Mayor Gordon Appointed to Serve on National League of Cities’ Information Technology and Communications Committee

“Technology and communications are major issues facing cities right now, and with increased security concerns it’s more important than ever to stay on top of how these activities affect our communities,” said Duncanville Mayor Barry Gordon. “I look forward to serving on the NLC ITC federal advocacy committee and working with my counterparts across the nation to advocate for solutions that are in the best interest of our cities”.

As a committee member, Gordon will play a key role in shaping NLC’s policy positions and advocate on behalf of America’s cities and towns before Congress, with the administration and at home.

“NLC’s federal advocacy committees ensure policymakers in Washington understand the most pressing issues facing local communities,” said Joe Buscaino, councilmember of Los Angeles, California, and president of the National League of Cities (NLC). “I am proud to have Duncanville Mayor Barry Gordon join NLC’s Information Technology and Communications committee on behalf of his residents. Together, with a team of local officials from across the country, we will strengthen the federal-local partnership, and ultimately create stronger cities, towns and villages.”

The leadership of this year’s committee will consist of Chair Corina Lopez, Vice Mayor, San Leandro, California, Vice Chair Alix Desulme, Councilman, North Miami, Florida, and Vice Chair Joseph Goldstein, Councilmember, Marietta, Georgia.

For more information on NLC’s federal advocacy committees, visit: www.nlc.org/advocacy/committees

Novel Coronavirus: Public Awareness Regarding the Respiratory Illness

A new coronavirus (2019-nCoV) was recently detected in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China and is causing an outbreak of respiratory illness. The 2019-nCoV outbreak began in December 2019, and Chinese health officials have reported hundreds of 2019‑nCoV infections in China, including several that resulted in death. Several additional countries have identified cases of 2019-nCoV infection including the United States.

The Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) is working closely with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in monitoring the developing outbreak. See the CDC website for the latest developments on 2019-nCoV, including current case counts: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/index.html

Census 2020 Student Poster Contest

Census 2020 Student Poster Contest

The Census 2020 Complete Count Committee and the City of Duncanville are sponsoring a poster contest to engage students in a discussion about the Census. The accurate counting of all people affects the entire community, and involving children in the process helps them understand the Census and its importance in our everyday lives.

Poster Contest Information

The Census 2020 Student Poster Contest is open to all Public, Private and Homeschooled students in grade categories K-5 and 6 – 12 living or attending a school in the Duncanville city limits.

Poster Theme: Middle & High School Students Theme: “Count Me”

Poster Theme: Kindergarten – 5th Grade Students Theme: “Count Me Too”

Entry Deadline: Friday, February 28, 2020

  • Posters must have a positive visual and verbal message and illustrate this year’s theme.
  • Any two-dimensional medium may be used (crayon, paint, pencil, marker, photos, etc).
  • Suggested Poster size is 11” x 17”.
  • Student’s Registration Page MUST be attached to the back of the poster to qualify. Please complete both sections.
  • No professional or copyrighted material or images.

Art, Science & Math Teachers, Guidance Counselors and Home School teachers are encouraged to use this contest as part of their curriculum. All students are urged to submit a poster. The winning posters will be used by the Duncanville Census 2020 Complete Count Committee through the campaign in various avenues to promote the mission.

Posters are judged in two categories: Best Message and Most Creative

Posters can be mailed or dropped off at City Hall at 203 E. Wheatland Road, Duncanville, before 5:00 pm on the deadline. Winners and Duncanville ISD will be notified by email and invited to a City Council meeting for recognition, date TBA. Questions about the poster contest should be directed to Chasidy Allen Benson at callen@duncanville.com or 972-707-3871.

About the Census

The Constitution mandates that the U.S. Census Bureau, a nonpartisan government agency, conduct a count of its population once every 10 years. The 2020 Census counts the population in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and five U.S. territories. Each home will receive an invitation to respond to a short questionnaire—online, by phone, or by mail. This year mark the first time that citizens will be able to respond to the census online.

The census provides critical data that lawmakers, business owners, teachers, and many others use to provide daily services, products, and support for you and your community. Every year, billions of dollars in federal funding goes to hospitals, fire departments, schools, roads, and other resources based on census data. The results of the census also determine the number of seats each state will have in the U.S. House of Representatives, and they are used to draw congressional and state legislative districts.

The 2020 Census will mark the 24th time that the country has counted its population since 1790. Participating in the census is required by law, even if you recently completed another survey from the Census Bureau. A complete and accurate count is critical for you and your community, because the results of the 2020 Census will affect community funding, congressional representation, and more.

2019 Duncanville State of the City

On January 16, 2020, the Chamber of Commerce hosted the annual Celebrate Duncanville: State of the City event at Hilton Garden Inn. Approximately 200 attendees from various businesses and community organizations came together to celebrate Duncanville’s progress over the past year, including awarding Duncanville’s Man and Woman of the Year, as well as the Mayor’s Choice Award for two local businesses.

The State of the City presented by Mayor Barry Gordon shares community highlights and city accomplishments for the year.

State of the City Video

The Mayor’s speech and PowerPoint presentation is also available in its entirety.

Mayor’s Speech & Presentation

2019 Duncanville Man and Woman of the Year

Man of the Year was awarded to Duncanville Police Officer Doug Sisk, pictured center with Mayor Gordon and wife Marlyse.
Woman of the Year was awarded to community visionary Betty Dunn, pictured with husband Weymond.

