Governor Abbott Establishes Statewide Face Covering Requirement, Issues Proclamation To Limit Gatherings

Governor Greg Abbott today issued an Executive Order requiring all Texans to wear a face covering over the nose and mouth in public spaces in counties with 20 or more positive COVID-19 cases, with few exceptions. The Governor also issued a proclamation giving mayors and county judges the ability to impose restrictions on some outdoor gatherings of over 10 people, and making it mandatory that, with certain exceptions, people cannot be in groups larger than ten and must maintain six feet of social distancing from others. 

“Wearing a face covering in public is proven to be one of the most effective ways we have to slow the spread of COVID-19,” said Governor Abbott. “We have the ability to keep businesses open and move our economy forward so that Texans can continue to earn a paycheck, but it requires each of us to do our part to protect one another—and that means wearing a face covering in public spaces. Likewise, large gatherings are a clear contributor to the rise in COVID-19 cases. Restricting the size of groups gatherings will strengthen Texas’ ability to corral this virus and keep Texans safe. We all have a responsibility to slow the spread of COVID-19 and keep our communities safe. If Texans commit to wearing face coverings in public spaces and follow the best health and safety practices, we can both slow the spread of COVID-19 and keep Texas open for business. I urge all Texans to wear a face covering in public, not just for their own health, but for the health of their families, friends, and for all our fellow Texans.”


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 708 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

DALLAS — As of 11:00am July 2, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 708 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total case count in Dallas County to 22,590, including 387 deaths.

The additional 7 deaths being reported today include:

  • A man in his 40’s who was a resident of the City of Irving. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Irving. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been hospitalized.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 90’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.

An increasing proportion of COVID-19 cases in Dallas County are being diagnosed in young adults between 18 to 39 years of age, such that of all cases reported after June 1st, more than half have been in this age group. Over 54 confirmed COVID-19 cases in children and staff have been reported from 26 separate daycares in Dallas County since June 1st, including one staff member requiring ICU hospitalization. Increasing reports of cases are continuing to be associated with multiple large recreational and social gatherings since the beginning of June, including house parties. Of cases requiring hospitalization, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age, and about half do not have any high-risk chronic health conditions. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 increased to 26.9% of symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals in week 25. The age-adjusted rates of confirmed COVID-19 cases in non-hospitalized patients have been highest among Hispanics (667.4 per 100,000), Asians (187.4 per 100,000) and Blacks (136.4 per 100,000). These rates have been higher than Whites (43.8 per 100,000). Over 60% of overall COVID-19 cases to date have been Hispanic. Of cases requiring hospitalization who reported employment, over 80% have been critical infrastructure workers, with a broad range of affected occupational sectors, including: healthcare, transportation, food and agriculture, public works, finance, communications, clergy, first responders, and other essential functions.

Of the 387 total deaths reported to date, over a third have been associated with long-term care facilities. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. We continue to see record-high numbers of COVID-19 inpatients in Dallas County hospitals with 669 COVID-19 patients in acute care for the period ending Wednesday, July 1. Additionally, the number of emergency room visits for COVID-19 like symptoms in Dallas County continues to be high with 804 emergency room visits in the 24 hour period ending Wednesday, July 1, which represents 34 percent of all emergency department visits in Dallas County according to information reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council. These numbers not only reflect the impact on our health care facilities, but the danger this virus poses to individuals as increasing numbers of people are ending up in the hospital in need of care. You can find additional information on risk-level monitoring data here.

“Today we reached 700 new COVID-19 cases for the first time and 387 total deaths. It took 92 days to reach 300 COVID-19 cases and it has taken 22 days since then to reach 700. The situation we have right now is significant and accelerating community spread. We cannot afford another statewide letdown in our strong personal responsibility COVID-19 protection choices, so this 4th of July, celebrate with your nuclear family and avoid crowds and extended family gatherings. I realize this is disappointing for all of us but it’s up to all of us to #FlattenTheCurve and save lives, and the best way to do that is to avoid those crowds this holiday weekend and wear a mask if you are around anyone outside your family,” said Dallas County Judge Clay
Jenkins.


Dallas County Health and Human Services
2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID‐19) Summary for June 30, 2020

All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 544 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

DALLAS — As of 11:00am July 1, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 544 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total case count in Dallas County to 21,882, including 380 deaths.

