  • If you typically only use e-resources, that activity will  be recognized in the Integrated Library System so that we know you’re an active patron
  • Staff have a lot more options for customization and making things work better

Visit the Duncanville Public Library!

People of Duncanville mini-interview

Sulema L.

  • What is your name and what do you do?  My name is Ms. Sulema Lira and I have been a bilingual elementary teacher in Duncanville for 5 years.
  • What’s your favorite free-time activity? Taking my son and daughter to the Duncanville city parks.
  • What’s something you’re proud of that others might not know about? (e.g. accomplishment, experience, skill) I’m proud of all of my accomplishments in life: graduating college, my 10 year experience in business, my 5 year experience in finance, and my 5 year experience as a bilingual elementary teacher. But most of all, I am proud of my children and the home I have built for them here in Duncanville.
  • How long have you lived in Duncanville? I have been a part of the Duncanville community for 8 years due to employment,  but I officially moved here last June.
  • What’s your favorite part of living here? The small town feel in a large metroplex. Also, the school district is pretty great.
  • What’s something that could be improved? Red Bird Mall could use a makeover.
  • What’s a favorite memory of Duncanville that you have? My favorite memory is teaching kindergarten as my son started kindergarten at Fairmeadows Elementary.  Another favorite memory is bowling at Red Bird Bowling Lanes with my family and friends.

Introducing Notary Services

Beginning on November 1, 2017 the Library will begin offering notary services. These services are low cost (only $1) and are open to all. You do not have to be a resident of Duncanville or a member of the Library in order to use the notary service.

F.A.Q.

  • Patrons must present their photo ID (issued by a governmental agency or a passport issued by the United States)
  • Documents presented must include the Notarial Certificate. Duncanville Library Staff will not print out or offer advice concerning Notarial Certificates
  • Patron must bring along a witness if needed. Library staff or other patrons cannot be solicited for transactions.
  • Documents to be notarized must be in English
  • Notaries may not notarize public record documents or photocopies of public record documents
  • Bring the document in its entirety with you to your appointment
  • There is a $1 fee per signature
  • Cash or check only payable at time of service
  • No Refunds
  • Notary may not complete an I-9 form.
  • Services are limited to Acknowledgments only.
  • Service not available on Mondays.

 

Sweep It Out Saturday

Sweep It Out Saturday is scheduled for October 7, 2017, from 8 am to 1 pm down James Collins Boulevard. Bring your paper for shredding, old electronics to be recycled, donations for Goodwill, bulky trash and brush for the dumpsters or volunteer to help clean up litter.

This event is made possible through partnerships with Goodwill, Keep Duncanville Beautiful, DFW Reclaimers and Republic Services.

Click here for the flyer

People of Duncanville

Mary Ann’s Duncanville Memories:

“When my husband began applying for promotions in 1984, I didn’t think much of it. Minot, ND? Yikes. Too cold. Baltimore? Too crowded. When one came through in Dallas, I felt weak. I loved my house and my job. My mother lived a few blocks away (read: babysitting). I played flute and piccolo in the local symphony. But I did what people do and said yes. (Babysitting grandmother was able to go on without us, luckily.) We looked everywhere for a house. Highland Park was nice, but oh my. Finally, driving across the bridge over I-20 on Camp Wisdom, I felt at peace. The schools were good, the people friendly, the commute to downtown Dallas reasonable. My husband thrived. My job let me transfer. No symphony job, but they do let me buy a ticket. I still love it here – it’s a beautiful little city that’s well maintained and has great people. I’m planning to stay!”

People of Duncanville interview

  • What is your name and what do you do?
    • My name is Raymoondo Juan Kwatoko Lee. I’m an aspiring motivational speaker and clothing line creator (“MOONDOWEAR”).
  • What’s something you’re proud of that others might not know about?
    • I’m a great communicator with a gift to inspire others to be their best! I’m actually funny too, a lot of people don’t know that about me. My nonprofit, Warriors-Hope & Compassion, hosted a Humanitarian Mission for the Duncanville Police Dept. Jan. 27, 2017.
  • How long have you lived in Duncanville?
    • I’ve lived in Duncanville for 2 years in June.
  • What’s your favorite part of living here?
    • I love the quiet streets, nice neighbors, and the great parks.
  • What’s something that could be improved?
    • We need more police patrols, major department stores nearby, and community activities. More minority representation on the City Council and other civil departments. Lower rental payments on commercial buildings. A Homeless Outreach Mission.
  • What’s a favorite memory of Duncanville that you have?
    • My favorite memory is seeing the faces of appreciation from the Duncanville Police Officers and Chief Robert Brown at the “Thank U 4 Your Service Humanitarian Event” in Jan. 2017. Shaking their hands and telling them how much we appreciate their service to the great Duncanville Community.

Bryant C.

He was four and his sister Glenna was two when his family moved to “the old Pickard place,” just south of Duncanville and outside the Duncanville city limits. It took a while for the adults to make the house livable.  The old farmhouse into which they moved was built in the late 1800s and had no water, electricity, or plumbing.  The wind blew so hard through the cracks in the wooden-plank walls that it blew the newly installed wallpaper off the walls before it could stick.  Bryant remembers sitting under a big pecan tree watching the well being dug and eating a boiled egg.  That big pecan tree and old well are still there, on Main Street across from the Fire Station.

There were fewer than 1000 people living in Duncanville in 1950, and farms were more common than not. Bryant would go with his father to the Duncanville Feed Store, where I.T. Cawthon would sit and talk with old man Will Daniels by the potbellied stove, drinking coffee, before conducting their business.   Although Duncanville had a post office in the middle of downtown, it did not deliver outside of the Duncanville city limits, so the Cawthons received their mail on a rural route out of the Cedar Hill Post Office.

They lived up on a hill overlooking South Main Street. Local boys would race between the two bridges on South Main Street at night, because the bridges were just about a quarter-mile apart. The Blue Hole was between the Cawthon land and the Giles land; part of Ten Mile Creek, it was shale and rock, with many ledges under which pyrite could be found. Boys would go there and skinny dip; when the Cawthon family went as a group, I.T. would go ahead of them and run the boys off.

I.T.’s “real job” was working for Western Electric, which handled phone equipment. In 1960, The Company (based in New York City) sent a writer and photographer from New York to the Cawthon Farm for a Company Magazine article on him entitled “The Smallest Ranch in Texas.”

Bryant started first grade in 1953 at Central Elementary, in one of the last years in which all 12 grades were housed there. The school playground backed up to the Duncanville Air Force Base, and sometimes a ball would get kicked over the fence; the boys then had to go all the way around the base to the entrance (on Main Street) and ask armed MP guards for permission to retrieve the ball. Bryant was part of the last class (1965) to graduate from the Old Duncanville High School (now Reed).

In 1962, the Cawthons sold the farm to a close friend and local developer, Larry Ground. He sold the Old Pickard House and it was relocated to another place in Duncanville, where it is still a residence today. The farm was developed  into Dannybrook Estates, named after Larry’s oldest son, Danny.  The streets were named for his other children:  Linda, Sharon, Larry and Timothy. I.T. Cawthon kept 3 acres at South Main and Danieldale, and built a house at 1443 South Main for his family. Several years later this house became Hanging Gardens, which was demolished (by court order) in January.

I.T. Cawthon served as the Duncanville Mayor from 1966 to 1969 and was a City Councilman from 1962 to 1965.