2019 Mayor’s Choice Award: Businesses

Redbird Skateland
Quality Aspirators

City of Duncanville Weekly Update: January 10, 2020

The City welcomes and encourages community members to stay up-to-date on City activities and projects, while increasing public awareness of the things the City does on a daily basis.

The City Manager provides a weekly update to City Council of departmental activities and other significant items of interest, and that in the interest of also keeping the public better informed, the City is pleased to make those updates available to the citizens.

Weekly Update for Week Ending: Friday, January 10, 2020

City Council Amends Solid Waste Ordinance, Impacts Brush/Bulk Collection

At the December 17, 2019 City Council meeting, the Duncanville City Council amended the Solid Waste ordinance after receiving input from residents. The changes primarily affect brush and bulk collection as outlined below. Residents will see a $2.31 increase per month for solid waste services on utility bills starting in January.

Postcard mailed to residents in January 2020 outlining changes to Republic Services Solid Waste Ordinance.

Kwanzaa 2019 in United States

Observance: Thursday, December 26 through Wednesday, January 1, 2020

Article Submitted by Dr. Lavern J. Holyfield, Multicultural Social Engagement Partnership (MSEP) Commissioner

Kwanzaa is a week-long pan-African holiday created by Dr. Maulana Karenga, a professor of Africana Studies, in 1966.  Observed in the United States and other nations of the African diaspora in the Americas from December 26 to January 1, this annual celebration honors African heritage in African-American culture.    Dr. Karenga envisioned it as a time to reflect the  best of African thought and practice in its reaffirmation of the dignity of the human person in community and culture, the well-being of family and community, the integrity of the environment and our kinship with it, and the rich resource and meaning of a people’s culture.

The focus of this period is the celebration of family, community, and culture.  Activities during this period are organized around the Seven Principles (pictured below). During the seven days, participants celebrate with feasts, music, dance, poetry, and narrative.  Kwanzaa has seven core principals and seven core symbols:

Day Seven Core Principles, or Nguzo Saba Seven Core Symbols
12/26 Umoja: Unity – To strive for and maintain unity in the family, community, nation, and race. Mazao: Crops – Mazao symbolizes the fruits of collective planning and work, and the resulting joy, sharing, unity and thanksgiving part of African harvest festivals. 
12/27 Kujichagulia: Self-Determination – To define ourselves, name ourselves, create for ourselves, and speak for ourselves. Mkeka: Place Mat – Just as the crops stand on the mkeka, the present day stands on the past. The mkeka symbolizes the historical and traditional foundation for people to stand on and build their lives.
12/28 Ujima: Collective Work and Responsibility – To build and maintain our community together and make our brothers’ and sisters’ problems our problems and solve them together. Muhindi: Ear of Corn – The stalk of corn represents fertility and the idea that through children, the future hopes of the family are brought to life. One vibunzi is placed on the mat for every child in the family.
12/29 Ujamaa: Cooperative Economics – To build and maintain our own stores, shops, and other businesses and to profit from them together. Mishumaa Saba: The Seven Candles – Candles are ceremonial objects that serve to symbolically re-create the sun’s power, as well as to provide light. There are three red candles, three green candles, and one black candle that are placed on the kinara.
12/30 Nia: Purpose – To make our collective vocation the building and developing of our community in order to restore our people to their traditional greatness. Kinara: The Candleholder – The kinara represents our ancestry, and the original stalk from which we came.  
12/31 Kuumba: Creativity – To do always as much as we can, in the way we can, in order to leave our community more beautiful and beneficial than we inherited it. Kikombe Cha Umoja: The Unity Cup – On the sixth day, the libation ritual is performed to honor the ancestors. Every family member and guest will take a drink together as a sign of unity and remembrance.
01/01 Imani: Faith – To believe with all our heart in our people, our parents, our teachers, our leaders, and the righteousness and victory of our struggle.   Zawadi: Gifts – On the seventh day of Kwanzaa, gifts are given to encourage growth, achievement, and success. Handmade gifts are encouraged to promote self-determination, purpose, and creativity.

There are seven candles – one black candle, three red candles, and three green. Each represents one of the seven principles guiding Kwanzaa. They are placed in the mishumaa saba in a specific order.

The holiday ends with a day dedicated to reflection and recommitment to the Seven Principals and other central cultural values, culminating in gift-giving and a feast.  

The Seven Principles
Mishumaa Saba (The Seven Candles)
These are symbolic of the Nguzo Saba, the Seven Principles, the matrix and minimum set of values which African people are urged to live by in order to rescue and reconstruct their lives in their own image and according to their own needs.

Source:  The OfficialKwanzaaWebsite.org (http://www.officialkwanzaawebsite.org/index.shtml)
(https://www.interexchange.org/articles/career-training-usa/history-principles-and-symbols-of-kwanzaa/)

The Duncanville Multicultural Social Engagement Partnership (MSEP) is a commission that serves under the City Council and is charged with:

  1. Establishing a partnership with the community to have the most engaged citizenry in America
  2. Develop an image as a family-oriented community locally and regionally
  3. Develop a brand for the community focusing on the goal of “Duncanville is the Basketball Capital of Texas” and leveraging this brand to enhance sports tourism
  4. Develop ways to engage citizens between 18-30 years of age to become more engaged in Duncanville
  5. Promote citizen participation and engagement in government; and to foster cooperative relationships among diverse citizens in order to fulfill the needs and desires and Duncanville’s diverse community