The additional 7 deaths being reported today include:

  • A woman in her 20’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 40’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been hospitalized and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She was found deceased at home and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of DeSoto. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Seagoville. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.

An increasing proportion of COVID-19 cases in Dallas County are being diagnosed in young adults between 18 to 39 years of age, such that of all cases reported after June 1st, more than half have been in this age group. Over 54 confirmed COVID-19 cases in children and staff have been reported from 26 separate daycares in Dallas County since June 1st, including one staff member requiring ICU hospitalization. Increasing reports of cases are continuing to be associated with multiple large recreational and social gatherings since the beginning of June, including house parties. Of cases requiring hospitalization, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age, and about half do not have any high-risk chronic health conditions. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 increased to 26.9% of symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals in week 25. The age-adjusted rates of confirmed COVID-19 cases in non-hospitalized patients have been highest among Hispanics (667.4 per 100,000), Asians (187.4 per 100,000), and Blacks (136.4 per 100,000). These rates have been higher than Whites (43.8 per 100,000). Over 60% of overall COVID-19 cases to date have been Hispanic. Of cases requiring hospitalization who reported employment, over 80% have been critical infrastructure workers, with a broad range of affected occupational sectors, including healthcare, transportation, food and agriculture, public works, finance, communications, clergy, first responders, and other essential functions.

Of the 380 total deaths reported to date, over a third have been associated with long-term care facilities. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. We continue to see high numbers of COVID-19 inpatients in Dallas County hospitals with 532 COVID-19 patients in acute care for the period ending Tuesday, June 30. These numbers appear to be substantially lower due to an issue related to reporting and unfortunately, will likely increase once the number of reporting facilities returns to normal. Additionally, the number of emergency room visits for COVID-19 like symptoms in Dallas County continues to be high with 691 emergency room visits in the 24 hour period ending Tuesday, June 30, which represents 34 percent of all emergency department visits in Dallas County according to information reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council. These numbers not only reflect the impact on our health care facilities, but the danger this virus poses to individuals as increasing numbers of people are ending up in the hospital in need of care. You can find additional information on risk-level monitoring data here.

“Today’s seven deaths include a woman in her 20’s and a man in his 50’s with no underlying health conditions, a somber reminder of the dangerous nature of COVID-19 on everyone. Many people are making plans for the 4th of July weekend. We cannot afford another deviation from making good decisions like we saw during Easter/Passover and Memorial Day given the surge in cases we are now seeing.

It was nearly two months from the time I declared a state of emergency and instituted ‘Safer at Home,’ until the daily case numbers began to go down. It was over five weeks from the time the Governor stopped ‘Safer at Home,’ removed requirements, and began opening many more businesses before we began to see a large surge in cases. The only time we’ve seen huge change happen in less than a month has been the increase in the number of cases we saw two weeks after Easter/Passover and two weeks after Memorial Day. That must not happen for this weekend. If it does, our hospitals are at risk of being overrun later, many more people will get sick and die, and our economy will be set back for months.

Please celebrate the 4th of July with your families and only be around people that you are in close contact with daily. When you are around people other than your family, please wear a mask and keep six foot distance at all times. It’s going to be up to all of us to have a safer 4th of July weekend than we achieved together as a community for Easter/Passover and Memorial Day. Lives depend on it.

I need you, your family needs you, and your community needs you to make strong choices. If you lead a family, please ensure that everyone in your family practices a safe 4th of July by being around only those people you are in close contact with daily and wearing a mask and maintaining six foot distancing. Our Public Health Authority emphasizes that indoor gatherings should be limited to no more than 10 persons, and it is strongly encouraged that these groups be limited to close household members. At all times, please ensure everyone wears a mask and keeps six foot distancing. It’s up to all of us #FlattenTheCurve and the best way to do that is to #StayHomeStaySafe and #WearAMask,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.


Dallas County Health and Human Services
2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID‐19) Summary for June 30, 2020

All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 601 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

DALLAS — As of 11:00 am June 30, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 601 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total case count in Dallas County to 21,338, including 373 deaths.

The additional 20 deaths being reported today include:

  • A man in his 30’s who was a resident of the City of Richardson. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 30’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He was found deceased at home and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 40’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 40’s who was a resident of the City of Irving. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 40’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He expired in an area hospital ED and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Balch Springs. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Seagoville. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 60’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Garland. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He expired in an area hospital ED and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He expired in an area hospital ED and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. She was found deceased at home and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He expired in an area hospital ED and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions
  • A woman in her 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 90’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. She had been hospitalized and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 90’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.

An increasing proportion of COVID-19 cases in Dallas County are being diagnosed in young adults between 18 to 39 years of age, such that of all cases reported after June 1st, more than half have been in this age group. Increasing reports of cases are continuing to be associated with multiple large recreational and social gatherings since the beginning of June, including house parties. Of cases requiring hospitalization, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age, and about half do not have any high-risk chronic health conditions. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 increased to 26.9% of symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals in week 25. The age-adjusted rates of confirmed COVID-19 cases in non-hospitalized patients have been highest among Hispanics (667.4 per 100,000), Asians (187.4 per 100,000), and Blacks (136.4 per 100,000). These rates have been higher than Whites (43.8 per 100,000). Over 60% of overall COVID-19 cases to date have been Hispanic. Of cases requiring hospitalization who reported employment, over 80% have been critical infrastructure workers, with a broad range of affected occupational sectors, including healthcare, transportation, food and agriculture, public works, finance, communications, clergy, first responders, and other essential functions.

Of the 373 total deaths reported to date, over a third have been associated with long-term care facilities. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and
Fridays. Tuesday’s summary is attached.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. We continue to see record-high numbers of COVID-19 inpatients in Dallas County hospitals with 619 COVID-19 patients in acute care for the period ending Monday, June 29. Additionally, the number of emergency room visits for COVID-19 like symptoms in Dallas County continues to be high with 634 emergency room visits in the 24 hour period ending Monday, June 29, which represents 32 percent of all emergency department visits in Dallas County according to information reported to the North Central
Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council. These numbers not only reflect the impact on our health care facilities, but the danger this virus poses to individuals as increasing numbers of people are ending up in the hospital in need of care. You can find additional information on risk-level monitoring data here.

“Today we’ve surpassed 600 new cases of COVID-19 for the first time, having surpassed 300 cases only 20 days ago. Additionally, this is our deadliest day thus far in the outbreak. Twenty residents are being reported as COVID-19 casualties today, exceeding our previous high of 16 deaths. Finally, our hospitalization numbers continue to increase. Local COVID-19 hospitalizations yesterday were at an all-time high of 619 compared to 296 30 days ago. And regionally, yesterday was an all-time high of 1340 compared to 615 30 days ago.

The time for decisive action was several weeks ago but we must move immediately to a statewide masking order. Goldman Sachs estimates that a national masking order would save the economy a trillion dollars.
When you divide that by the population of Texas, we can save $87 billion dollars to our economy, and countless lives by all wearing a mask. We need this to be a statewide requirement and I am again calling on Governor Abbott to make masks the law throughout Texas.

“Similarly, the doctors are strongly recommending that indoor crowds be kept to 10 or less people and that we close bowling alleys, arcades, concerts, movie theaters, gyms (to include yoga and spin studios, etc.), group youth sports, public pools, day camps, and other social venues or activities that do not allow strict physical distancing or masks to be worn 100 percent of the time. Under the doctors’ recommendations, take-out, delivery, and patio dining with strict distancing would still be allowed but they are requesting indoor restaurant dining to be suspended for the time being. These are small prices to pay to save lives and keep our economy going.

“Lives depend on swift action, not only from our state leaders, but from all of you in making good, strong decisions. Please wear a mask whenever you are around others outside your home, avoid unnecessary trips because we know that #StayHomeSavesLives, maintain six foot distancing, and use good hygiene at all times. The 4th of July is quickly approaching, and with it, an opportunity for us to let our guard down again and exacerbate what is already a quickly worsening problem. We can’t let that happen. Together we can defeat COVID-19, but it takes all of us working together and protecting one another as we protect ourselves,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.


Dallas County Health and Human Services
2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID‐19) Summary for June 30, 2020

All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 572 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

As of 11:00 am June 29, 2020, DCHHS is reporting 572 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total case count in Dallas County to 20,737, including 353 deaths. 

The additional death being reported today is of a man in his 40’s who was a resident of Irving. He had not been critically ill nor was he admitted to an area hospital, but he did have underlying high-risk health conditions.

An increasing proportion of COVID-19 cases in Dallas County are being diagnosed in young adults between 18 to 39 years of age, such that of all cases reported after June 1st, more than half have been in this age group.

Increasing reports of cases are continuing to be associated with multiple large recreational and social gatherings since the beginning of June, including house parties.

Of cases requiring hospitalization, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age, and about half do not have any high-risk chronic health conditions. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 increased to 26.9% of symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals in week 25.

The age-adjusted rates of confirmed COVID-19 cases in non-hospitalized patients have been highest among Hispanics (667.4 per 100,000), Asians (187.4 per 100,000) and Blacks (136.4 per 100,000). These rates have been higher than Whites (43.8 per 100,000).   Over 60% of overall COVID-19 cases to date have been Hispanic.

Of cases requiring hospitalization who reported employment, over 80% have been critical infrastructure workers, with a broad range of affected occupational sectors, including: healthcare, transportation, food and agriculture, public works, finance, communications, clergy, first responders and other essential functions.

Of the 353 total deaths reported to date, over a third have been associated with long-term care facilities.

New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays.


Dallas County Health and Human Services
2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID‐19) Summary for June 26, 2020

All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 570 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

DALLAS — As of 11:00 am June 28, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 570 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) and one death bringing the total case count in Dallas County to 20,165, including 352 deaths.

The additional death being reported today is of a man in his 80’s who was a resident of the City of Irving. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.

  • An increasing proportion of COVID-19 cases in Dallas County are being diagnosed in young adults between 18 to 39 years of age, such that of all cases reported after June 1st, more than half have been in this age group.
  • Increasing reports of cases are continuing to be associated with multiple large recreational and social gatherings since the beginning of June, including house parties.
  • Of cases requiring hospitalization, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age, and about half do not have any high-risk chronic health conditions. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19.
  • The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 increased to 26.9% of symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals in week 25.
  • The age-adjusted rates of confirmed COVID-19 cases in non-hospitalized patients have been highest among Hispanics (667.4 per 100,000), Asians (187.4 per 100,000), and Blacks (136.4 per 100,000). These rates have been higher than Whites (43.8 per 100,000). Over 60% of overall COVID-19 cases to date have been Hispanic.
  • Of cases requiring hospitalization who reported employment, over 80% have been critical infrastructure workers, with a broad range of affected occupational sectors, including healthcare, transportation, food and agriculture, public works, finance, communications, clergy, first responders, and other essential functions.
  • Of the 352 total deaths reported to date, over a third have been associated with long-term care facilities.
  • New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. We continue to see record-high numbers of COVID-19 inpatients in Dallas County hospitals with 571 COVID-19 patients in hospitals for the period ending Friday, June 26. Additionally, the number of emergency room visits for COVID-19 like symptoms in Dallas County continues to be high with 694 emergency room visits in the 24-hour period ending Friday, June 25, which represents 29 percent of all emergency department visits in Dallas County according to information reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council. These numbers reflect an ongoing increase and impact on our acute care facilities. You can find additional information on risk-level monitoring data here.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. Due to weekend reporting, new data will be available on Tuesday, June 30, 2020. You can find additional information on risk-level monitoring data here.

“Today is the first day of a new week and we start with a new record of 570 COVID-19 positive cases. The more important number is hospitalizations, which has doubled this month and is the best indicator of the wide community spread we are experiencing. Attached is a letter that I sent to the Governor with recommendations from our most knowledgeable local health experts asking him to take action to control the spread here. Please do not wait for these actions to take place. Read the letter and act as if they have taken place in conducting your own affairs. Do not go to the type of establishments that our public health doctors are saying are unsafe. Stay at home except for essential business trips and wear a mask when outside the home and around other people,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.


Dallas County Health and Human Services
2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID‐19) Summary for June 26, 2020

All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 561 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

DALLAS — As of 11:00 am June 27, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 561 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) and 7 deaths, bringing the total case count in Dallas County to 19,595, including 351 deaths.

The additional 7 deaths being reported today include:

  • A man in his 40’s who was a resident of the City of Irving. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 70’s who was a resident of the City of Farmers Branch. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Irving. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 90’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Seagoville. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. We continue to see record-high numbers of COVID-19 inpatients in Dallas County hospitals with 571 COVID-19 patients in hospitals for the period ending Friday, June 26. Additionally, the number of emergency room visits for COVID-19 like symptoms in Dallas County continues to be high with 694 emergency room visits in the 24-hour period ending Friday, June 25, which represents 29 percent of all emergency department visits in Dallas County according to information reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council. These numbers reflect an ongoing increase and impact on our acute care facilities. You can find additional information on risk-level monitoring data here.

“Today marks the highest amount of new cases that we have seen at 561 and ends our highest weekly average of new cases at 451 up from last week’s average of 358. We have 38 deaths this week. More importantly, we are at a record high for COVID-19 positives having doubled the amount of Dallas County residents in the hospital with COVID-19 during the month of June.

I am calling on the Governor to enact a statewide or at least regional masking law, reinstitute ‘Safer at Home’ for a period of 30 days, and close certain indoor businesses where masks cannot be worn 100 percent of the time. Further, in-restaurant dining should be discouraged. If you must eat at a restaurant, please eat on the patio, but health professionals recommend take out or delivery services during this time of the surge.

It is imperative that we all wear our masks outside of our homes and around other people. It’s up to all of us to flatten the curve and the best way to do that is to #wearamask and #stayhomesavelives,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.


Dallas County Health and Human Services
2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID‐19) Summary for June 26, 2020

All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Duncanville Mayor Barry L. Gordon Amends Emergency Declaration Making Face Coverings Mandatory

DUNCANVILLE – Mayor Barry L. Gordon, in an effort to slow the spread of the 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), has issued a supplement to the city’s Shelter in Place order. This decision comes in response to the growing number of positive COVID-19 cases across Dallas County.

The supplemental order includes:

  • All businesses must implement a health and safety policy. That health and safety policy must require, at a minimum, that all employees and visitors wear face coverings.
  • All people ages ten and above are required to wear face coverings that cover nose and mouth when in public.


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Dallas County Reports 496 Additional Positive 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) Cases

DALLAS — As of 11:00 am June 26, 2020, Dallas County Health and Human Services is reporting 496 additional positive cases of 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19), bringing the total case count in Dallas County to 19,034, including 344 deaths.

The additional 10 deaths being reported today include:

  • A man in his 50’s who was a resident of the City of Irving. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 50’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. She had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Irving. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Mesquite. He had been hospitalized.
  • A man in his 60’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He was found deceased at home and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 70’s who was a resident of the City of Garland. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A woman in her 80’s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in the City of Duncanville. She had been hospitalized and had underlying high-risk health conditions.
  • A man in his 80’s who was a resident of the City of Farmers Branch. He had been critically ill in an area hospital and did not have underlying high-risk health conditions.

An increasing proportion of COVID-19 cases in Dallas County are being diagnosed in young adults between 18 to 39 years of age, such that of all cases reported after June 1st, more than half have been in this age group. Over 31 confirmed COVID-19 cases in children and staff have been reported from 18 separate childcare facilities in Dallas County since June 1st, with additional reports of associated illnesses in family members of affected children. Increasing outbreaks of cases are continuing to be reported from multiple large social gatherings since the beginning of June.

Of cases requiring hospitalization, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age, and about half do not have any high-risk chronic health conditions. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health
condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19. The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 increased to 26.9% at area hospitals in week 25.

The age-adjusted rates of confirmed COVID-19 cases in non-hospitalized patients have been highest among Hispanics (667.4 per 100,000), Asians (187.4 per 100,000), and Blacks (136.4 per 100,000). These rates have been higher than Whites (43.8 per 100,000). Over 60% of overall COVID-19 cases to date have been Hispanic. Of cases requiring hospitalization who reported employment, over 80% have been critical infrastructure workers, with a broad range of affected occupational sectors, including healthcare,
transportation, food and agriculture, public works, finance, communications, clergy, first responders, and other essential functions.

Of the 344 total deaths reported to date, over a third have been associated with long-term care facilities. New cases are being reported as a daily aggregate, with a more detailed summary report updated Tuesdays and Fridays. Friday’s summary report is attached.

Local health experts use hospitalizations, ICU admissions, and ER visits as three of the key indicators in determining the COVID-19 Risk Level (color-coded risk) and corresponding guidelines for activities during our COVID-19 response. We continue to see high numbers of COVID-19 inpatients in Dallas
County hospitals with 534 COVID-19 patients in hospitals for the period ending Thursday, June 25. Additionally, the number of emergency room visits for COVID-19 like symptoms in Dallas County continues to be high with 627 emergency room visits in the 24-hour period ending Thursday, June 25, which represents over 28 percent of all emergency department visits in Dallas County according to information reported to the North Central Texas Trauma Regional Advisory Council. These numbers reflect an ongoing increase and impact on our acute care facilities. You can find additional information on risk-level monitoring data here.

“Today we’ve seen our highest number of COVID-19 cases thus far at 496 cases. We’re also announcing ten more deaths bringing the total up to 344 deaths. I’m pleased that the Governor agreed with local leaders and healthcare leaders to close bars and issue some common-sense requirements at the state level to curb crowd size and help slow the progression. In order to have our best chance to slow the second wave, much more is needed at the state level, including the restoration of the powers of local leaders that were taken on May 1st.

Each of us has an important role to play. Wear your mask whenever outside your home and whenever within six feet of people outside your home. Avoid crowds and go only to places where masks can be worn 100% of the time. If the establishment you’re going to is a place where it is not possible to wear the mask 100% of the time, such as a restaurant, choose the take-out option during this time of increasing spread. Wash your hands frequently, take hand sanitizer for those times when you don’t have access to soap and water, and keep at least a six-foot distance from people when out exercising.

It’s up to all of us to #FlattenTheCurve and we are seeing higher and higher numbers of both hospitalizations for COVID-19 and new cases for COVID-19, and without everyone’s help, we cannot win this battle. All of us must make good smart decisions, which include exercising self-care, not panicking but taking this very seriously, and keeping your and your family’s health at the top of your mind. I need you to show grace to one another, show grace to yourself, practice good self-care and stay in the fight because this is an increasingly urgent situation that will require good, smart decision making from us all.

Finally, I know we can do this. This country and this community have been through a lot together and if we stick together, showing grace towards one another by wearing our masks and making good decisions for ourselves, our families and our employees, we will get through this and will keep our economy moving and our residents safe. But, it takes all of us, particularly as we look at coming into a major holiday weekend in eight days,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins.


Dallas County Health and Human Services
2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID‐19) Summary for June 26, 2020

All Dallas County COVID-19 Updates and Information can be found here: https://www.dallascounty.org/covid-19/

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends taking everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory diseases, including:

  • Stay home when you are sick, except to seek medical care
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and help young children to do the same. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipes.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw

Additional information is available at the following websites:


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/

Governor Abbott Secures Extension Of Federally-Supported COVID-19 Testing Sites In Texas

AUSTIN – Governor Greg Abbott today announced that the federal government has granted his request to extend operations of Community Based Testing Sites across Texas. The federal government will maintain support for the program while surging resources to Dallas and Houston in order to support testing needs within the community. 

“The State of Texas remains unwavering in our efforts to secure access to testing in communities across the state,” said Governor Abbott. “These federally-supported testing sites are a vital component of this commitment. I thank our federal partners for extending these operations in Texas, and for their flexibility in allocating their resources to the communities of Dallas and Houston that are experiencing a high number of COVID-19 cases right now. By continuing to increase testing and remaining vigilant against outbreaks of COVID-19, we will mitigate the spread of this virus and keep our communities safe.”

June 24, 2020

Governor Abbott, TDEM To Provide Free Masks To All Texans Who Are Tested At State-Run COVID-19 Mobile Testing Sites

AUSTIN – Governor Greg Abbott today announced that the Texas Division of Emergency Management (TDEM), in partnership with the Texas Military Department, will begin distributing 3-ply surgical masks to every Texan who undergoes COVID-19 testing at state-run mobile test collection sites. Beginning tomorrow, each Texan who receives a COVID-19 test at a state-run mobile testing site will be provided with four masks to take home with them. Texans can find a testing site near them by visiting TDEM’s COVID-19 Test Collection Site map

“Wearing a mask or facial covering in public is an effective way for Texans to protect themselves and others from the transmission of COVID-19,” said Governor Abbott. “This program helps ensure that Texans have the resources they need to effectively mitigate the spread of this virus and keep themselves and their communities safe. I continue to urge all Texans to do their part by taking necessary precautions that will reduce the spread of COVID-19 throughout our state.”


For additional information and updates from the City of Duncanville visit:
duncanville.com/covid-19/